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Re: Water in oil

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  • gordon2xbbb
    Yep, It s short journeys at cool or colder temps that does it - you could try running the engine with the hotter plugs than you do at present (so if you re
    Message 1 of 10 , Feb 21, 2013
      Yep,

      It's short journeys at cool or colder temps that does it - you could try running the engine with the 'hotter' plugs than you do at present (so if you're using '9's you could go to '8's - I THINK) but there is no substitute for a good long run to avoid the condensation problem.

      Once it's in there it takes a while to get rid so best to FLUSH the engine, cure whatever is leaking (if any) and start afresh with renewed determination to ride it further and more often...

      I love the bit about Doctors Orders if SWMBO asks - I use that excuse ALL the time !

      Cheers
      Gordon
      2xBBB
      Stroud, Gloucestershire, UK

      --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "johnm12433" <johmurr@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > > Anyone else seen this? It seems as tough the very cold temps have something to do with it.
      > >
      > Hi Jack
      >
      Simple fix? Take it for a loooong run (120 Miles at least) without a stop. The oil gets hot and evaporates the moisture. Repeat this every week. Doctors orders if she who must be obeyed asks ;^)
      >
      > It was a very common thing on older cars in cold climates.
      >
      > Regards
      > John M
      >
    • JackM
      Hey Guys, Really appreciate the well-reasoned responses. The short-trip-in-cold-weather explanation seems the most likely at this point. 95% of my riding is
      Message 2 of 10 , Feb 21, 2013
        Hey Guys,
        Really appreciate the well-reasoned responses. The short-trip-in-cold-weather explanation seems the most likely at this point. 95% of my riding is daily commuting, 27 miles each way, 9 hours between rides. And even my few weekend rides are seldom very long, maybe just 40-50 miles of putting around the Sierras.

        And like I said, it did this same thing last winter. So maybe I'll wait until at least April before I start turning wrenches. Really am hoping it's nothing serious because I am planning a 6000 mile round trip ride this summer to my home town in Michigan.

        Hoping the schedule allows to drop in to see Mr Greg and Frankenstein. :)

        Later dudes.

        Jack
        Placerville, CA
        (Hangtown USA)
      • Greg
        Hi Jack, I was hoping you would come this way. It would be good to see you again. Have you established a time line yet? I was on the phone with my brother
        Message 3 of 10 , Feb 21, 2013
          Hi Jack,
          I was hoping you would come this way. It would be good to see you again. Have you established a time line yet? I was on the phone with my brother today. We talked about the slime on the dip stick.
          He said oh oh, even his Super 3 didn't show that. But then his was loosing antifreeze and I don't recall you saying that antifreeze is disappearing. How is the thermostat? Too bad our bikes don't have a temperature gauge.

          I finally came across a down side to the aluminum petcock knob. According to my brother if something gets stuck just twist it harder, I also tell him he over torques everything. Well the tapered barrel in the petcock got stuck and of course he... well you know. The two little tabs on the back side of the barrel got twisted off. I can fix it, but it ain't easy. I did the fix for Ed Johnson's bike. Have you even seen a little bitty tap, size 1-72? Man it's small. Sprint Manufacturing can sell petcock kits but not the tapered aluminum barrel.
          Good to hear from you,
          Greg

          jackon2wheelz wrote:
          Hey Guys, 95% of my riding is daily commuting, 27 miles each way, 9 hours between rides. And even my few weekend rides are seldom very long, maybe just 40-50 miles of putting around the Sierras.
          I am planning a 6000 mile round trip ride this summer to my home town in Michigan.
          Hoping the schedule allows to drop in to see Mr Greg and Frankenstein. :)
          Jack
        • Jack Byers
          Hey Jack, Good to see your name. I was recently thinking we hadn t heard from you since you told us about the Shinko Raven Tires. I bought a set from
          Message 4 of 10 , Feb 21, 2013
            Hey Jack,
              Good to see your name. I was recently thinking we hadn't heard from you since you told us about the Shinko "Raven" Tires. I bought a set from Chaparral for less than $200. I haven't put on the rear yet, as I  haven't been in the mood, and I still have some center tread to use up locally. Hey I figured out that I can send pictures from my T-Mobile phone. If someone with a I-phone or ? could receive my pic, and send it to the "photos, I'd send a nail flap photo. I have the fresh leather make one up. I feel silly because it's just a thick leather rectangle with four or five holes punched along one edge. Zip ties are slipped thru the holes, and the they are wrapped around the straight cross-bar on the centerstand, so the flap just drags the ground ahead of the rear tire. Nobody made me so much as a diagram. Greg Andrews saw it, and he wasn't wowed, but I learned of the flap from a Biker that was in England for a few years, and he told me of the "Nail-flap", and how the Guys over there used them. That was at the end of a particularly long stretch of several rear flats from nails and screws. I was getting desperate, so I put one together in about five minutes, using very thick saddle leather scraps. I put one on in May of 1989, and kept one on religiously since. Because, I've not had one flat since. That's 24 years! My lifelong riding buddy, and closest friend says it drives him crazy riding behind me, because he forgets about it, then is startled to see something under my bike. Well Jack I sure hope all is well up your way. Spring is nearly upon us!
             Kindest regards,
               Poppa Jack
            On Feb 21, 2013, at 1:26 PM, JackM wrote:

             


            Hey Guys,
            Really appreciate the well-reasoned responses. The short-trip-in-cold-weather explanation seems the most likely at this point. 95% of my riding is daily commuting, 27 miles each way, 9 hours between rides. And even my few weekend rides are seldom very long, maybe just 40-50 miles of putting around the Sierras.

            And like I said, it did this same thing last winter. So maybe I'll wait until at least April before I start turning wrenches. Really am hoping it's nothing serious because I am planning a 6000 mile round trip ride this summer to my home town in Michigan.

            Hoping the schedule allows to drop in to see Mr Greg and Frankenstein. :)

            Later dudes.

            Jack
            Placerville, CA
            (Hangtown USA)


          • Greg
            Hi All, I want to make a correction. That sentence reads as if I got some kind of delight in finding a fault to it. No, that was not my intent. The knob is
            Message 5 of 10 , Feb 22, 2013
              Hi All, I want to make a correction. That sentence reads as if I got some kind of delight in finding a fault to it. No, that was not my intent.

              The knob is perfect, I bought 4 of them. 2 for my bikes and 2 for my brother's. They are so good that I have 3 or 4 stock plastic knobs I'm am willing to give away. I'll never need them again.

              As with all good designs operator error can still play a part. Maybe that's why Triumph made such a fragile knob. They knew occasionally the plastic internal barrel gets stuck and tapered aluminum barrel that turns it also has these fragile aluminum tabs that can get broken off. So what is easier to repair, the barrel or the knob?
              So when the barrel gets stuck, be gentle, or don't turn the knob.
              Greg Andrews

              gandrews@ wrote:
              I finally came across a down side to the aluminum petcock knob.
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