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Re: Oto flipped out

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  • Animal4766@xxx.xxx
    In a message dated 08/02/1999 7:00:05 AM Central Daylight Time, Sherri5762@aol.com writes:
    Message 1 of 6 , Aug 2, 1999
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      In a message dated 08/02/1999 7:00:05 AM Central Daylight Time,
      Sherri5762@... writes:

      << I have no idea if this could be related, but I recently had two newly
      purchased otto's die also. I bought them the day they came into the lfs.
      The next time I went back to buy more (I thought they died because my son
      dumped half a container of food into the tank) they told me that they had
      been treating the tank since 25 of them had died since they got them in and
      they weren't selling that batch anymore. Maybe yours came from the same
      supplier and have the same problem??
      >>


      hhuummmm......Must be some sort of major problem. The last three batches of
      otto's I have gotten in have all died within 24 hours or so. I was just
      blaming my supplier for improper packaging/shipping. Usually otto's are very
      hardy.

      Lisa
    • JTMW@xxxxx.xxxxxxxxxxxxxxxxx)
      Like a lot of LFS, most do not Quarantine, new fish, for three weeks, they just don t have enough tanks or time, It is our responsibility to ask questions, how
      Message 2 of 6 , Aug 2, 1999
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        Like a lot of LFS, most do not Quarantine, new fish, for three weeks,
        they just don't have enough tanks or time, It is our responsibility to
        ask questions, how long have you had that fish ?, what have you been
        feeding?, what kind of water? pH, Hardness, and any other special needs?
        should it be kept in a species tank? or will it do ok in a community
        tank? A lot of stores will tell you a fish will be ok in a community
        tank, but in reality when the fish grows to adult they become
        territorial and , or fin nippers, And the most important question how
        big will the fish get? Some fish like Pacus, and Redtailed Catfish can
        easily, out grow most tanks in less than a year.....So its our
        responsibility to ask questions? I don't but a fish unless its been
        their for three weeks, or the store has a guarantee of at least a
        week...of course if a fish dies the store will wont a sample a the tanks
        water, to do tests...
      • James Wesley
        I meant to say that I don t buy a fish unless the LFS has had it for three weeks, or has at least a week quarantine.
        Message 3 of 6 , Aug 2, 1999
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          I meant to say that I don't buy a fish unless the LFS has had it for
          three weeks, or has at least a week quarantine.
        • Tim Fisher
          Hi Tom, Sorry to hear about your Otto. From what you have said I agree that nitrite poisoning is the most likely culprit. Otto s take rapid falls in water
          Message 4 of 6 , Aug 2, 1999
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            Hi Tom,

            Sorry to hear about your Otto. From what you have said I agree that nitrite
            poisoning is the most likely culprit. Otto's take rapid falls in water
            quality very badly. O2 is unlikely to be the problem as this will effect
            the larger fish first.

            As a rule, you should not add any new fish to a tank unless both ammonia and
            nitrite are zero. Adding new fish will increase the bio load on the already
            overstreched filter and increase the problem, indeed it is more than
            possible to raise nitrite to completely toxic leaves this way (hence killing
            all your fish).

            Here is my step by step guide to avoiding nitrite/ammonia problems:

            1)Test before feeding.

            2)If neither Ammonia or Nitrite are detected then Do not Feed or add fish.

            3) continue to test daily until ammonia and nitrite are zero. Remember that
            if you had high ammonia then a high nitrite surge WILL follow.

            4) Start feeding fish again, begin only once every other day. Feed very
            lightly. Test the water for ammonia and nitrite on the day you are due to
            feed and only feed if the levels are zero.

            5) After a week feed daily, again test water and only feed if ammonia and
            nitrite are zero.

            6)After a week of daily feeding with no ammonia or nitrite showing it is now
            safe to add some new fish. Don't feed on the day you add the fish.

            7) Test the water the following day if everything is OK then feed normally,
            otherwise do a water change and start at step one again.

            In short if ammonia or nitrite are present in a tank you must not feed the
            fish or add new fish. The only acceptable level for this two is zero.

            Tim Fisher - LMD
            Lowestoft
            UK

            Fisher's Fishes: http://www.chimera99.free-online.co.uk


            > -----Original Message-----
            > From: Thomas Funk [mailto:grue@...]
            > Sent: 02 August 1999 06:50
            > To: uniquaria@onelist.com
            > Subject: [UniQuaria] Oto flipped out
            >
            >
            > From: Thomas Funk <grue@...>
            >
            > Hello all. Tonight one of my newly acquired otos flipped out, swam really
            > funnny and then died.
            >
            > I noticed when I first brought him home that one of his fins were missing,
            > but he seemed to be doing fine until tonight.
            >
            > Now, I am still cycling my tank and the nitrites are currently high, so it
            > may have been nitrite poisoning, although my other 4 otos are doing ok.
            > Also, I'm not sure, but could there have been a lack of oxygen? I
            > have read
            > that with plants you want to restrict surface agitation so CO2 doesn't
            > escape. But how do I know there's enough O2 in the tank? I did notice
            > yesterday that a couple of the otos would dash to the surface and take a
            > gulp of air and swim back down, "exhaling" bubbles.
            >
            > I searched deja and I found a thread on Corys doing this, but it
            > was natural.
            >
            > I have a 40 gallon with 2 red swords, 4 bulbs of something I forgot the
            > name of, but they are growing towards the top pretty quickly, 3 different
            > cryptocorynes (plus one really bushy one), and a small anubias, and a
            > banana plant.
            >
            > Should there be plenty of oxygen in my tank? How about the tetra test for
            > O2? Is that useful/accurate? Should I pick it up to be sure?
            >
            > In your opinion, could this death have been a result of high
            > nitrites, lack
            > of O2, or maybe he was already ill when brought home a week ago? Or
            > something else?
            >
            > I had originally purchased 6 otos(July 22). The first one died
            > the next day
            > (he stayed in the same place the whole time after I put him in my tank),
            > and then this one tonight.
            >
            > Thanks for any thoughts.
            >
            > Tom
            >
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