Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

A journey without distance

Expand Messages
  • Eric Theeman
    Huggie, do you know the way to enlightenment? If you do, I ask the following question: What are you doing? Scott Yes, I reckon I know the way to enlightenment;
    Message 1 of 10 , Jun 4, 2006
      Huggie, do you know the way to enlightenment?

      If you do, I ask the following question: What are you doing?

      Scott
              Yes, I reckon I know the way to enlightenment; I have been a-watching it for a v. long time. I also know the way to San Jose and the way to Amarillo but getting there and living there is different.
              Doing? I am doing much less meditating than I was , because the Zendo is 15 miles away and my son blew up my car. Also I have a crook lower back now, which only bites me when I walk a distance or do Zazen.
              I am doing more of watching that I live and act according to my idea of how an enlightened person would. I am not concerned with negative emotions; if they arise; shortly, they will ceast to arise, with little worry or effort from me.
             I serve where I can. I run a TaiChi class in the hospital where I am incarcerated.. I have seen old people freeze up and get bed ridden from having no exercise.
             I have never done TaiChi myself. I learnt it from the free video at www.taichi18.com I highly recommend  TaiChi (QiGong) they compliment  Zazen.
      Huggie
    • Scott Hutton
      Eric, Of course there is no distance to enlightenment because nothing changes... Has anyone ever told you that you think too much? Relax, take a seat, and let
      Message 2 of 10 , Jun 5, 2006

        Eric,

        Of course there is no distance to enlightenment because nothing changes...

        Has anyone ever told you that you think too much?

        Relax, take a seat, and let ideological tyrannies come and go instead of ruling your life.

        Why *act like* you are enlightened when you can *be* enlightened?

        Scott

      • Scott
        Eric, Of course there is no distance to enlightenment because nothing changes... Has anyone ever told you that you think too much? Relax, take a seat, and let
        Message 3 of 10 , Jun 5, 2006
          Eric,

          Of course there is no distance to enlightenment because nothing changes...

          Has anyone ever told you that you think too much?

          Relax, take a seat, and let ideological tyrannies (and teachers that
          think you be anything OTHER than enlightened) come and go instead of
          ruling your life.

          Who would prefer to *act* like something they aren't when you can just
          be enlightened instead?

          <Whatever happens if an actor becomes enlightened?>

          Scott
        • Richard Horvitz
          ... Do you think anyone ever told Albert Einstein that he thought too much? Albert, too much theorizing, just take a seat! Probably some people who didn t
          Message 4 of 10 , Jun 5, 2006
            On Mon, 5 Jun 2006, Scott wrote:

            > Eric,
            >
            > Of course there is no distance to enlightenment because nothing changes...
            >
            > Has anyone ever told you that you think too much?
            >

            Do you think anyone ever told Albert Einstein that he thought too much?
            "Albert, too much theorizing, just take a seat!"
            Probably some people who didn't understand what he was talking about.
            Now Einstein was unusual but this just means that those of us who are less
            talented have to think harder.
            There is nothing wrong with thinking, or with doing lots of thinking.
            If a person was walking into walls would you suggest that he walks too
            much or that maybe he needs glasses?
            The thinking process can have problems such as being motivated by
            obsessive fear or craving, but in general thinking too much is not the
            problem - thinking too little is.
          • petasz@softel.com.pl
            ... .....Indeed, there is nothing to be attained; the Bodhisattvas live this deepest wisdom with no hindrance in the mind, no hindrance therefore no fear.
            Message 5 of 10 , Jun 5, 2006
              > "Albert,


              .....Indeed, there is nothing to be attained; the Bodhisattvas live this
              deepest wisdom ' with no hindrance in the mind, no hindrance therefore no
              fear. Far beyond delusive thinking....

              (though crosswords are demanding)
            • --Michael
              I might add there s a dearth of critical thinking in the world. More skepticism and questioning would be a welcome improvement. To no one s surprise,
              Message 6 of 10 , Jun 5, 2006
                I might add there's a dearth of critical thinking in the world.

                More skepticism and questioning would be a welcome improvement.

                To no one's surprise, authorities resist that with various means, some
                less humane than others.


                --Michael


                --- Richard Horvitz <rhorvitz@...> wrote:

                [snip]

                > The thinking process can have problems such as being motivated by
                > obsessive fear or craving, but in general thinking too much is not
                > the problem - thinking too little is.


                __________________________________________________
                Do You Yahoo!?
                Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                http://mail.yahoo.com
              • Pat Stacy
                ... I was thinking about this line in the heart sutra today. My translation is slightly different. Without any hindrance, no fear exists. Here are the
                Message 7 of 10 , Jun 5, 2006
                  > .....Indeed, there is nothing to be attained; the Bodhisattvas live this
                  > deepest wisdom ' with no hindrance in the mind, no hindrance therefore no
                  > fear. Far beyond delusive thinking....

                  I was thinking about this line in the heart sutra today. My translation is
                  slightly different.
                  "Without any hindrance, no fear exists." Here are the questions I wrote
                  down:
                  What is the connection between hindrances and fear?
                  Buddhism speaks frequently about hindrances, how do we recognize them?
                  When we do recognize one, how do we deal with it?

                  Pat
                • Scott Hutton
                  Richard wrote: Do you think anyone ever told Albert Einstein that he thought too much? Albert, too much theorizing, just take a seat! ___________________ No,
                  Message 8 of 10 , Jun 6, 2006

                    Richard wrote:


                    Do you think anyone ever told Albert Einstein that he thought too much?
                    "Albert, too much theorizing, just take a seat!"

                    ___________________

                    No, I don’t think anyone told him he thought too much because/and/or he did not ask them *what to think*. And statistical analysis, and science, have only been of benefit. I’m awfully glad he did not listen to too many of his teachers. He simply thought his thoughts, which is what they are for after all.

                    Secondly, his ideas were not initially met with very much acceptance. They were regarded except by a very elite few as quaint, but garbage, for years. Only his Brownian motion theories gained rapid acceptance. I’m quite sure some people were wishing he would *start* thinking.

                     

                     

                    Scott

                     

                  • Scott Hutton
                    I ve been thinking about hindrances too. Isn t fear a manifestation of aversion? (therefore without the hindrance of aversion, fear is impossible?)Scott
                    Message 9 of 10 , Jun 6, 2006
                      I've been thinking about hindrances too.
                      Isn't fear a manifestation of aversion? (therefore without the hindrance of
                      aversion, fear is impossible?)

                      Scott


                      Send instant messages to your online friends http://au.messenger.yahoo.com
                    • --Michael
                      Einstein had solid mathematical backing for his theories (e.g., Riemannian geometry), and not just his own calculations. He didn t do his theories all alone.
                      Message 10 of 10 , Jun 6, 2006
                        Einstein had solid mathematical backing for his theories (e.g.,
                        Riemannian geometry), and not just his own calculations. He didn't do
                        his theories all alone. It is debatable how much his wife helped, as I
                        recall.

                        Likewise, Max Planck's ideas (the quantum unit) were initially denied
                        by the scientific establishment, despite clear experimental
                        verification of integral units of energy from heated "black bodies."

                        I believe Planck said for an idea to be accepted the current generation
                        of scientists has to pass on.

                        One other example: the scientists that proved certain types of ulcers
                        were caused by bacteria went against medical dogma, so experimented
                        upon themselves to prove the theory. Dangerous, but it worked.

                        Bringing the discussion a bit back to Zen, I watched a documentary on
                        The Weather Underground, the underground radical group of the 70s and
                        80s. One member said going "underground" was more of a state of mind
                        than disguise.

                        She hadn't changed locations or appearance significantly, but her
                        friends did not recognize her anymore because they'd heard she had gone
                        underground so they didn't recognize her even in plain sight.

                        The power of suggestion...


                        --Michael

                        --- Scott Hutton <scott_1971_h@...> wrote:

                        [snip]

                        > No, I don't think anyone told him he thought too much because/and/or
                        he did not ask them *what to think*. And statistical analysis, and
                        science, have been of benefit. I'm awfully glad he did not listen to
                        too many of his teachers. He simply thought his thoughts, which is what
                        they are for after all.
                        >
                        > Secondly, his ideas were not initially met with very much acceptance.
                        They were regarded except by a very elite few as quaint, but garbage,
                        for years. Only his Brownian motion theories gained rapid acceptance.
                        I'm quite sure some people were wishing he would *start* thinking.
                        >


                        __________________________________________________
                        Do You Yahoo!?
                        Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
                        http://mail.yahoo.com
                      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.