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Bill Hinson, Confessing Movement leader, dies at 68

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    The Rev. William Hinson, a founder and president of the Confessing Movement, died Dec. 26, a month after suffering a massive stroke. Bill Hinson, Confessing
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 28, 2004
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      The Rev. William Hinson, a founder and president of the Confessing
      Movement, died Dec. 26, a month after suffering a massive stroke.

      Bill Hinson, Confessing Movement leader, dies at 68
      Dec. 27, 2004
      By United Methodist News Service

      The Rev. William Hinson, a founder and president of the Confessing
      Movement, died Dec. 26, a month after suffering a massive stroke. He
      was 68.

      A leading conservative voice in the United Methodist Church, Hinson
      helped found the Confessing Movement in 1995 and was serving a two-
      year term as its president when he died.

      "He was a tireless and winsome witness to the apostolic faith," the
      evangelical organization said in a Dec. 26 statement.

      Beyond his role in the Confessing Movement, Hinson led one of the
      denomination's largest congregations for many years, served on United
      Methodist agencies and was active in the World Methodist Council.

      He died at Huntsville (Ala.) Hospital, where he had been since
      suffering a stroke Nov. 28.

      A native of Jeff Davis County, Ga., Hinson began preaching at age 18
      and served at several Georgia churches. He went on to lead First
      United Methodist Church of Houston, one of the denomination's largest
      congregations, for 18 years. After retiring in 2001, he served on the
      staff of First United Methodist Church of Huntsville.

      Hinson was a traditional preacher who emphasized Scriptural authority
      and evangelism, and was involved in missions around the world, said
      the Rev. Don Cross, pastor of First Church in Huntsville.

      "We loved and appreciated having him with us. He was always an asset
      to us," Cross said. "I called it a journey, and it was just too
      short."

      Hinson received degrees from Georgia Southern University, Candler
      School of Theology at Emory University, and Boston University, as
      well as honorary doctorates from Asbury Theological Seminary and
      Houston Graduate School of Theology. Honors included the Denman
      Evangelism Award from the Texas Annual (regional) Conference in 1985
      and the Philip Award for Outstanding Leadership in Evangelism 2000.

      He served on the World Methodist Council's executive and evangelism
      committees. He also had served as president of the Council on Finance
      and Administration, a member of the Board of Global Ministries, a
      trustee for Asbury Seminary, and a delegate to several General and
      jurisdictional conferences. He also wrote several books on
      evangelism, discipleship and other topics.

      Last spring, he addressed the denomination's 2004 General Conference
      in Pittsburgh, when the assembly was abuzz with discussion of a
      possible split over theological differences, particularly with regard
      to issues of sexuality. Hinson and the Rev. Bruce Robbins, former top
      staff executive of the United Methodist Commission on Christian Unity
      and Interreligious Concerns, clarified the details of unofficial
      discussions that had occurred earlier that week between leaders with
      some of the church's advocacy groups.

      After Hinson and Robbins addressed the assembly on May 7, the
      delegates adopted a resolution affirming their intent to remain
      united. A few months later, in September, the Confessing Movement
      issued a statement expressing concern that some people and groups
      were unwilling to abide by the denomination's Book of Discipline and
      were threatening the church's unity.

      Hinson is survived by his wife of 48 years, Jean Laird Hinson, three
      children and 13 grandchildren.

      Visitation was set for Dec. 27 at First United Methodist Church in
      Huntsville, followed by the funeral service Dec. 28.

      # # #

      News media contact: Tim Tanton, Nashville, Tenn. (615) 742-5470 or
      newsdesk@....
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