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RD: The Role of American Religious Activists in Uganda Anti-Gay Violence

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  • UMAffirmation
    Recounting (Again) The Role of American Religious Activists in Uganda Anti-Gay Violence Post by Sarah Posner Human Rights First, which last year gave its
    Message 1 of 1 , Jan 29, 2011
      Recounting (Again) The Role of American Religious Activists in Uganda
      Anti-Gay Violence
      Post by Sarah Posner

      Human Rights First, which last year gave its annual award to human rights
      advocate Julius Kaggwa for his work on behalf of sexual minorities, has
      issued a statement on the horrific murder of gay rights advocate David Kato.
      From its statement:

      "The police must carry out a thorough investigation into this attack,
      including into the motives behind the actions of the perpetrator. We are
      concerned by reports that the police may have hastily qualified the attack
      as aggravated robbery. We call on Ugandan President Museveni to send an
      unequivocal signal to Ugandans and to the world, condemning and demanding an
      impartial investigation into the murder, and taking steps to ensure the
      security of LGBTI activists and individuals," said Paul LeGendre, HRF’s
      Fighting Discrimination Program Director.

      David Kato worked as an advocate and litigation officer for Sexual
      Minorities Uganda (SMUG). In October 2010, the Rolling Stone, a self-made
      magazine, included Kato's name in the list of prominent gay rights activists
      and their contact details, with a banner over the photos calling to “Hang
      Them.” A notable supporter of this “initiative” was David Bahati, the
      Ugandan parliamentarian who achieved international notoriety for introducing
      the “Anti-Homosexuality Bill of 2009,” a bill that sought to introduce the
      death penalty for certain same-sex consensual acts. Commenting on
      the Rolling Stone article, Mr. Bahati said that the campaign “would have
      been very helpful to law enforcement of these people; it would have been a
      great source for law enforcement.”

      David Kato was one of three litigants to initiate a court challenge
      to Rolling Stone and on January 3 of this year, the High Court of Uganda
      ruled that the newspaper had violated the plaintiff’s constitutional rights
      to dignity and privacy and issued a permanent injunction.

      The rest of the article is here:
      http://www.religiondispatches.org/dispatches/sarahposner/4120/recounting_%28again%29_the_role_of_american_religious_activists_in_uganda_anti-gay_violence
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