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RE: [UV-3R] Broadcast/Marine/UHF CB

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  • John LaMartina
    I have 2 of the stubby antennas and to say they are the least effective antenna I own would be too complimentary. The only reason I own then is that I live
    Message 1 of 11 , Aug 28, 2013
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       I have 2 of the stubby antennas and to say they are the least effective antenna I own would be too complimentary. The only reason I own then is that I live approximately 700 feet from the repeater. Any more than a mile or two away, they are useless. Cute, but useless.
      They work somewhat on UHF and very poorly on VHF. They are way too short to be effective. Stick with a Nagoya. The longer the radiating element, the better.
      http://www.amazon.com/gp/search/ref=as_li_qf_sp_sr_il?ie=UTF8&camp=1789&creative=9325&index=aps&keywords=uv5r%20antenna&linkCode=as2&tag=miklor-20

      John K3NXU http://www.miklor.com/UV3R

       

      From: UV-3R@yahoogroups.com [mailto:UV-3R@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Mark Robinson
      Sent: Wednesday, August 28, 2013 10:48 AM
      To: UV-3R@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: Re: [UV-3R] Broadcast/Marine/UHF CB

       

       

      On 29/08/13 01:31, Jim Kellogg wrote:

      > Hello all,
      >
      > I'm a Australian newbie to this group and need some help. I'm not a ham
      > and purchased a UV-3R to use on Marine channels 156.0500 to 162.0250 and
      > program Australia UHF CB channels 476.4250 to 477.4125 and maybe FM
      > broadcast stations 87.5 to 108.0
      > ...
      > Also do these stubby antennas work about as well as the long stock antenna?
      > http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/181118873940
      >
      > Thanks,
      > Jim

      Long antennae almost always work better than short ones, but the stock antennae
      are designed for the amateur bands and you intend to operate the radio
      significantly beyond them so you would probably be best to buy or build
      antennae for the bands you intend to operate on. A quarter wavelength whip
      would be a good start, and is very easy to make: a connector, a piece of wire
      and a small piece of insulating sleeve.

      Older UV-3Rs, at least, have a problem with excessive second harmonic emission
      and the antenna may well be part of the mitigation for this at amateur
      frequencies.

      Other filtering to address unwanted emissions, and the inherent design of the
      radio, may make it work poorly outside the amateur bands.

      Further, the radio isn't designed or rated for commercial use (in NZ at least)
      so be careful using it on other bands which require type approved equipment.

      Cheers,
      Mark
      --

      No virus found in this message.
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    • LonnieW
      I have that exact same antenna. I m pretty sure that a wet noodle would work better than that antenna! It s nice for listening to event traffic while you re
      Message 2 of 11 , Aug 29, 2013
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        I have that exact same antenna. I'm pretty sure that a wet noodle would work better than that antenna! It's nice for listening to event traffic while you're attending said event, but is deaf otherwise.

        Lonnie, N9IUI


        --- In UV-3R@yahoogroups.com, Jim Kellogg <jim@...> wrote:
        >
        > Hello all,
        >
        > I'm a Australian newbie to this group and need some help. I'm not a ham
        > and purchased a UV-3R to use on Marine channels 156.0500 to 162.0250 and
        > program Australia UHF CB channels 476.4250 to 477.4125 and maybe FM
        > broadcast stations 87.5 to 108.0
        >
        > My question is can I just buy a USB programming cable from China like
        > this one http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/290897413792 or is it more tricky
        > then that to add UHF CB? Can someone refer me to a step by step
        > programming guide?
        >
        > Also do these stubby antennas work about as well as the long stock antenna?
        > http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/181118873940
        >
        > Thanks,
        >
        > Jim
        >
      • m6mfp@sky.com
        Hi Jim, First aerials: The 805 stubbies are just rubbish tbh, I ve tried a few (bought one, borrowed a couple) and they don t come close to my old original
        Message 3 of 11 , Aug 29, 2013
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          Hi Jim,

          First aerials: The 805 stubbies are just rubbish tbh, I've tried a few (bought one, borrowed a couple) and they don't come close to my old original Diamond RH3 stubby (with a bnc adapter), the RH3 knocks spots of the (fake?) Diamond/Nagoya ones, but the RH3 cost £30 GBP + P&P to buy now, I just happened to have one from a long time ago. The best I've found is the Retech 605 stubby: http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/230993750710 which does actually come close to the RH3 performance wise, but being small there's a compromise of course. Longer aerials will work better as has been said already, it's your choice mate :)

          UHF CB: I think the UV-3R only goes up to 470MHz by default so you'll need to expand it's frequency range to use 476/477MHz Oz CB freq's but it's not hard to do. If you use the BaoFeng software (download from the BaoFeng website) you only have to alter the setting.ini in the program's install folder and re-save it.

          Look for:
          Freq0=[136-174/400-470]
          data0=6013401700400047

          and change it to:
          Freq0=[136-174/400-480]
          data0=6013401700400048

          When you launch the software after changes you'll have to 'write to radio' with the new range and it will clear all your memory channels, but you can add new ones afterwards and if you then save it it'll keep the new freq's range.

          Have fun :D

          You can then program in the Oz CB channels.

          --- In UV-3R@yahoogroups.com, Jim Kellogg <jim@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hello all,
          >
          > I'm a Australian newbie to this group and need some help. I'm not a ham
          > and purchased a UV-3R to use on Marine channels 156.0500 to 162.0250 and
          > program Australia UHF CB channels 476.4250 to 477.4125 and maybe FM
          > broadcast stations 87.5 to 108.0
          >
          > My question is can I just buy a USB programming cable from China like
          > this one http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/290897413792 or is it more tricky
          > then that to add UHF CB? Can someone refer me to a step by step
          > programming guide?
          >
          > Also do these stubby antennas work about as well as the long stock antenna?
          > http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/181118873940
          >
          > Thanks,
          >
          > Jim
          >
        • m6mfp@sky.com
          Additional: I can t edit my last post but you can find the UHF CB channels here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UHF_CB and you ll have to work out the RX/TX
          Message 4 of 11 , Aug 29, 2013
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            Additional: I can't edit my last post but you can find the UHF CB channels here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/UHF_CB and you'll have to work out the RX/TX frequencies for repeater use but if you use the BaoFeng programming software you can just copy 'n paste the frequencies in, just make sure you get the repeater ones right (different RX/TX), the simplex ones will be easy 'cuz they're the same.
          • Fred
            I also have what appears to be the same antenna but it is labeled Diamond SRH805 and cost more.  It makes my radio an ideal shirt pocket size with effective
            Message 5 of 11 , Aug 29, 2013
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              I also have what appears to be the same antenna but it is labeled Diamond SRH805 and cost more.  It makes my radio an ideal shirt pocket size with effective results at surprising ranges.
              Cheap and cheerful for everyday convenience.

              I think that some reports about antennas (as with many products) relate to visually identical counterfeits that may not work well (and original manufacturer reputations suffer).
               
              Small antennas are truly a compromise and it is best to choose longer antennae designed for the intended frequency band(s).  This will reduce the likelihood of mismatch (even damage) of RF stages and interference to other services.  If you intend a UV-3R for Marine channels, best use it only for listening and transmit - only - in absolute emergency.

              As to the programming cable, best buy it (with drivers) from whoever supplied your radio and can guarantee it works properly - and with your operating system.

              Fred.




              From: LonnieW <n9iui@...>
              To: UV-3R@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Thursday, 29 August 2013, 13:02
              Subject: [UV-3R] Re: Broadcast/Marine/UHF CB

               

              I have that exact same antenna. I'm pretty sure that a wet noodle would work better than that antenna! It's nice for listening to event traffic while you're attending said event, but is deaf otherwise.

              Lonnie, N9IUI

              --- In UV-3R@yahoogroups.com, Jim Kellogg <jim@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hello all,
              >
              > I'm a Australian newbie to this group and need some help. I'm not a ham
              > and purchased a UV-3R to use on Marine channels 156.0500 to 162.0250 and
              > program Australia UHF CB channels 476.4250 to 477.4125 and maybe FM
              > broadcast stations 87.5 to 108.0
              >
              > My question is can I just buy a USB programming cable from China like
              > this one http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/290897413792 or is it more tricky
              > then that to add UHF CB? Can someone refer me to a step by step
              > programming guide?
              >
              > Also do these stubby antennas work about as well as the long stock antenna?
              > http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/181118873940
              >
              > Thanks,
              >
              > Jim
              >



            • No Spam
              A lot has been said about antennas, and it is good and valuable information. But keep one important thing in mind - this is a VERY LOW-powered transmitter, and
              Message 6 of 11 , Aug 29, 2013
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                A lot has been said about antennas, and it is good and valuable information. But keep one important thing in mind - this is a VERY LOW-powered transmitter, and you will be lucky to be heard by someone more than 1 or 2km away even if you can hear them crystal clear where you are standing. This is one thing if you just want to be in casual conversation but a serious problem if you are counting on the radio to communicate in case of an emergency. Part of the reason those other radios are so expensive is that they have a much higher power output, which also requires something more substantial than a cel phone/digital camera battery to power it.

                Not saying they are bad radios; I own six but limit them to close-in (<500 m) use only as an "extender" that let's me operate a much higher-power radio remote from the car in which it is located.

                Matt KE6ALM



                On Aug 29, 2013, at 7:41, Fred <glenndriech@...> wrote:


                I also have what appears to be the same antenna but it is labeled Diamond SRH805 and cost more.  It makes my radio an ideal shirt pocket size with effective results at surprising ranges.
                Cheap and cheerful for everyday convenience.

                I think that some reports about antennas (as with many products) relate to visually identical counterfeits that may not work well (and original manufacturer reputations suffer).
                 
                Small antennas are truly a compromise and it is best to choose longer antennae designed for the intended frequency band(s).  This will reduce the likelihood of mismatch (even damage) of RF stages and interference to other services.  If you intend a UV-3R for Marine channels, best use it only for listening and transmit - only - in absolute emergency.

                As to the programming cable, best buy it (with drivers) from whoever supplied your radio and can guarantee it works properly - and with your operating system.

                Fred.




                From: LonnieW <n9iui@...>
                To: UV-3R@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Thursday, 29 August 2013, 13:02
                Subject: [UV-3R] Re: Broadcast/Marine/UHF CB

                 

                I have that exact same antenna. I'm pretty sure that a wet noodle would work better than that antenna! It's nice for listening to event traffic while you're attending said event, but is deaf otherwise.

                Lonnie, N9IUI

                --- In UV-3R@yahoogroups.com, Jim Kellogg <jim@...> wrote:
                >
                > Hello all,
                >
                > I'm a Australian newbie to this group and need some help. I'm not a ham
                > and purchased a UV-3R to use on Marine channels 156.0500 to 162.0250 and
                > program Australia UHF CB channels 476.4250 to 477.4125 and maybe FM
                > broadcast stations 87.5 to 108.0
                >
                > My question is can I just buy a USB programming cable from China like
                > this one http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/290897413792 or is it more tricky
                > then that to add UHF CB? Can someone refer me to a step by step
                > programming guide?
                >
                > Also do these stubby antennas work about as well as the long stock antenna?
                > http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/181118873940
                >
                > Thanks,
                >
                > Jim
                >



              • Fred
                Just to comment that 1 or 2km range between hand-helds would more apply in built up areas and given that the UV-3R spec is 2 Watts max and so expensive
                Message 7 of 11 , Aug 29, 2013
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                  Just to comment that 1 or 2km range between hand-helds would more apply in built up areas and given that the UV-3R spec is 2 Watts max and "so expensive" radios are rarely more than 5 Watts (and can become hot), the difference in power is less relevant than choice of antenna (also location, height and clear distance between radios). 

                  As emergencies tend to be a matter of failing resources with lessened opportunity to re-charge batteries, it's surely more important to conserve energy by using only enough power to maintain communication for the longest possible time.
                   
                  Fred.



                  From: No Spam <no-spam@...>
                  To: "UV-3R@yahoogroups.com" <UV-3R@yahoogroups.com>
                  Cc: "UV-3R@yahoogroups.com" <UV-3R@yahoogroups.com>
                  Sent: Thursday, 29 August 2013, 16:44
                  Subject: Re: [UV-3R] Re: Broadcast/Marine/UHF CB

                   
                  A lot has been said about antennas, and it is good and valuable information. But keep one important thing in mind - this is a VERY LOW-powered transmitter, and you will be lucky to be heard by someone more than 1 or 2km away even if you can hear them crystal clear where you are standing. This is one thing if you just want to be in casual conversation but a serious problem if you are counting on the radio to communicate in case of an emergency. Part of the reason those other radios are so expensive is that they have a much higher power output, which also requires something more substantial than a cel phone/digital camera battery to power it.

                  Not saying they are bad radios; I own six but limit them to close-in (<500 m) use only as an "extender" that let's me operate a much higher-power radio remote from the car in which it is located.

                  Matt KE6ALM



                  On Aug 29, 2013, at 7:41, Fred <glenndriech@...> wrote:


                  I also have what appears to be the same antenna but it is labeled Diamond SRH805 and cost more.  It makes my radio an ideal shirt pocket size with effective results at surprising ranges.
                  Cheap and cheerful for everyday convenience.

                  I think that some reports about antennas (as with many products) relate to visually identical counterfeits that may not work well (and original manufacturer reputations suffer).
                   
                  Small antennas are truly a compromise and it is best to choose longer antennae designed for the intended frequency band(s).  This will reduce the likelihood of mismatch (even damage) of RF stages and interference to other services.  If you intend a UV-3R for Marine channels, best use it only for listening and transmit - only - in absolute emergency.

                  As to the programming cable, best buy it (with drivers) from whoever supplied your radio and can guarantee it works properly - and with your operating system.

                  Fred.




                  From: LonnieW <n9iui@...>
                  To: UV-3R@yahoogroups.com
                  Sent: Thursday, 29 August 2013, 13:02
                  Subject: [UV-3R] Re: Broadcast/Marine/UHF CB

                   

                  I have that exact same antenna. I'm pretty sure that a wet noodle would work better than that antenna! It's nice for listening to event traffic while you're attending said event, but is deaf otherwise.

                  Lonnie, N9IUI

                  --- In UV-3R@yahoogroups.com, Jim Kellogg <jim@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hello all,
                  >
                  > I'm a Australian newbie to this group and need some help. I'm not a ham
                  > and purchased a UV-3R to use on Marine channels 156.0500 to 162.0250 and
                  > program Australia UHF CB channels 476.4250 to 477.4125 and maybe FM
                  > broadcast stations 87.5 to 108.0
                  >
                  > My question is can I just buy a USB programming cable from China like
                  > this one http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/290897413792 or is it more tricky
                  > then that to add UHF CB? Can someone refer me to a step by step
                  > programming guide?
                  >
                  > Also do these stubby antennas work about as well as the long stock antenna?
                  > http://www.ebay.com.au/itm/181118873940
                  >
                  > Thanks,
                  >
                  > Jim
                  >





                • Jim Kellogg
                  Thanks all who responded. I have ordered the program cable and won t get the stubby. Jim K.
                  Message 8 of 11 , Aug 30, 2013
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                    Thanks all who responded. I have ordered the program cable and won't get
                    the stubby.

                    Jim K.
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