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Cheap UVB Meter

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  • RomanR
    I was searching eBay for a used 6.2 and ran across this thing. Anyone tried one? It says it s accurate within 10%. If it lasted long enough to try some
    Message 1 of 6 , Jan 24, 2013
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      I was searching eBay for a used 6.2 and ran across this thing. Anyone tried one? It says it's accurate within 10%. If it lasted long enough to try some different light combinations and set my initial basking distances I'd be happy! Lol
      http://item.mobileweb.ebay.com/viewitem?itemId=321057124071
    • vitd295nm
      I ordered one to test. Will advise. Have a whole cabinet full of every toy UV meter ever made... but have not seen this one before. So far all of them are
      Message 2 of 6 , Jan 25, 2013
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        I ordered one to test. Will advise. Have a whole cabinet full of every "toy" UV meter ever made... but have not seen this one before. So far all of them are nearly worthless to sun and totally worthless to UVB lamps. Maybe this one will be better?

        Easiest test is to point it at sun with a piece of glass or clear plastic over sensor to make sure it drops to zero. If not it is fake.

        Better tests involve using various Schott filters over sensor to both sun and several different UV lamps to quantify any out-of-bandwidth irradiance it is reading.

        Even if it is real... one word of caution: It only has one decimal point for the mW/cm2 display... not sensitive enough for most reptile lamps. The 0.9 pictured on display would be like 900 uW/cm2 on a Solarmeter Model 6.2 (851-949). So for lamps emitting anywhere from 51-149 uW/cm2 (typical reptile lamp output) this thing would simply read 0.1 mW/cm2. You couldn't even track aging accurately.

        Steve from Solartech

        --- In UVB_Meter_Owners@yahoogroups.com, "RomanR" wrote:
        >
        > I was searching eBay for a used 6.2 and ran across this thing. Anyone tried one? It says it's accurate within 10%. If it lasted long enough to try some different light combinations and set my initial basking distances I'd be happy! Lol
        > http://item.mobileweb.ebay.com/viewitem?itemId=321057124071
        >
      • RomanR
        Oh very cool! I was wondering about the ranges on those. I d love to get a Solarmeter, but I only have one pet and I can t justify the price right now. I
        Message 3 of 6 , Jan 25, 2013
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          Oh very cool! I was wondering about the ranges on those. I'd love to get a Solarmeter, but I only have one pet and I can't justify the price right now. I guess I'll keep watching for one on eBay! :)

          --- In UVB_Meter_Owners@yahoogroups.com, "vitd295nm" wrote:
          >
          > I ordered one to test. Will advise. Have a whole cabinet full of every "toy" UV meter ever made... but have not seen this one before. So far all of them are nearly worthless to sun and totally worthless to UVB lamps. Maybe this one will be better?
          >
          > Easiest test is to point it at sun with a piece of glass or clear plastic over sensor to make sure it drops to zero. If not it is fake.
          >
          > Better tests involve using various Schott filters over sensor to both sun and several different UV lamps to quantify any out-of-bandwidth irradiance it is reading.
          >
          > Even if it is real... one word of caution: It only has one decimal point for the mW/cm2 display... not sensitive enough for most reptile lamps. The 0.9 pictured on display would be like 900 uW/cm2 on a Solarmeter Model 6.2 (851-949). So for lamps emitting anywhere from 51-149 uW/cm2 (typical reptile lamp output) this thing would simply read 0.1 mW/cm2. You couldn't even track aging accurately.
          >
          > Steve from Solartech
          >
          > --- In UVB_Meter_Owners@yahoogroups.com, "RomanR" wrote:
          > >
          > > I was searching eBay for a used 6.2 and ran across this thing. Anyone tried one? It says it's accurate within 10%. If it lasted long enough to try some different light combinations and set my initial basking distances I'd be happy! Lol
          > > http://item.mobileweb.ebay.com/viewitem?itemId=321057124071
          > >
          >
        • ukcakeman
          Hi, im currently doing a study where im using both a solarmeter 5.7 and 6.2. At the moment i am only carrying out a pilot but i have noticed considerable uv
          Message 4 of 6 , Feb 8, 2013
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            Hi, im currently doing a study where im using both a solarmeter 5.7 and 6.2. At the moment i am only carrying out a pilot but i have noticed considerable uv degredation on brand new uv sources using these solarmeters. Intrestingly i found that fluorescent of the compact variety, namely exo terra, appear to have no benefit at all as they do not seem to produce enough levels of UV unless you take a reading from about 1mm away from the bulb. Its certainly interesting to find out exactly what we are buying.

            --- In UVB_Meter_Owners@yahoogroups.com, "RomanR" wrote:
            >
            > Oh very cool! I was wondering about the ranges on those. I'd love to get a Solarmeter, but I only have one pet and I can't justify the price right now. I guess I'll keep watching for one on eBay! :)
            >
            > --- In UVB_Meter_Owners@yahoogroups.com, "vitd295nm" wrote:
            > >
            > > I ordered one to test. Will advise. Have a whole cabinet full of every "toy" UV meter ever made... but have not seen this one before. So far all of them are nearly worthless to sun and totally worthless to UVB lamps. Maybe this one will be better?
            > >
            > > Easiest test is to point it at sun with a piece of glass or clear plastic over sensor to make sure it drops to zero. If not it is fake.
            > >
            > > Better tests involve using various Schott filters over sensor to both sun and several different UV lamps to quantify any out-of-bandwidth irradiance it is reading.
            > >
            > > Even if it is real... one word of caution: It only has one decimal point for the mW/cm2 display... not sensitive enough for most reptile lamps. The 0.9 pictured on display would be like 900 uW/cm2 on a Solarmeter Model 6.2 (851-949). So for lamps emitting anywhere from 51-149 uW/cm2 (typical reptile lamp output) this thing would simply read 0.1 mW/cm2. You couldn't even track aging accurately.
            > >
            > > Steve from Solartech
            > >
            > > --- In UVB_Meter_Owners@yahoogroups.com, "RomanR" wrote:
            > > >
            > > > I was searching eBay for a used 6.2 and ran across this thing. Anyone tried one? It says it's accurate within 10%. If it lasted long enough to try some different light combinations and set my initial basking distances I'd be happy! Lol
            > > > http://item.mobileweb.ebay.com/viewitem?itemId=321057124071
            > > >
            > >
            >
          • lilacdawndragon
            ... LOL it certainly is, UKCakeman! Welcome to the group. We d love to see your results.. What model ExoTerra was that? :-)) Yes, I ve found some brands start
            Message 5 of 6 , Feb 8, 2013
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              >Its certainly interesting to find out exactly what we are buying.

              LOL it certainly is, UKCakeman!
              Welcome to the group. We'd love to see your results..

              What model ExoTerra was that? :-))

              Yes, I've found some brands start off with nothing; others decay really fast; but there are other brands which have excellent output and decay only 30% in a year.
              Your observation about rapid decay in the first 100 hours or so, is spot-on.
              Decay slows with time; after about 1,000 hours (3 months use) most fluorescents from reliable brands seem pretty stable.

              Best wishes

              Frances


              --- In UVB_Meter_Owners@yahoogroups.com, "ukcakeman" wrote:
              >
              > Hi, im currently doing a study where im using both a solarmeter 5.7 and 6.2. At the moment i am only carrying out a pilot but i have noticed considerable uv degredation on brand new uv sources using these solarmeters. Intrestingly i found that fluorescent of the compact variety, namely exo terra, appear to have no benefit at all as they do not seem to produce enough levels of UV unless you take a reading from about 1mm away from the bulb. Its certainly interesting to find out exactly what we are buying.
              >
            • vitd295nm
              I finally received this latest toy meter today... took 2 weeks to arrive. The original link (in a prior post on this thread) says it reads UVB in uW/cm2 from
              Message 6 of 6 , Feb 8, 2013
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                I finally received this latest "toy" meter today... took 2 weeks to arrive. The original link (in a prior post on this thread) says it reads UVB in uW/cm2 from lamps. Totally bogus. It does not.

                Rather... per the label stuck on the back of it... it purports to read UV Index. That is why the picture of it showed a reading of 0.9 rather than a large number (ie 100) as a Model 6.2 would read.

                Test with WG filter glasses showed it to be similar to all the other toy meters... picking up mostly UVA rather than either UVB or UV Index Eeff irradiance. At least it isn't picking up visible because a WG400 filter dropped reading to zero. So forgettabout it.

                Or buy one and see for yourself... it's a free world (so to speak).

                For "UKCAKEMAN" (do they have cakes in England haha)... when you take a 5.7 and 6.2 meter reading to same lamp at same distance... subtract only half of the 6.2 reading from the 5.7 reading for UVA... because the 5.7 only "sees" half of the UVB fyi.

                --- In UVB_Meter_Owners@yahoogroups.com, "lilacdawndragon" wrote:
                >
                > >Its certainly interesting to find out exactly what we are buying.
                >
                > LOL it certainly is, UKCakeman!
                > Welcome to the group. We'd love to see your results..
                >
                > What model ExoTerra was that? :-))
                >
                > Yes, I've found some brands start off with nothing; others decay really fast; but there are other brands which have excellent output and decay only 30% in a year.
                > Your observation about rapid decay in the first 100 hours or so, is spot-on.
                > Decay slows with time; after about 1,000 hours (3 months use) most fluorescents from reliable brands seem pretty stable.
                >
                > Best wishes
                >
                > Frances
                >
                >
                > --- In UVB_Meter_Owners@yahoogroups.com, "ukcakeman" wrote:
                > >
                > > Hi, im currently doing a study where im using both a solarmeter 5.7 and 6.2. At the moment i am only carrying out a pilot but i have noticed considerable uv degredation on brand new uv sources using these solarmeters. Intrestingly i found that fluorescent of the compact variety, namely exo terra, appear to have no benefit at all as they do not seem to produce enough levels of UV unless you take a reading from about 1mm away from the bulb. Its certainly interesting to find out exactly what we are buying.
                > >
                >
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