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Re: Overheating

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  • samthesidecar
    A bit more info: Clutch sorted - fluid resembled mud & return hole in master cylinder blocked, replied to feller who guessed it right. Fork seals sorted in
    Message 1 of 37 , Jul 18, 2013
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      A bit more info:
      Clutch sorted - fluid resembled mud & return hole in master cylinder blocked, replied to feller who guessed it right.
      Fork seals sorted in full sun - bad move.

      Bike is 1992 900. Was stored 7 years, previous to that has service history (serviced about 200 miles before I bought it.

      No overtemp light that I can see in the block, I have (from top left):
      Oil Press,Low fuel, Neutral, Stand & High beam.
      Temp gauge coming up about 1/3 of travel (about the same distance as the red sector covers at the other end) - normal?

      Fan was cutting in, but then stopped (I thought), so now running on a manual switch - don't want to do head gasket!

      Cleaned already clean carbs today, possibly 1 pilot jet blocked.
      Running not improved!

      Dropped coolant (half onto legs & feet) - fairly clean, a wee bit of oil (washed off the case I think). Thermostat operates in a pan of boiling water.

      So; Paranoid rider not used to hot engine, who should suspect coils or crank position sensor (what's one of those - cigarette paper & points man I'd get the BSA out but that doesn't want to play either!)

      Any other pointers?

      Great forum with loads of helpful folks, I came from GPz305 forum which like my Kawasaki was dying a slow lingering death.

      Thanks folks,
      Sam.



      -- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "Greg" <gandrews@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi Sam,
      > I was reading some of your previous posts about the clutch and forks. Buying a bike that has been sitting for some time can have its share of problems, but after you get it all sorted out you will be smiling and have learned a lot about your bike.
      > This group is the right place to be while needing help.
      > Is the clutch problem fixed? Changing oil was the best first step.
      >
      > The bike getting warm in the summer is nothing new, so do we. Looking at the radiator and seeing if there is debris is the first step, hose it off.
      >
      > Next does the radiator fan run? Hard to tell while the engine is running. The fan will continue to run when the engine is stopped until the engine cools down.
      >
      > There are two places to check for coolant when the bike is cold. Under the radiator cap, but getting to it is not so easy with the side fairing in place. So I first the check the coolant reservoir tank, it is under the seat behind the battery. If this level is good, there is no need to go after the radiator cap.
      >
      > Having the temp light glow at tick over is not out of the ordinary. Mine has done that for a number of years. If I know I'll be sitting a while waiting for a green I turn the engine off. These bikes weren't made to idle quietly.
      >
      > Now the misfiring and engine stop. You don't know what kind of maintenance your bike has received over the years, so assume the previous owner didn't do any, or he was a knucklehead and only did things to screw it up.
      >
      > Above the valve cover is what they call a heat shield. These heat shields also holds down a thick foam barrier. The foam barrier has notches for the engine harness and spark plug wires to pass thru. If the foam barrier is gone, engine heat will pass thru and cook those 3 coils and the family jewels. Ed Johnson can tell you all about it. Coils that are over 10 years old are living on borrowed time, and if they have been cooked, the time is less. My guess is your misfire is coming from the coils or spark plug wires. The Haynes manual tells how to check coils and wires, but then it is not all that accurate. Have you got a friend that will let you try out his coils and wires. Oh one other thing, I never pull the spark plug wire out of the coil. I don't want to break the wire, they are not cheap. eBay is my friend.
      >
      > The engine stop is most likely the crank shaft position sensor. Someone on the group said the tach needle while drop to zero when the sensor fails. I've been too busy looking how pull over to the shoulder of the road than watch the tach when it has happened to me. Turn the ignition off and wait 10 to 20 minutes. If it fires up, good. But go another 8 miles and it will probably shut down on you again, good now you know for curtain the sensor is going bad.
      >
      > Hope this helps,
      > Greg Andrews
      > '96 900 BRG
      > 93,000 smiles
      >
      >
      > "samthesidecar" wrote:
      > Back again! 900 Trophy appears to be getting too warm... engine missfires worse than normal & sometimes stops running. Worryingly, the oil pressure light glows at tickover.
      > Propose removing the thermostat, cleaning the cooling system with a two part propriety cleaner & clean the carbs, then see what happens.
      > Anyone got any thoughts.
      > Thanks,
      > Sam.
      >
    • samthesidecar
      Cheers John, I m not going to sweat about the oil light, get the blooming thing running right first! Sam.
      Message 37 of 37 , Jul 20, 2013
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        Cheers John, I'm not going to sweat about the oil light, get the blooming thing running right first!
        Sam.

        --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "johnm12433" <johmurr@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > > The only time I had the oil pressure light come on at idle was last >summer riding into London in really heavy stop-start traffic (I had >only had the bike for a couple of months) when,
        >
        > Hi Sam
        >
        > By your description of the symptoms I would definitely suspect the ignition pickup and/or coils for the engine cutting out.
        >
        > As for the oil light, there have been more than a few VERY relieved owners who found the Oil pressure switch (at the back of the sump) was actually faulty and acting exactly like the engine losing oil pressure when hot. Me included!!! It is a common failure.
        >
        > The switch is cheap and well worth replacing before diving deeper into why the oil light comes on.
        >
        > JohnM
        >
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