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mixtures

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  • Tom Ingham
    Hi everyone! From reading everyones comments, I feel very lucky that I (sorry, we) got given a pasta machine as a wedding present! I used to make good pasta
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 13, 1999
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      Hi everyone!
      From reading everyones comments, I feel very lucky that I (sorry, we) got given a pasta machine as a wedding present! I used to make good pasta with it, then I found a better use for it! Oh dear, no more fresh pasta, what a shame...
      Reading the things about air bubbles, I am finding a few problems with premo. I make lots of thin sheets which I cook then cut into tiny squares. It works fine with fimo, but the premo splits and almost shatters when I cut it. Has anyone else experimented using cooked parts made from one type of clay joined to fresh clay of a different make? I've experimented a bit, but I don't know how stable these mixtures will be over time. I love the workability of premo, but the sheets come out better with fimo! I'd love to hear from anyone who mixes clays and what the results are like.

      Bye for now,
      Alison Ingham.
    • Tony & Kerie
      Dear Alison, I think there are two schools of thought on clay mixing. Donna Kato uses all sorts of combinations of clay brands in her work and has for years.
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 13, 1999
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        Dear Alison,

        I think there are two schools of thought on clay mixing. Donna Kato uses all sorts of combinations of clay brands in her work and has for years. On the other hand, I've heard that a chemist friend of someone on the board said that the clays have different formulations and they could degrade one another over time.

        Personally, I've used gold Premo as a decorative edge on Fimo napkin rings. No problems yet, but they're only 3 months old.

        I suppose it all depends on how cautious you are. I'm not a chemist, so I can't say for sure, but PC has been a recognized art form in the US for nearly 20 years, and a whole lot of brand mixing has been going on. I've not heard any adverse comments about it, either -- you'd think the US books (at least the later ones) would mention it if there had been any problems. On the other hand, it could be really disappointing if, in 50 years time, one of your pieces that made it into the British Museum spontaneously disintegrated.

        If you want more info on this, I think Sue Heaser's the one to talk to. I intend to use different brands as they are necessary, and stick with Fimo in the main.

        Kerie
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: Tom Ingham
        To: UKPolyClay@onelist.com
        Sent: 13 November 1999 23:45
        Subject: [UKPolyClay] mixtures


        Hi everyone!
        From reading everyones comments, I feel very lucky that I (sorry, we) got given a pasta machine as a wedding present! I used to make good pasta with it, then I found a better use for it! Oh dear, no more fresh pasta, what a shame...
        Reading the things about air bubbles, I am finding a few problems with premo. I make lots of thin sheets which I cook then cut into tiny squares. It works fine with fimo, but the premo splits and almost shatters when I cut it. Has anyone else experimented using cooked parts made from one type of clay joined to fresh clay of a different make? I've experimented a bit, but I don't know how stable these mixtures will be over time. I love the workability of premo, but the sheets come out better with fimo! I'd love to hear from anyone who mixes clays and what the results are like.

        Bye for now,
        Alison Ingham.
      • Tom Ingham
        Hi everyone, Thanks for all your advice on mixing baked clay of one brand with fresh from another. I ve got a gas oven and usually bake clay at gas mark 1,
        Message 3 of 3 , Nov 17, 1999
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          Hi everyone,
          Thanks for all your advice on mixing baked clay of one brand with fresh from another. I've got a gas oven and usually bake clay at gas mark 1, does anyone know what this converts to in degrees C? (I just guessed at gas mark 1, but no probs. so far with baking).
          I think the reason I'm cautious about baking is my oven is a bit 'iffy' and either incinerates or undercooks; Delia Smith would not be impressed by some of our meals!

          I've got to deliver my work to the gallery on Sunday, so I'm trying to do a Speedy Gonzales impression and get a few extra things done. I'm in a Giger phase at the moment (the chap that did the weird things in the 'Alien' films). So my things look a bit like technological seahorses (I think that sort of describes the effect!) and I'm using my explosive alluminium powder, having taken on board the comments raised a few weeks ago about powder on black and 'tarnish' in the gaps, and I like the effect a lot.

          Bye for now, (my husband has just told me tea is ready... I wonder if it will be over or under done???)
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