Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Bid Ancient (Eftis) get booted from ebay

Expand Messages
  • coin_ed
    So, wait, not only does Eftis sell fakes, but he shill bids too? Ridiculous. And yes, they are correct, shill bidding is everywhere on ebay and you ll always
    Message 1 of 4 , Feb 1, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      So, wait, not only does Eftis sell fakes, but he shill bids too?
      Ridiculous. And yes, they are correct, shill bidding is everywhere
      on ebay and you'll always know it's been done to you when you place
      a proxy and before the auction is over the total gets up to right
      below your max bid. On the past 3 auctions I bid on, every one of
      them had a shill. Also mentioned is ebay's lowsy customer service,
      which is also 100% correct. But when you think about it, what can
      they do about it? I mean, seriously, all this shill bidding and non
      payers/non shippers is all due to greedy people which is also very
      rampant on ebay as well. So let's not blame ebay, let's blame the
      users, or should I say abusers.

      I for one am glad Eftis is gone, but he will be back under a
      different name and ip address :(

      --- In Uncleanedcoins@yahoogroups.com, "Ernest Miner"
      <NEWEMPIRE@...> wrote:
      >
      > In case some may this that shill bidding on ebay goes un-noticed!
      >
      > Interesting reading in the Timesonline UK.
      >
      > Ebay user Eftis aka BidAncient shows true colors.
      >
      > OPEN DISCUSSION IS ENCOURAGED.
      > Happy reading.
      > Ernest.
      >
      > The Sunday Times January 28, 2007
      >
      >
      > Make me an offer: the eBay bid scam
      > Dealers fix online auctions with a little help from their friends
      >
      >
      > THE PORTLY antiquities dealer was happy to divulge the secrets of
      > his trade to the potential client who sat in the office of his
      > Cambridgeshire farmhouse.
      > Eftis Paraskevaides explained how to maximise the selling price on
      > eBay, the world's most popular internet auction site.
      >
      > He advised: "You phone up a mate, and say can you please make an
      > offer . . . that's called shill bidding, and strictly speaking
      it's
      > illegal. It's against eBay regulations."
      >
      > Asked if many sellers used the tactic, he replied: "Of course they
      > do. Come on! We're in the real world here."
      >
      > Paraskevaides is a man well versed in the techniques used to boost
      > sales on the auction site. He claims to be Britain's biggest eBay
      > seller with an income of £1.4m a year. But he was unaware that the
      > client he was trying to impress was in fact an undercover Sunday
      > Times reporter investigating dealers on eBay.
      >
      > Our inquiries have established that Paraskevaides was one of a
      > number of eBay sellers prepared to "shill bid" — to drive up
      prices
      > by asking friends or associates to bid on their goods.
      >
      > The site's safeguards are so lax that it is often impossible to
      > detect — especially if bids are placed on separate computers using
      > different eBay identities.
      >
      > Many regular eBay users complain that the practice is widespread
      > across the auction site.The Sunday Times has identified a number
      of
      > businesses — ranging from a car dealership to an overseas property
      > agency — that have bid on their own items.
      >
      > One former eBay employee said last week that "eBay never really
      > bothered that much about customer service".
      >
      > Since its foundation 11 years ago, eBay has become the world's
      > largest marketplace with 212m registered users. In Britain there
      are
      > 15m customers and the site accounts for 10% of all time spent on
      the
      > internet.
      >
      > The eBay phenomenon is driven by the simple idea of a marketplace
      > based on trust. Sellers and buyers strike a bargain at an internet
      > auction and their trading records are self-regulated by both
      > leaving "feedback" on the success of the transaction.
      >
      > For example, should an item not meet its description or should a
      > buyer fail to pay for the item, then this can be reported on a
      > trading record.
      >
      > Auctions, which last several days, often begin at £1 and a seller
      > cannot withdraw their goods in the last 12 hours when the bidding
      > usually hots up.
      >
      > Shill bidding allows sellers to increase the price of their own
      > items or to buy them back if the sale is not going well as it
      nears
      > its end. The practice is particularly suited to the internet where
      > eBay charges small commissions because it has such a high volume
      of
      > sales and few overheads.
      >
      > The auctions have attracted a growing band of entrepreneurs who
      have
      > made millions by trading solely through eBay.
      >
      > Remember folks, you saw it on UNCLEANEDCOINS first.
      >
      > Full story here.
      > http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2087-2570548_1,00.html
      >
    • New Empire
      Agreed! Unfortunately, when we choose to deal online, we are at the mercy of fraudsters, scam artists and the competition that cost us thousands of dollars per
      Message 2 of 4 , Feb 1, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        Agreed!

        Unfortunately, when we choose to deal online, we are at the mercy of fraudsters, scam artists and the competition that cost us thousands of dollars per year by using alias id's to bid on our items with no intention to pay.

        eBay has become much too big to self police or investigate every complaint. However, it is, refreshing to know that in time, at least, justice is served.. Thanks to several concerned collectors and dealers like the Ancientartifacts yahoo group, they at least, have no hidden agenda like some of the other groups.. ;-)

        Ernest.




        ----- Original Message -----
        From: coin_ed
        To: Uncleanedcoins@yahoogroups.com
        Sent: Thursday, February 01, 2007 11:15 AM
        Subject: [Uncleanedcoins] Re: Bid Ancient (Eftis) get booted from ebay


        So, wait, not only does Eftis sell fakes, but he shill bids too?
        Ridiculous. And yes, they are correct, shill bidding is everywhere
        on ebay and you'll always know it's been done to you when you place
        a proxy and before the auction is over the total gets up to right
        below your max bid. On the past 3 auctions I bid on, every one of
        them had a shill. Also mentioned is ebay's lowsy customer service,
        which is also 100% correct. But when you think about it, what can
        they do about it? I mean, seriously, all this shill bidding and non
        payers/non shippers is all due to greedy people which is also very
        rampant on ebay as well. So let's not blame ebay, let's blame the
        users, or should I say abusers.

        I for one am glad Eftis is gone, but he will be back under a
        different name and ip address :(

        --- In Uncleanedcoins@yahoogroups.com, "Ernest Miner"
        <NEWEMPIRE@...> wrote:
        >
        > In case some may this that shill bidding on ebay goes un-noticed!
        >
        > Interesting reading in the Timesonline UK.
        >
        > Ebay user Eftis aka BidAncient shows true colors.
        >
        > OPEN DISCUSSION IS ENCOURAGED.
        > Happy reading.
        > Ernest.
        >
        > The Sunday Times January 28, 2007
        >
        >
        > Make me an offer: the eBay bid scam
        > Dealers fix online auctions with a little help from their friends
        >
        >
        > THE PORTLY antiquities dealer was happy to divulge the secrets of
        > his trade to the potential client who sat in the office of his
        > Cambridgeshire farmhouse.
        > Eftis Paraskevaides explained how to maximise the selling price on
        > eBay, the world's most popular internet auction site.
        >
        > He advised: "You phone up a mate, and say can you please make an
        > offer . . . that's called shill bidding, and strictly speaking
        it's
        > illegal. It's against eBay regulations."
        >
        > Asked if many sellers used the tactic, he replied: "Of course they
        > do. Come on! We're in the real world here."
        >
        > Paraskevaides is a man well versed in the techniques used to boost
        > sales on the auction site. He claims to be Britain's biggest eBay
        > seller with an income of £1.4m a year. But he was unaware that the
        > client he was trying to impress was in fact an undercover Sunday
        > Times reporter investigating dealers on eBay.
        >
        > Our inquiries have established that Paraskevaides was one of a
        > number of eBay sellers prepared to "shill bid" - to drive up
        prices
        > by asking friends or associates to bid on their goods.
        >
        > The site's safeguards are so lax that it is often impossible to
        > detect - especially if bids are placed on separate computers using
        > different eBay identities.
        >
        > Many regular eBay users complain that the practice is widespread
        > across the auction site.The Sunday Times has identified a number
        of
        > businesses - ranging from a car dealership to an overseas property
        > agency - that have bid on their own items.
        >
        > One former eBay employee said last week that "eBay never really
        > bothered that much about customer service".
        >
        > Since its foundation 11 years ago, eBay has become the world's
        > largest marketplace with 212m registered users. In Britain there
        are
        > 15m customers and the site accounts for 10% of all time spent on
        the
        > internet.
        >
        > The eBay phenomenon is driven by the simple idea of a marketplace
        > based on trust. Sellers and buyers strike a bargain at an internet
        > auction and their trading records are self-regulated by both
        > leaving "feedback" on the success of the transaction.
        >
        > For example, should an item not meet its description or should a
        > buyer fail to pay for the item, then this can be reported on a
        > trading record.
        >
        > Auctions, which last several days, often begin at £1 and a seller
        > cannot withdraw their goods in the last 12 hours when the bidding
        > usually hots up.
        >
        > Shill bidding allows sellers to increase the price of their own
        > items or to buy them back if the sale is not going well as it
        nears
        > its end. The practice is particularly suited to the internet where
        > eBay charges small commissions because it has such a high volume
        of
        > sales and few overheads.
        >
        > The auctions have attracted a growing band of entrepreneurs who
        have
        > made millions by trading solely through eBay.
        >
        > Remember folks, you saw it on UNCLEANEDCOINS first.
        >
        > Full story here.
        > http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2087-2570548_1,00.html
        >





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Joseph Blazick
        The question is:for each one that e bay throws off ebay,how many are still active doing the same things. coin_ed wrote: So, wait,
        Message 3 of 4 , Feb 1, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          The question is:for each one that e bay throws off ebay,how many are still active doing the same things.

          coin_ed <coin_ed@...> wrote: So, wait, not only does Eftis sell fakes, but he shill bids too?
          Ridiculous. And yes, they are correct, shill bidding is everywhere
          on ebay and you'll always know it's been done to you when you place
          a proxy and before the auction is over the total gets up to right
          below your max bid. On the past 3 auctions I bid on, every one of
          them had a shill. Also mentioned is ebay's lowsy customer service,
          which is also 100% correct. But when you think about it, what can
          they do about it? I mean, seriously, all this shill bidding and non
          payers/non shippers is all due to greedy people which is also very
          rampant on ebay as well. So let's not blame ebay, let's blame the
          users, or should I say abusers.

          I for one am glad Eftis is gone, but he will be back under a
          different name and ip address :(

          --- In Uncleanedcoins@yahoogroups.com, "Ernest Miner"
          <NEWEMPIRE@...> wrote:
          >
          > In case some may this that shill bidding on ebay goes un-noticed!
          >
          > Interesting reading in the Timesonline UK.
          >
          > Ebay user Eftis aka BidAncient shows true colors.
          >
          > OPEN DISCUSSION IS ENCOURAGED.
          > Happy reading.
          > Ernest.
          >
          > The Sunday Times January 28, 2007
          >
          >
          > Make me an offer: the eBay bid scam
          > Dealers fix online auctions with a little help from their friends
          >
          >
          > THE PORTLY antiquities dealer was happy to divulge the secrets of
          > his trade to the potential client who sat in the office of his
          > Cambridgeshire farmhouse.
          > Eftis Paraskevaides explained how to maximise the selling price on
          > eBay, the world's most popular internet auction site.
          >
          > He advised: "You phone up a mate, and say can you please make an
          > offer . . . that's called shill bidding, and strictly speaking
          it's
          > illegal. It's against eBay regulations."
          >
          > Asked if many sellers used the tactic, he replied: "Of course they
          > do. Come on! We're in the real world here."
          >
          > Paraskevaides is a man well versed in the techniques used to boost
          > sales on the auction site. He claims to be Britain's biggest eBay
          > seller with an income of £1.4m a year. But he was unaware that the
          > client he was trying to impress was in fact an undercover Sunday
          > Times reporter investigating dealers on eBay.
          >
          > Our inquiries have established that Paraskevaides was one of a
          > number of eBay sellers prepared to "shill bid" — to drive up
          prices
          > by asking friends or associates to bid on their goods.
          >
          > The site's safeguards are so lax that it is often impossible to
          > detect — especially if bids are placed on separate computers using
          > different eBay identities.
          >
          > Many regular eBay users complain that the practice is widespread
          > across the auction site.The Sunday Times has identified a number
          of
          > businesses — ranging from a car dealership to an overseas property
          > agency — that have bid on their own items.
          >
          > One former eBay employee said last week that "eBay never really
          > bothered that much about customer service".
          >
          > Since its foundation 11 years ago, eBay has become the world's
          > largest marketplace with 212m registered users. In Britain there
          are
          > 15m customers and the site accounts for 10% of all time spent on
          the
          > internet.
          >
          > The eBay phenomenon is driven by the simple idea of a marketplace
          > based on trust. Sellers and buyers strike a bargain at an internet
          > auction and their trading records are self-regulated by both
          > leaving "feedback" on the success of the transaction.
          >
          > For example, should an item not meet its description or should a
          > buyer fail to pay for the item, then this can be reported on a
          > trading record.
          >
          > Auctions, which last several days, often begin at £1 and a seller
          > cannot withdraw their goods in the last 12 hours when the bidding
          > usually hots up.
          >
          > Shill bidding allows sellers to increase the price of their own
          > items or to buy them back if the sale is not going well as it
          nears
          > its end. The practice is particularly suited to the internet where
          > eBay charges small commissions because it has such a high volume
          of
          > sales and few overheads.
          >
          > The auctions have attracted a growing band of entrepreneurs who
          have
          > made millions by trading solely through eBay.
          >
          > Remember folks, you saw it on UNCLEANEDCOINS first.
          >
          > Full story here.
          > http://www.timesonline.co.uk/article/0,,2087-2570548_1,00.html
          >






          ---------------------------------
          The fish are biting.
          Get more visitors on your site using Yahoo! Search Marketing.

          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.