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Decent UVB level from Arcadia D3+ T5s

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  • peter.stones
    Hi All, I recently put together a new luminaire using a couple of 39W Arcadia T5 D3+ lamps with reflectors and a Philips HF ballast. I was very pleasantly
    Message 1 of 3 , Sep 3, 2012
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      Hi All,

      I recently put together a new luminaire using a couple of 39W Arcadia T5 D3+ lamps with reflectors and a Philips HF ballast. I was very pleasantly surprised by the result. Compared to their dismal 160W Hg Vapour lamps (around 65ìWcm-2 at 12") this set up produces a useful level of UVB, distributed over a much greater area, and with less than half the heat, plus acceptable colour rendering and half the running cost:

      On the bench around 385ìWcm-2 at 12" within 30 seconds of initial start up. After a couple of weeks in situ burning approx 12hr per day I have 400ìWcm-2 at 11" along the centre line of the luminaire. At last, a decent UVB output for my tropical torts without cooking them! Fingers crossed the decay rate lives up to Arcadia claims. I would like to know what results others are having with the longevity of UVB output from these lamps?

      Meanwhile, barring a rapid fall off in output, I intend to replace all my HgVs, metal halide, and T8s as they expire with D3+ T5s plus a simple spot (or IR) for basking.

      Cheers,
      Peter
    • lilacdawndragon
      Hi, Peter. Yes, these tubes are quite remarkable. Look in our files section for a full report. I m quite concerned at your very high UVB levels in your basking
      Message 2 of 3 , Sep 3, 2012
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        Hi, Peter.

        Yes, these tubes are quite remarkable. Look in our files section for a full report.
        I'm quite concerned at your very high UVB levels in your basking zone, though.

        The Arcadia T5 tubes have spectra which give Solarmeter 6.2 readings which are quite a good match to those you get from full tropical sunlight, as these have similar proportions of short- and long-wavelength UVB to an overhead sun. So it's reasonable, with these, to make a fairly direct comparison.

        400 uW/cm2 of total UVB, measured with a Solarmeter 6.2 meter, is equivalent to sunlight and/or light from an Arcadia T5 12% tube, of UV Index 11.
        This is the full strength of tropical sun approaching noon.
        Very few tropical species voluntarily bask in this strength of sunlight - most species seek shade by about 10 - 10.30am when the readings are around UV Index 6-7, maybe 8 at most.
        It is the heat of the sun that they seem to use as a cue to seek shelter, so if your basking zone stays at a "comfortable" temperature all day - in contrast to tropical sunlit land which will reach 50C or more - then your torts may expose themselves to un-naturally high doses of UVB, because it won't get hot enough in the basking zone to encourage them to seek shade.
        May I suggest that with these very high-output tubes, you might find it beneficial to increase the height until you are reading no more than UVI 6-7 at the closest point in the basking zone? With this particular spectrum, you will achieve that when the Solarmeter 6.2 reads approximately 285 - 315 uW/cm2.

        The Arcadia D3 Basking Lamp - the 160W mercury vapour lamp - has a very different spectrum. This spectrum has a much higher percentage of its output in the shorter UVB wavelengths, which are much more photoreactive than natural sunlight.
        An output of 65 uW/cm2 on a Solarmeter 6.2 from one of these lamps is equivalent to approximately UV Index 3.6.
        Sunlight with a UV Index of 3.6 will give you a Solarmeter 6.2 reading of about 200 uW/cm2.
        Yes.... 65 uW/cm2 of UVB from this mercury vapour lamp is approximately equivalent to 200 uW/cm2 of UVB from sunlight.
        The reason for this is that sunlight (and certain fluorescent tubes) emit FAR more long-wavelength UVB than short-wavelength UVB; but it's the short-wavelength part that has the strong effect on skin, hence the higher UV Index, risk of burning and, of course, vitamin D3 synthesis.
        But a Solarmeter 6.2 reports on the entire UVB range.

        I hope this helps... it's a thorny subject for us to get our heads around!

        Best wishes,

        Frances

        ps. The longevity of the T5 Arcadia tubes that I have tested has been exceptionally good... only around 30% - 35% decay over a full year of use. (4,000 hours at 10-12hrs/day)


        --- In UVB_Meter_Owners@yahoogroups.com, "peter.stones" <peter.stones@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hi All,
        >
        > I recently put together a new luminaire using a couple of 39W Arcadia T5 D3+ lamps with reflectors and a Philips HF ballast. I was very pleasantly surprised by the result. Compared to their dismal 160W Hg Vapour lamps (around 65ìWcm-2 at 12") this set up produces a useful level of UVB, distributed over a much greater area, and with less than half the heat, plus acceptable colour rendering and half the running cost:
        >
        > On the bench around 385ìWcm-2 at 12" within 30 seconds of initial start up. After a couple of weeks in situ burning approx 12hr per day I have 400ìWcm-2 at 11" along the centre line of the luminaire. At last, a decent UVB output for my tropical torts without cooking them! Fingers crossed the decay rate lives up to Arcadia claims. I would like to know what results others are having with the longevity of UVB output from these lamps?
        >
        > Meanwhile, barring a rapid fall off in output, I intend to replace all my HgVs, metal halide, and T8s as they expire with D3+ T5s plus a simple spot (or IR) for basking.
        >
        > Cheers,
        > Peter
        >
      • Actiondisplay
        Excellent information, thank you Frances. So... hmmm... Comparing Arcadia HO t5s to merc. vapor **with the readings you get from a solarmeter 6.2** is kind of
        Message 3 of 3 , Sep 6, 2012
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          Excellent information, thank you Frances.

          So... hmmm...

          Comparing Arcadia HO t5s to merc. vapor **with the readings you get from a solarmeter 6.2** is kind of like an apples and oranges comparison?

          Most interesting!

          Cheers,
          Todd

          www.LightYourReptiles.com
          lightyourreptiles@...


          -----Original Message-----
          From: lilacdawndragon <lilacdragon@...>
          To: UVB_Meter_Owners <UVB_Meter_Owners@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Mon, Sep 3, 2012 12:41 pm
          Subject: [UVB_Meter_Owners] Re: Decent UVB level from Arcadia D3+ T5s





          Hi, Peter.

          Yes, these tubes are quite remarkable. Look in our files section for a full report.
          I'm quite concerned at your very high UVB levels in your basking zone, though.

          The Arcadia T5 tubes have spectra which give Solarmeter 6.2 readings which are quite a good match to those you get from full tropical sunlight, as these have similar proportions of short- and long-wavelength UVB to an overhead sun. So it's reasonable, with these, to make a fairly direct comparison.

          400 uW/cm2 of total UVB, measured with a Solarmeter 6.2 meter, is equivalent to sunlight and/or light from an Arcadia T5 12% tube, of UV Index 11.
          This is the full strength of tropical sun approaching noon.
          Very few tropical species voluntarily bask in this strength of sunlight - most species seek shade by about 10 - 10.30am when the readings are around UV Index 6-7, maybe 8 at most.
          It is the heat of the sun that they seem to use as a cue to seek shelter, so if your basking zone stays at a "comfortable" temperature all day - in contrast to tropical sunlit land which will reach 50C or more - then your torts may expose themselves to un-naturally high doses of UVB, because it won't get hot enough in the basking zone to encourage them to seek shade.
          May I suggest that with these very high-output tubes, you might find it beneficial to increase the height until you are reading no more than UVI 6-7 at the closest point in the basking zone? With this particular spectrum, you will achieve that when the Solarmeter 6.2 reads approximately 285 - 315 uW/cm2.

          The Arcadia D3 Basking Lamp - the 160W mercury vapour lamp - has a very different spectrum. This spectrum has a much higher percentage of its output in the shorter UVB wavelengths, which are much more photoreactive than natural sunlight.
          An output of 65 uW/cm2 on a Solarmeter 6.2 from one of these lamps is equivalent to approximately UV Index 3.6.
          Sunlight with a UV Index of 3.6 will give you a Solarmeter 6.2 reading of about 200 uW/cm2.
          Yes.... 65 uW/cm2 of UVB from this mercury vapour lamp is approximately equivalent to 200 uW/cm2 of UVB from sunlight.
          The reason for this is that sunlight (and certain fluorescent tubes) emit FAR more long-wavelength UVB than short-wavelength UVB; but it's the short-wavelength part that has the strong effect on skin, hence the higher UV Index, risk of burning and, of course, vitamin D3 synthesis.
          But a Solarmeter 6.2 reports on the entire UVB range.

          I hope this helps... it's a thorny subject for us to get our heads around!

          Best wishes,

          Frances

          ps. The longevity of the T5 Arcadia tubes that I have tested has been exceptionally good... only around 30% - 35% decay over a full year of use. (4,000 hours at 10-12hrs/day)

          --- In UVB_Meter_Owners@yahoogroups.com, "peter.stones" <peter.stones@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi All,
          >
          > I recently put together a new luminaire using a couple of 39W Arcadia T5 D3+ lamps with reflectors and a Philips HF ballast. I was very pleasantly surprised by the result. Compared to their dismal 160W Hg Vapour lamps (around 65ìWcm-2 at 12") this set up produces a useful level of UVB, distributed over a much greater area, and with less than half the heat, plus acceptable colour rendering and half the running cost:
          >
          > On the bench around 385ìWcm-2 at 12" within 30 seconds of initial start up. After a couple of weeks in situ burning approx 12hr per day I have 400ìWcm-2 at 11" along the centre line of the luminaire. At last, a decent UVB output for my tropical torts without cooking them! Fingers crossed the decay rate lives up to Arcadia claims. I would like to know what results others are having with the longevity of UVB output from these lamps?
          >
          > Meanwhile, barring a rapid fall off in output, I intend to replace all my HgVs, metal halide, and T8s as they expire with D3+ T5s plus a simple spot (or IR) for basking.
          >
          > Cheers,
          > Peter
          >









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