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RE: [UniQuaria] Re: Biozyne (sp?). Tank info inside

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  • Nimish Mathur
    Hi Matt, The ammonium part is a very basic chemical reaction. Ammonia is basically a base. Which means it can easily accept a Hydrogen Ion (H+) from an Acid.
    Message 1 of 12 , Feb 29, 2004
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      Hi Matt,

      The ammonium part is a very basic chemical reaction. Ammonia is basically a
      base. Which means it can easily accept a Hydrogen Ion (H+) from an Acid. In
      Lower PH the acid or H+ ions are in abundance hence neutralizing ammonia to
      Ammonium
      NH3 + HCL (H+ , CL-)-> NH4CL (NH4+ Ammonium, CL- Chloride)

      I don't think that it will effect biological filtration as I think that
      bacteria and plants both should be able to utilize the ammonia from the
      Ammonium salt. I will still go for a search on the net and let you know. It
      would be real daft that tanks with a PH of 5.5 have no biological
      filtration.

      Nim

      >-----Original Message-----
      >From: Matt Steis [mailto:msteis403@...]
      >Sent: 29 February 2004 22:11
      >To: UniQuaria@yahoogroups.com
      >Subject: Re: [UniQuaria] Re: Biozyne (sp?). Tank info inside
      >
      >Nim,
      >
      >Could you please point me to some info (if you know of any on the web),
      >on the ammonium content of your post. I was told, or I mistakenly
      >interpereted that below 6.4, biological filtration failed, and that
      >ammonium would build up. I have never let my pH drop from fear of this,
      >thus I don't have any personal experiece of ammonium buildup or lack of.
      >
      >Thanks Nim,
      >
      >Matt
      >
      >Nimish Mathur wrote:
      >
      >>Tilly,
      >>
      >>I never knew that Wales also has soft water. Anyways,
      >>A PH crash is a common feature in Soft water as it does not have any
      >>buffering capabilities. A PH of 5.5 will be ok for most tetras but the
      >Tiger
      >>barb may be stressed coz of that and also coz of not feeding. Feeding has
      >to
      >>be done and you cannot rely on plants or debris to feed the fish as when
      >the
      >>plants grow, they will consume the waste and plant diet is really not 100%
      >>for the fish. So you may have to get her to feed some balanced nutritious
      >>food if she does not.
      >>
      >>Regarding the PH crash, what is the PH of your tap water? if it is similar
      >>to 5.5 or 6, then I doubt there is a PH crash but any higher has to be
      >dealt
      >>with by making the water a little harder. You must be already aware on how
      >>to do it since you keep malawis.
      >>
      >>Regarding Ammonia release in a Low PH is not a question. What it means is
      >>that in a Low PH, ammonia tends to form Ammonium ions that are also being
      >>neutralized by the bacteria to give nitrates in the end. So if she does
      >not
      >>have any readable ammonia at low PH, it is unlikely that there will be any
      >>ammonia if the PH raises to 8 as the tank is cycled and it has been taken
      >>care of by the bacteria and the plants.
      >>
      >>Another thing, if there have been so many PH crashes, then even the plants
      >>should have been effected. Infact, many plants like cabomba etc. can melt
      >>away in a PH crash that a fish can still handle. Id advise her to start
      >>raising the KH of the water slowly until she gets a stable PH of 7 and the
      >>fish will be less stressed.
      >>
      >>Did you happen to check nitrates and nitrites in the water also? It is
      >>possible that the UGF is working too hard and is creating excess of
      >nitrates
      >>and hungry starving fish will be stressed very easily.
      >>
      >>Nim
      >>
      >>
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    • TS
      Thanks Matt I don t think my friend is using any ammonia locking products - I certainly don t quite see the point of them, I can t see how they can work
      Message 2 of 12 , Mar 1 6:30 AM
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        Thanks Matt

        I don't think my friend is using any ammonia locking products - I
        certainly don't quite see the point of them, I can't see how they can
        work without interfering with bacterial filtration (I believe in
        fishless cycling !!!) My own ammonia test kit tests for both ammonia
        and ammonium, not sure about my friend's.

        In my Malawi tanks I use coral sand (not exactly being a purist) and
        use either commericial rift salts & pH buffers or Sodium Bicarb and
        Epsom salts.

        The pH meters do sound pricey, wonder if they would be useful in this
        case though.

        This is all new to me, to be honest I rarely check the pH of my own
        tanks - have a routine for them which seems to work. I always think
        about nitrite if anyone looks off colour, but only had a problem once
        after being away overnight and my son had tipped half a box of food
        into the tank ;0(

        Regards

        Tilly, Wales

        > They do sell pH meters in aquarium catalogs for about $50. I don't
        know
        > how well the work though.
        >
        > Matt
        >
      • Matt Steis
        TS, I agree with you on the ammonia removers, and applaud you on your fishless cycling. I ve never done fishless cycling and can kick myself for the mistakes
        Message 3 of 12 , Mar 1 8:12 AM
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          TS,

          I agree with you on the ammonia removers, and applaud you on your fishless
          cycling. I've never done fishless cycling and can kick myself for the
          mistakes I've made and the prolonged cycling I've put fish through. It
          takes me at least two months to cycle a tank in my area. Can you point me
          to some directions for this?

          Matt

          ----- Original Message -----
          From: "TS" <cydcheriseuk@...>
          To: <UniQuaria@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Monday, March 01, 2004 9:30 AM
          Subject: [UniQuaria] Re: Biozyne (sp?). Tank info inside


          > Thanks Matt
          >
          > I don't think my friend is using any ammonia locking products - I
          > certainly don't quite see the point of them, I can't see how they can
          > work without interfering with bacterial filtration (I believe in
          > fishless cycling !!!) My own ammonia test kit tests for both ammonia
          > and ammonium, not sure about my friend's.
          >
          > In my Malawi tanks I use coral sand (not exactly being a purist) and
          > use either commericial rift salts & pH buffers or Sodium Bicarb and
          > Epsom salts.
          >
          > The pH meters do sound pricey, wonder if they would be useful in this
          > case though.
          >
          > This is all new to me, to be honest I rarely check the pH of my own
          > tanks - have a routine for them which seems to work. I always think
          > about nitrite if anyone looks off colour, but only had a problem once
          > after being away overnight and my son had tipped half a box of food
          > into the tank ;0(
          >
          > Regards
          >
          > Tilly, Wales
          >


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        • Betty Goetz
          Although I have not yet cycled a tank with ammonia, I just cycled a 6g Eclipse tank with snails. Because of some health issues (broken arm), I didn t do my
          Message 4 of 12 , Mar 1 11:28 AM
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            Although I have not yet cycled a tank with ammonia, I just cycled a 6g
            Eclipse tank with snails. Because of some health issues (broken arm),
            I didn't do my ammonia & nitrite testing regularly, but when I was
            ready to take on the tank maintenance and add fish (roughly 2 1/2
            months after setting it up), I already had nitrates showing up. I'd be
            curious to see when the nitrates started showing up, but I just don't
            have that data. It could have been weeks before I did the nitrate test
            (sigh). This was a perfect approach for a loach tank! The snails bred
            during the cycling process, the plants in the tank established
            themselves (and the Ambulia took over one whole side of the tank and
            is spreading rapidly!), and I had a ready-made smorgasboard for
            loaches. Unfortunately, I could only find ONE Botia striata but this
            little stripey guy cleaned the tank of snails within 2 days. I now
            bring home snail dinner for my loach several times a week from my
            tanks at work and I hope to be able to pick up another Botia striata
            this Friday. I've got a slew of supplies on order to set up my empty
            29g and 20L tanks currently hibernating in the garage....so the Botias
            will have larger quarters soon. I just need to figure out a place to
            put a double stand with both those tanks at home! They have quite a
            bit of competition for space with my orchids (sigh).

            On another note: I did cycle a 29g tank in 8 days with BioSpira.

            Betty Goetz
            near Seattle, WA
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