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RE: What I'm up to

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  • ShelleyM
    I think the difference between a pier and a quay is that a pier sticks out into the sea, but a quay runs alongside the water - or at least the one in Poole
    Message 1 of 14 , Oct 19, 2002
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      I think the difference between a pier and a quay is that a pier sticks out
      into the sea, but a quay runs alongside the water - or at least the one in
      Poole does.

      My dictionary says ' Quay - Solid stationary artifical landing-place usually
      of stone or iron, lying alongside or projecting into water for (un)-loading
      ships.'

      A pier is similar 'solid structure of stone etc. extending into sea or tidal
      river to protect or enclose a harbour. Structure of iron or wood open below
      running out into sea or lake and used as promenade and landing stage.'

      I was curious as to what a Marina was as well, my dictionary says a Marina
      is a pleasure boat harbour.

      http://www.poolequay.com/ - to see Poole Quay! Oh and it's pronounced 'key'

      Shelley
      www.shelleym.co.uk
    • Alan Vernall
      I m getting confused If Poole is the St Tropez of the south coast and Croyden is the NewYork of London(according to the Croyden Film Board this week) I m
      Message 2 of 14 , Oct 19, 2002
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        I'm getting confused

        If Poole is the St Tropez of the south coast and Croyden is the
        NewYork of London(according to the Croyden Film Board this week)

        I'm surprised You and Emma still call yourselves English.


        Alan
        (come to Macclesfield, the Chernobyl of Cheshire)




        --- In UKPolyClay@y..., "ShelleyM" <shelleymcloughlin@b...> wrote:
        > I think the difference between a pier and a quay is that a pier
        sticks out
        > into the sea, but a quay runs alongside the water - or at least the
        one in
        > Poole does.
        >
        > My dictionary says ' Quay - Solid stationary artifical landing-
        place usually
        > of stone or iron, lying alongside or projecting into water for (un)-
        loading
        > ships.'
        >
        > A pier is similar 'solid structure of stone etc. extending into sea
        or tidal
        > river to protect or enclose a harbour. Structure of iron or wood
        open below
        > running out into sea or lake and used as promenade and landing
        stage.'
        >
        > I was curious as to what a Marina was as well, my dictionary says a
        Marina
        > is a pleasure boat harbour.
        >
        > http://www.poolequay.com/ - to see Poole Quay! Oh and it's
        pronounced 'key'
        >
        > Shelley
        > www.shelleym.co.uk
      • ShelleyM
        Hey Alan whoever said I call myself English? I m a mongrel didn t ya know! Born here - yes, but father is Greek Cypriot and Mother is of Russian parentage, so
        Message 3 of 14 , Oct 21, 2002
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          Hey Alan whoever said I call myself English? I'm a mongrel didn't ya know!

          Born here - yes, but father is Greek Cypriot and Mother is of Russian
          parentage, so I'm definitely a weirdy! Common language as I was growing up
          was English. My Russian grandmother lived with us and it was the only
          language my father could communicate with her in - my Mum and Gran would
          speak to each other in Yiddish quite a bit! Weekends we used to have my
          Swiss Aunt, or Austrian Aunt visit us, and French cousins quite often
          (no-one spoke French, they spoke in Yiddish or English!). But although I
          heard, all sorts of languages I only ever learnt English. Now that was more
          than you wanted to know!

          Shelley
          www.shelleym.co.uk
        • Mortsbeads@aol.com
          In a message dated 21/10/02 16:14:13 GMT Daylight Time, ... LOL Shelley, I am the same as you, half Yemenite, half Russian, I know all about the Yiddish spoken
          Message 4 of 14 , Oct 21, 2002
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            In a message dated 21/10/02 16:14:13 GMT Daylight Time,
            shelleymcloughlin@... writes:


            > Hey Alan whoever said I call myself English? I'm a mongrel didn't ya know!

            LOL Shelley, I am the same as you, half Yemenite, half Russian, I know all
            about the
            Yiddish spoken in our house, it was used so we kids didn't understand what
            the elders were saying, little did they know, we did understand :) So Shelly
            what does that make us? English, British or what :)
            Linda
            <A HREF="http://www.geocities.com/SoHo/Atrium/1643/">Morticia's Magical Bead Tour</A>


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Katherine Dewey <kadewey@elvenwork.com>
            That s the best malachite I ve seen. Do it in blue for Azurite, and try blue/green blends for azurite metamorphising into malachite. I think cross cuts of
            Message 5 of 14 , Jan 12, 2003
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              That's the best malachite I've seen. Do it in blue for Azurite, and
              try blue/green blends for azurite metamorphising into malachite. I
              think cross cuts of howlite have the same spherical structure.

              Katherine Dewey...a die hard rock hound who's taken more petrology and
              mineralogy classes than art classes.

              http://www.elvenwork.com

              --- In UKPolyClay@yahoogroups.com, "Alan Vernall" <av@d...> wrote:
              > OK - I'll put in my two penn'oth.
              >
              > I've been playing about for some time with semi-precious stones in
              > clay - so far, I've tried Lapis and Malachite.
              >
              > Of the two I like the malachite better (mainly because it's much
              > easier to photograph)
              >
              > http://groups.msn.com/AlanJamesV/canework.msnw?
              > action=ShowPhoto&PhotoID=97
              >
              > In case anyone wants to use the method, I've loaded a series of
              'how-
              > to' photos with explanatory titles(I hope) at the site too.
              >
              > http://groups.msn.com/AlanJamesV/malachitecane.msnw
              >
              > Oh yes - I've been making insects and flowers too!
              >
              > Alan
            • Alan Vernall <av@dsl.pipex.com>
              Thanks Katherine, Also, someone at another group I belong to suggested the whole palette could be changed to shades of brown and would make a good burl-walnut
              Message 6 of 14 , Jan 13, 2003
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                Thanks Katherine,

                Also, someone at another group I belong to suggested the whole
                palette could be changed to shades of brown and would make a good
                burl-walnut in clay.

                Yes - I did a fair bit of rockhounding in my youth - almost got
                some 'Blue John' fluorite complex from Castleton in Derbyshire - but
                I was put off by the patrol guards,and large dogs. Doing it this way,
                in clay is definitely safer!

                Alan

                --- In UKPolyClay@yahoogroups.com, "Katherine Dewey <kadewey@e...>"
                <kadewey@e...> wrote:
                > That's the best malachite I've seen. Do it in blue for Azurite,
                and
                > try blue/green blends for azurite metamorphising into malachite. I
                > think cross cuts of howlite have the same spherical structure.
                >
                > Katherine Dewey...a die hard rock hound who's taken more petrology
                and
                > mineralogy classes than art classes.
                >
                > http://www.elvenwork.com
                >
                > --- In UKPolyClay@yahoogroups.com, "Alan Vernall" <av@d...> wrote:
                > > OK - I'll put in my two penn'oth.
                > >
                > > I've been playing about for some time with semi-precious stones
                in
                > > clay - so far, I've tried Lapis and Malachite.
                > >
                > > Of the two I like the malachite better (mainly because it's much
                > > easier to photograph)
                > >
                > > http://groups.msn.com/AlanJamesV/canework.msnw?
                > > action=ShowPhoto&PhotoID=97
                > >
                > > In case anyone wants to use the method, I've loaded a series of
                > 'how-
                > > to' photos with explanatory titles(I hope) at the site too.
                > >
                > > http://groups.msn.com/AlanJamesV/malachitecane.msnw
                > >
                > > Oh yes - I've been making insects and flowers too!
                > >
                > > Alan
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