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Re: high frequency tubes??

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  • lilacdawndragon
    Hi, Henry. Yes, I think it must be... although I ve never heard that term before. It is only the ballast box that is electronic, though. Ordinary reptile UVB
    Message 1 of 4 , Jan 1, 2007
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      Hi, Henry.
      Yes, I think it must be... although I've never heard that term before.
      It is only the ballast box that is electronic, though.
      Ordinary reptile UVB tubes (eg. the ZooMed Reptisun 10.0 tube we were
      discussing on another topic) work with either an ordinary magnetic
      ballast like this one:
      http://www.arcadia-uk.info/product.php?pid=1&mid=10&lan=en&sub=&id=4

      Or a new electronic ballast like this one:
      http://www.arcadia-uk.info/product.php?pid=7&mid=10&lan=en

      There's some interesting "blurb" about these, on that page.

      I have one electronic ballast, a cheaper one made by Hagan, (but
      their website is down so I can't find a link)... The electronic
      ballast is, I think, a lot more pleasant to use. It doesn't get
      nearly as hot. Interestingly, though I don't know why, tubes on it
      don't run as hot, either, but they do have a slightly lower UVB
      output as well. I can't say about the flicker, I can't see any myself
      with either type, but the tubes start up more smoothly and quickly
      with the electronic ballast, you don't get that initial clicking
      sound and double flick of light at the electrodes.

      It's annoying that they don't seem to make an electronic ballast for
      one tube... only a pair.

      Frances


      --- In UVB_Meter_Owners@yahoogroups.com, henry brames
      <henry.brames@...> wrote:
      >
      > is an electronic ballasted tube (i never saw a ficture of them
      > consiously in germany)
      > a high frequency tube?
      >
      > gx henry

      > Choosing a date in a disco can be a serious mistake. Captive birds
      have
      > a similar problem. The stroboscopic effect of fluorescent lights in
      > farms and zoos may prevent them from assessing potential mates
      properly.
    • lilacdawndragon
      Should we worry about a stroboscopic effect in the vivarium?... I am not convinced yet, that there is cause for concern for reptiles. If lizards have a faster
      Message 2 of 4 , Jan 1, 2007
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        Should we worry about a stroboscopic effect in the vivarium?... I am
        not convinced yet, that there is cause for concern for reptiles.
        If lizards have a faster critical flicker fusion frequency(CFFF)than
        us (as birds do) then they should not be able to watch videos and
        understand them (as did the Australian Jacky Lizards in that study I
        gave you a link to.)
        Fish seem to have a CFFF that is dependent upon body temperature.
        Presumably there's a physiological reason for this, something to do
        with neurons firing more slowly if cold, or something? I would have
        thought that this should be similar in reptiles, whereas birds are of
        course warm blooded and indeed, have body temperatures that are
        normally higher than ours.
        To be certain we could do with some more scientific studies, but I'm
        a great believer in little Kitchen Experiments.
        Has anyone got the time to video their iguana, bearded dragon or
        other large-brained, socially responsive reptile moving around... and
        take some similar video with no reptile in it... and show it to their
        pet and see what he does?
        If he can see himself, and recognise "another lizard" - you should
        see a different response to the bits where he appears, than to the
        boring shots of your backyard.
        Just a thought!

        If they can watch videos at 60Hz then they shouldn't have a problem
        with 100Hz from a fluorescent lamp... should they?

        Frances

        --- In UVB_Meter_Owners@yahoogroups.com, henry brames
        <henry.brames@...> wrote:
        >
        > is an electronic ballasted tube (i never saw a ficture of them
        > consiously in germany)
        > a high frequency tube?
        >
        > gx henry

        > Choosing a date in a disco can be a serious mistake. Captive birds
        have
        > a similar problem. The stroboscopic effect of fluorescent lights in
        > farms and zoos may prevent them from assessing potential mates
        properly.
      • Andy & Janette Beveridge
        ... That is because a decent electronic ballast does not supply power to the heater filaments at the ends of the tube after the lamp has started. The plasma is
        Message 3 of 4 , Jan 1, 2007
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          >The electronic
          >ballast is, I think, a lot more pleasant to use. It doesn't get
          >nearly as hot. Interestingly, though I don't know why, tubes on it
          >don't run as hot, either

          That is because a decent electronic ballast does not supply power to
          the heater filaments at the ends of the tube after the lamp has
          started. The plasma is continuous so does not have to be re-ignited
          100 times a second.
          Some electronic ballasts do not use the filaments at all - it is
          possible to strike the tube just by briefly applying a very high
          voltage. Electronic ballasts can also include circuitry to detect
          when the plasma has gone out and automatically re-ignite it if necessary.

          >, but they do have a slightly lower UVB
          >output as well.

          I expect that is just coincidence - probably the ballast is not set
          up optimally for the tube you are using. There is no reason why an
          electronic ballast should be dimmer. Unlike a magnetic ballast, an
          electronic ballast can be very easily adjusted to run a tube at
          anything from ~20% to about 200% (with shorter lifespan). There are
          in fact adjustable ballasts available - they allow you to overrun the
          tube to compensate for falling light output in older tubes.

          >It's annoying that they don't seem to make an electronic ballast for
          >one tube... only a pair.

          The parts are widely available for 1,2, or 4 tubes. It's just what
          particular part Hagen chose to put in a plastic case and sell as a
          reptile ballast.

          If you would like some electronic ballasts I can bash a few up very
          easily. I just need to know what power rating.
          The fiddly part is the end-caps. If you run what our American friends
          call a "shop-light" fitting it is very easy. But the waterprrof wired
          end-caps that Arcadia and Hagen provide in the EU are very hard to
          come by. I can do non-waterproof ones (very cheaply available) that
          would be fine for lamp testing but I would be reluctant to put them
          into real vivarium use.

          - Andy
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