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BBBB1200 Mk1/2

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  • angusbain2000
    Hi, i have a friend who is interested in purchasing a Trophy 1200 (not the latest one s) i do know the Mk1 puts out more Hp than the Mk2. Ive also read
    Message 1 of 7 , Oct 14, 2013
      Hi, i have a friend who is interested in purchasing a Trophy 1200 (not the latest one's) 

      i do know the Mk1 puts out more Hp than the Mk2. Ive also read comments the mk1 drinks like fish, does the Mk2? a part from looks, are the motors basically the same? is the Mk2 a much better bike? is one heavier than another? brakes similar? suspension similar? or is it a flip of coin? thanks. 
    • Ken Hastie
      Anyone who has this sort of concern with the Trophy 1200 should be looking elsewhere. Ken Hastie Triumph Trophy 1200, BSA A75 Rocket Three, A10 Golden Flash,
      Message 2 of 7 , Oct 14, 2013

        Anyone who has this sort of concern with the Trophy 1200 should be looking elsewhere.

         

         

        Ken Hastie
        Triumph Trophy 1200, BSA A75 Rocket Three, A10 Golden Flash, B40 350cc, D10 and D14 Bantams
         

         

         

         

        From: TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com

         

        Ive also read comments the mk1 drinks like fish, does the Mk2?

         

      • gp904
        Should be looking elsewhere?? It s quite a sound idea to have questions regarding a possible purchase of a bike you re comparing to another. ... Anyone who
        Message 3 of 7 , Nov 15, 2013

          Should be looking elsewhere??  It's quite a sound idea to have questions regarding a possible purchase of a bike you're comparing to another. 



          ---In triumphtrophy@yahoogroups.com, <ken@...> wrote:

          Anyone who has this sort of concern with the Trophy 1200 should be looking elsewhere.

           

           

          Ken Hastie
          Triumph Trophy 1200, BSA A75 Rocket Three, A10 Golden Flash, B40 350cc, D10 and D14 Bantams
           

           

           

           

          From: TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com

           

          Ive also read comments the mk1 drinks like fish, does the Mk2?

           

        • stevec1200brg
          Before I bought my y2k 1200 BRG in 2003 I looked at a photograph of every motorcycle then in production. I bought the Triumph because I liked it the most. I
          Message 4 of 7 , Nov 17, 2013

            Before I bought my y2k 1200 BRG in 2003 I looked at a photograph of every motorcycle then in production.


            I bought the Triumph because I liked it the most.


            I still think it's the best motorcycle available today - 11 years later!


            But I don't know anything worth knowing about bikes so don't listen to my opinion!



            ---In triumphtrophy@yahoogroups.com, <gp904@...> wrote:

            Should be looking elsewhere??  It's quite a sound idea to have questions regarding a possible purchase of a bike you're comparing to another. 



            ---In triumphtrophy@yahoogroups.com, <ken@...> wrote:

            Anyone who has this sort of concern with the Trophy 1200 should be looking elsewhere.

             

             

            Ken Hastie
            Triumph Trophy 1200, BSA A75 Rocket Three, A10 Golden Flash, B40 350cc, D10 and D14 Bantams
             

             

             

             

            From: TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com

             

            Ive also read comments the mk1 drinks like fish, does the Mk2?

             

          • Jack Byers
            ... Wow, talk about getting down to the brass tacks of things! Ken is right. The early Trophys were really meant to be sport-bikes. In 1995, when I bought my
            Message 5 of 7 , Nov 18, 2013

              On Nov 17, 2013, at 1:53 PM, <stevec1200brg@...> wrote:

               

              Before I bought my y2k 1200 BRG in 2003 I looked at a photograph of every motorcycle then in production.


              I bought the Triumph because I liked it the most.


              I still think it's the best motorcycle available today - 11 years later!

              Howdy Friend,

                      Wow, talk about getting down to the brass tacks of things! Ken is right. The early Trophys were really meant to be sport-bikes. In 1995, when I bought my BBBB-BRG, I was needing a new bike, as I used it to get to my several job sites (Psychologist working with brain injured, and retarded). It had to be dependable and handle well in tight traffic. My hands hurt the first time I rode the Daytona 1200, but like Little Red Riding Hood, the Trophy 900 fit me just right. I could actually feel the "British bendt" It had that unmistakable Triumph Motorcycle feel. If I didn't look down, it felt amazingly like a Trophy 500 twin I'd briefly owned in the '60s. That bike carried its weight high up feeling to me also. It felt comfortable and familiar. Also, I wanted to put my money where my mouth was, and actually contribute to the reemergence of the Marquis. I was fully aware of the fact that new bikes always have a few teething problems. This particular model was their top of the line road bike, and I was not under any illusions. As it turned out we owners have been able to ferret out those personality issues with real useable fixes. They were mostly simple things we could accomplish on our own. Luckily we have amongst our ranks the technical wherewithal to arrive at real fixes that result in a bullet proof motor, in a very good frame and style (two styles actually), first came the sportbike with that huge 1200 cc motor. We added Givi Bags and racks, raised the bars a bit, and has a viable 140 mph sportbike with saddlebags. Perfect! Now 18 years later, I can still in all honesty say I've not seen another I'd rather have for my only bike. I had a Honda 250 Trials bike for "rubber-neckin' in the wilds of California." A neighbor of mine wanted it so bad, he talked me out of it before moving on. It would have been easy to put some lights on that bike, and with a bit of sport-bike rubber and a horn, that would be a great urban assault vehicle. I wish I'd never sold it now, and I don't think the neighbor is still in Ca. The bottom line to this is simply, if you are a bit creative, and like fussing with the bits and pieces of a motor bike that can safely take you from point A to point B at a literally inexcusably high rate of speed, for not a lot of money, you are at the right place. If you're wanting turn-key perfection, cobble another $25K(+) together, and buy a Ducati "Tetrafongula" 1122 desmoguitartro, and you'll even get a satellite hookup, and games on the center-screen of the electronic display to keep boredom at bay while you wait for the van to arrive. 
                   I have not had any big issues or problems with my '95 Trophy, but I do take good even excellent care of it. I want it to last the rest of my days. When I have to take the keys to a Vespa scooter, I'm going to drain the gas out of my Trophy, and park it in my living room right next to the big flat screen, and pass it on to my grandson. I've saved the stock handlebar parts, and the weak EOM horns. Thats all I've changed on the bike. This thing is certainly good for 200K miles if it's well treated. You choose. I've never seen another just like mine yet, and my Trophy4 is almost a stocker. The necessary improvements were: 1)Horns, 2) RaceTech front suspension, 3) get better pads EBC, or Galpher, and braided steel lines long enough to fit a range of handlebars 4) mount regular handlebars 5) mount right side Euro-switch-gear (headlite switch), 6) change to a 190/50 z17 rear tire, and raise the front tubes one inch, to right the ride height for the lower rear tire height. 7) mount plastic front shields on fork legs. 8) made "U" shaped brackets for front blinkers. Thus short stalked  (very cheap) blinkers may be quickly changed out when you tip over and break those expensive OEM blinkers! I have always run Mobil-1 synthetic oil, since the 6K miles check-up. Not the Mobil-1T. The regular Mobil-1 is fine. No slipping clutch problems. I get right at 250 miles before going on reserve 9) I put an Aluminum "Original (very famous manufacturer who now holds Public Office) Petrol Knob". Aside from the RaceTech front end, surely the best mod I have made! The OEM knob is a complete and total embarrassment, to use such a cheap piece of junk on a premium priced motorcycle. Shamefully inadequate indeed. At least my old '95 was built in the UK. I wonder what models Triumph hasn't outsourced to China, India, or Taiwan ? For pity sakes at least have them built in the West somewhere. Is there any unemployment in the UK anywhere? Where did they say the new $17K Trophy was built? The wiring job done on my '95 was horrible. There was bare copper and loose wires everywhere. I had to go thru and redo most splices on the machine. As was, the factory job would never do. I wonder if the job in '95 would even pass muster today? I still have a good time sitting and gazing at this thing of beauty. The lines are curved and graceful so organic in Nature. No flat facures, and pointy plastic lines. Now the "Trophy" line has morphed into three very different bikes (four if you count the 1200/4!). Me, I liked the early MK/1 bikes. I was still in my 40's, and had one really fast big bike left in me. (11) Corbin Saddle. Well I went around on my '79 BMW R100rt to every shop that had a demo I could ride. It was "tight shoes" nobody would let me ride a $10,000.00 bike, except Matt Cappri at Southcoast Triumph, and Evan at Irv Seaver BMW. I couldn't find either a Kawasaki Concours, or the Honda ST1100 to try. The BMWs weren't impressively fast at all, but the Triumph triple really made me smile BIG. If three could do that then four will be better! Now I don't regret getting the four at all. It made mine all the more rare and uncommon. I still get questions like "is this the new Triumph?" All the time. BTW HAPPY THANKSGIVING AMERICA!!!!!

               Kindest regards,
                 Poppa Jack

              Should be looking elsewhere??  It's quite a sound idea to have questions regarding a possible purchase of a bike you're comparing to another. 



              ---In triumphtrophy@yahoogroups.com, <ken@...> wrote:

              Anyone who has this sort of concern with the Trophy 1200 should be looking elsewhere.

               
               

              Ken Hastie
              Triumph Trophy 1200, BSA A75 Rocket Three, A10 Golden Flash, B40 350cc, D10 and D14 Bantams
               

               
               
               

              From: TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com

               

              Ive also read comments the mk1 drinks like fish, does the Mk2?

               


            • djacarr@sky.com
              Hello Jack   Triumph has factories in the UK and Thailand.   If I recall correctly, UK makes bikes for Europe and the US, the Thailand bikes are for the
              Message 6 of 7 , Nov 18, 2013
                Hello Jack
                 
                Triumph has factories in the UK and Thailand.
                 
                If I recall correctly, UK makes bikes for Europe and the US, the Thailand bikes are for the Asia-Pac region (approximately).
                 
                Although I wouldn't be surprised to hear at some point that the UK plants will close down and all production move overseas.
                 Just my 2p worth...
                 
                My bike is a 94 1200 in Caspian blue (definitely the fasted colour :) ) and is almost entirely stock. The only changes I have made have been for safety - I, too, have swapped out the feeble horns for something more truck-like :). After having had cars change lanes when I've been right beside and it being clear the driver didn't hear my original horns I felt it was a must.
                 
                I've also changed the front brake lines for stainless braided ones. I will be doing the same on the back brake when I overhaul the caliper in the new year.
                 
                David
                From: Jack Byers <jackbyers@...>
                To: TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Monday, 18 November 2013, 15:45
                Subject: Re: [TriumphTrophy] RE: BBBB1200 Mk1/2
                 

                On Nov 17, 2013, at 1:53 PM, <stevec1200brg@...> wrote:
                 

                Before I bought my y2k 1200 BRG in 2003 I looked at a photograph of every motorcycle then in production.

                I bought the Triumph because I liked it the most.

                I still think it's the best motorcycle available today - 11 years later!
                Howdy Friend,
                        Wow, talk about getting down to the brass tacks of things! Ken is right. The early Trophys were really meant to be sport-bikes. In 1995, when I bought my BBBB-BRG, I was needing a new bike, as I used it to get to my several job sites (Psychologist working with brain injured, and retarded). It had to be dependable and handle well in tight traffic. My hands hurt the first time I rode the Daytona 1200, but like Little Red Riding Hood, the Trophy 900 fit me just right. I could actually feel the "British bendt" It had that unmistakable Triumph Motorcycle feel. If I didn't look down, it felt amazingly like a Trophy 500 twin I'd briefly owned in the '60s. That bike carried its weight high up feeling to me also. It felt comfortable and familiar. Also, I wanted to put my money where my mouth was, and actually contribute to the reemergence of the Marquis. I was fully aware of the fact that new bikes always have a few teething problems. This particular model was their top of the line road bike, and I was not under any illusions. As it turned out we owners have been able to ferret out those personality issues with real useable fixes. They were mostly simple things we could accomplish on our own. Luckily we have amongst our ranks the technical wherewithal to arrive at real fixes that result in a bullet proof motor, in a very good frame and style (two styles actually), first came the sportbike with that huge 1200 cc motor. We added Givi Bags and racks, raised the bars a bit, and has a viable 140 mph sportbike with saddlebags. Perfect! Now 18 years later, I can still in all honesty say I've not seen another I'd rather have for my only bike. I had a Honda 250 Trials bike for "rubber-neckin' in the wilds of California." A neighbor of mine wanted it so bad, he talked me out of it before moving on. It would have been easy to put some lights on that bike, and with a bit of sport-bike rubber and a horn, that would be a great urban assault vehicle. I wish I'd never sold it now, and I don't think the neighbor is still in Ca. The bottom line to this is simply, if you are a bit creative, and like fussing with the bits and pieces of a motor bike that can safely take you from point A to point B at a literally inexcusably high rate of speed, for not a lot of money, you are at the right place. If you're wanting turn-key perfection, cobble another $25K(+) together, and buy a Ducati "Tetrafongula" 1122 desmoguitartro, and you'll even get a satellite hookup, and games on the center-screen of the electronic display to keep boredom at bay while you wait for the van to arrive. 
                     I have not had any big issues or problems with my '95 Trophy, but I do take good even excellent care of it. I want it to last the rest of my days. When I have to take the keys to a Vespa scooter, I'm going to drain the gas out of my Trophy, and park it in my living room right next to the big flat screen, and pass it on to my grandson. I've saved the stock handlebar parts, and the weak EOM horns. Thats all I've changed on the bike. This thing is certainly good for 200K miles if it's well treated. You choose. I've never seen another just like mine yet, and my Trophy4 is almost a stocker. The necessary improvements were: 1)Horns, 2) RaceTech front suspension, 3) get better pads EBC, or Galpher, and braided steel lines long enough to fit a range of handlebars 4) mount regular handlebars 5) mount right side Euro-switch-gear (headlite switch), 6) change to a 190/50 z17 rear tire, and raise the front tubes one inch, to right the ride height for the lower rear tire height. 7) mount plastic front shields on fork legs. 8) made "U" shaped brackets for front blinkers. Thus short stalked  (very cheap) blinkers may be quickly changed out when you tip over and break those expensive OEM blinkers! I have always run Mobil-1 synthetic oil, since the 6K miles check-up. Not the Mobil-1T. The regular Mobil-1 is fine. No slipping clutch problems. I get right at 250 miles before going on reserve 9) I put an Aluminum "Original (very famous manufacturer who now holds Public Office) Petrol Knob". Aside from the RaceTech front end, surely the best mod I have made! The OEM knob is a complete and total embarrassment, to use such a cheap piece of junk on a premium priced motorcycle. Shamefully inadequate indeed. At least my old '95 was built in the UK. I wonder what models Triumph hasn't outsourced to China, India, or Taiwan ? For pity sakes at least have them built in the West somewhere. Is there any unemployment in the UK anywhere? Where did they say the new $17K Trophy was built? The wiring job done on my '95 was horrible. There was bare copper and loose wires everywhere. I had to go thru and redo most splices on the machine. As was, the factory job would never do. I wonder if the job in '95 would even pass muster today? I still have a good time sitting and gazing at this thing of beauty. The lines are curved and graceful so organic in Nature. No flat facures, and pointy plastic lines. Now the "Trophy" line has morphed into three very different bikes (four if you count the 1200/4!). Me, I liked the early MK/1 bikes. I was still in my 40's, and had one really fast big bike left in me. (11) Corbin Saddle. Well I went around on my '79 BMW R100rt to every shop that had a demo I could ride. It was "tight shoes" nobody would let me ride a $10,000.00 bike, except Matt Cappri at Southcoast Triumph, and Evan at Irv Seaver BMW. I couldn't find either a Kawasaki Concours, or the Honda ST1100 to try. The BMWs weren't impressively fast at all, but the Triumph triple really made me smile BIG. If three could do that then four will be better! Now I don't regret getting the four at all. It made mine all the more rare and uncommon. I still get questions like "is this the new Triumph?" All the time. BTW HAPPY THANKSGIVING AMERICA!!!!!

                 Kindest regards,
                   Poppa Jack

              • Jack Byers
                ... Hello there Mate, The elegant simplicity in the big four cylinder engine, and a basic Brick and mortar gear that went on my 95 really impressed me, and
                Message 7 of 7 , Nov 19, 2013

                  On Nov 18, 2013, at 9:37 AM, djacarr@... wrote:

                   

                  Hello Jack
                   
                  Triumph has factories in the UK and Thailand.


                  Hello there Mate, 
                    The elegant simplicity in the big four cylinder engine, and a basic "Brick and mortar" gear that went on my '95 really impressed me, and the fact that it didn't have 32 computers on board, just a few well placed micro-switches. To overhaul, or not to overhaul, is the real question. I'd always fear that I was buying someone else's head aches. But if I knew the previous owner, and knew the bike wasn't hard crashed or anything like that, I'd give it consideration.
                  Kindest regards,


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