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So your bike gives you trouble starting sometimes

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  • Don
    OK I fought this occasional starting problem for a while and I finally think I have it licked, with photos to prove it. The story goes like this, I left the
    Message 1 of 13 , Jun 25, 2012
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      OK I fought this occasional starting problem for a while and I finally think I have it licked, with photos to prove it. The story goes like this, I left the house Saturday morning to ride the trophy to an Aikido seminar and she would not start. It turned over fine and was getting gas but acted like it had no spark. I did not have much time to think about it during the day, but during a lunch break I had sometime to think. The bike would only turn over when the clutch was pulled in even in Neutral. So I thought maybe it does not know its in neutral. So I came home shifted it into 1st then neutral and it started right up. But the same thing happened today no start unless I let out the clutch then it would cough. So under the clutch is this little switch with three positions it moves when the clutch lever moves. So I took the switch apart. Very easy, remove the two allen bolts holding the lever clamp on then flip the lever on its side disconnect the wire,l remove the small screw that holds the switch on, and then the switch can be disassembled with three plastic clips. The contacts were corroded and dirty, I cleaned them with sandpaper and she started like a Boss. The whole process took only a few minutes. I will post photos in the files section under clutch switch. If you have the intermittent starting issue try this you just may fine that it fixes it.
    • Phil Golden
      Very good info. Thanks for putting this out there. I m a sponge right now trying to learn all I can! Phil Sent from my iPhone ... [Non-text portions of this
      Message 2 of 13 , Jun 25, 2012
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        Very good info. Thanks for putting this out there. I'm a sponge right now trying to learn all I can!

        Phil

        Sent from my iPhone

        On Jun 25, 2012, at 9:45 PM, "Don" <donnordin@...> wrote:

        > OK I fought this occasional starting problem for a while and I finally think I have it licked, with photos to prove it. The story goes like this, I left the house Saturday morning to ride the trophy to an Aikido seminar and she would not start. It turned over fine and was getting gas but acted like it had no spark. I did not have much time to think about it during the day, but during a lunch break I had sometime to think. The bike would only turn over when the clutch was pulled in even in Neutral. So I thought maybe it does not know its in neutral. So I came home shifted it into 1st then neutral and it started right up. But the same thing happened today no start unless I let out the clutch then it would cough. So under the clutch is this little switch with three positions it moves when the clutch lever moves. So I took the switch apart. Very easy, remove the two allen bolts holding the lever clamp on then flip the lever on its side disconnect the wire,l remove the small screw that holds the switch on, and then the switch can be disassembled with three plastic clips. The contacts were corroded and dirty, I cleaned them with sandpaper and she started like a Boss. The whole process took only a few minutes. I will post photos in the files section under clutch switch. If you have the intermittent starting issue try this you just may fine that it fixes it.
        >
        >


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Don
        Where are you in Texas Phil?.
        Message 3 of 13 , Jun 26, 2012
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          Where are you in Texas Phil?.

          --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, Phil Golden <philgolden@...> wrote:
          >
          > Very good info. Thanks for putting this out there. I'm a sponge right now trying to learn all I can!
          >
          > Phil
          >
          > Sent from my iPhone
          >
          > On Jun 25, 2012, at 9:45 PM, "Don" <donnordin@...> wrote:
          >
          > > OK I fought this occasional starting problem for a while and I finally think I have it licked, with photos to prove it. The story goes like this, I left the house Saturday morning to ride the trophy to an Aikido seminar and she would not start. It turned over fine and was getting gas but acted like it had no spark. I did not have much time to think about it during the day, but during a lunch break I had sometime to think. The bike would only turn over when the clutch was pulled in even in Neutral. So I thought maybe it does not know its in neutral. So I came home shifted it into 1st then neutral and it started right up. But the same thing happened today no start unless I let out the clutch then it would cough. So under the clutch is this little switch with three positions it moves when the clutch lever moves. So I took the switch apart. Very easy, remove the two allen bolts holding the lever clamp on then flip the lever on its side disconnect the wire,l remove the small screw that holds the switch on, and then the switch can be disassembled with three plastic clips. The contacts were corroded and dirty, I cleaned them with sandpaper and she started like a Boss. The whole process took only a few minutes. I will post photos in the files section under clutch switch. If you have the intermittent starting issue try this you just may fine that it fixes it.
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
        • Ed Johnson
          Don, Phil, and all other Sponges out there might be interested to know that there are three more similar things in the list of Doh things to check when you
          Message 4 of 13 , Jun 26, 2012
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            Don, Phil, and all other "Sponges" out there might be interested to know
            that there are three more similar things in the list of "Doh" things to
            check when you run into a hard starting problem. They are the neutral
            switch, the side stand switch and, the kill switch. I can only assume
            that the theory behind all of these things is that if we are stupid
            enough to ride motorcycles to start with we are probably stupid enough
            to make stupid mistakes. Thanks to Tony I now know that all of these
            things combine into an "interlock system" to lift the ground connection
            from the ignitor rendering it useless unless all of the above
            restrictions are in the correct positions. The latest "FIND" in the
            regard of these items [before Don discovered his clutch switch] was the
            kill switch. I have fought hard starting problems ever since I brought
            her home and have done many things to cure this problem but on rare
            occasions it would again rare it's ugly head for no apparent reason. I
            recently learned that because I rarely USE the kill switch it might not
            be the best path to ground that it could be so I squirted some contact
            cleaner into the switch past the button [I hope the stuff got where it
            was supposed to go] and then switched the switch off and on 100 times
            while the engine was shut off. I now have a Trophy that fires up easily
            every time and I think it even looks at me quizzically as if to ask;
            "Why are you surprised, Dumb Shit?" [They have eyes in the gauges that
            watch you ya know! (;-)]
            That's not to say that there aren't other things that can cause
            these beasts to not start easily. I know because I have experienced them
            all! Water in the gas, which is more prevalent in the states because of
            ethanol. Cleaning the tank and draining the float bowls is a must if
            have recently acquired your bike and are not sure where the fuel supply
            has been. [ Mine happened to have been sitting outside in a motorcycle
            shop for sale lot during rainy season in Florida. ] Bad coils. {Some
            Gills have been known to fail. All are suspect!] Plug wires. [ Mine were
            broken inside so the spark had to first jump across the brake in the
            inner conductor before reaching the plug so it could jump again.] Bad
            battery! Mine was relatively new but it was relatively easy during it's
            hard starting days to grind it down to the point where it would spin the
            engine but not fire the ignition. A common problem that can be corrected
            with a larger battery but better corrected by getting everything else in
            the proper condition. [I think mine would now start with a flashlight
            battery!] Spark plugs. My owners manual and the Haynes manual specify
            NGK DPR9EA-9 spark plugs while the factory repair manual specifies NGK
            DPR8EA-9 spark plugs which are one stage hotter. [The lower the number
            in NGK plugs the hotter the plug.] I read somewhere that if you are
            doing short runs and lower speeds the hotter plug might be the better
            choice for you. If you are doing a lot of higher speed riding then the
            cooler plug might be the best choice. I've chosen the hotter plug as I
            do mostly short hops and have found them so far very satisfactory.
            Having said that I also have to admit that I haven't pulled them out to
            look at them since installing them but the 9's were always black and
            sooty. I have over 90,000 miles on my bike and the possibility exists
            that the emulsion tubes have enlarged over time and replacement might be
            in order. I also think that dropping the needles one notch might
            compensate a little for that but I have not tried it yet. Someone else
            has and they did improve their mileage but I'm getting off the topic of
            hard starting although it doesn't take a genius to figure out that it
            would be harder to start a bike with sooty plugs that it would a bike in
            proper tune. Finally there is the synching of the carbs and the setting
            of the fuel/air jets. That seemed to do wonders for my bike regarding
            low speed acceleration and general running not to mention easier
            starting although I did have the valves adjusted at the same time which
            also may have a positive effect.
            That about covers everything I can think of at this writing. My Dad
            taught me that a gasoline engine was just a simple pump. All it had to
            do was Suck, Bang, and Blow! All you need to add to that is fuel to be
            sucked in and spark to make it go bang. Providing you had valves to
            control the sucking and timing to make it spark precisely at the correct
            time to create the bang you have a pretty simple device capable of
            generating a little or a lot of power. His fleet of logging trucks, when
            they all fired up early in the morning, with their large stacks pretty
            much said it all when I was a kid. Hope all of this is helpful to
            someone and you enjoy reading it as much as I enjoyed writing it.
            Ed J.


            On 6/25/2012 10:57 PM, Phil Golden wrote:
            > Very good info. Thanks for putting this out there. I'm a sponge right now trying to learn all I can!
            >
            > Phil
            >
            > Sent from my iPhone
            >
            >
          • gordon4046
            Hi Ed, Being a 4 stroke it has to be SUCK, SQUEEZE, BANG, BLOW ! That s what I used to teach the Air Cadets at School anyway. The rest of your eloquent post
            Message 5 of 13 , Jun 26, 2012
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              Hi Ed,

              Being a 4 stroke it has to be SUCK, SQUEEZE, BANG, BLOW ! That's what I used to teach the Air Cadets at School anyway.

              The rest of your eloquent post was 'spot on' and a great read !

              cheers

              Gordon
              2xBBB's
              Stroud, Gloucestershire, UK

              --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, Ed Johnson <edljohnson2@...> wrote:

              a gasoline engine was just a simple pump.
              All it had to do was Suck, Bang, and Blow!
            • Phil Golden
              Thanks for the info... When I first read Don s post, I was expecting it to be the sidestand switch as I have had to fix that issue before on a different bike
              Message 6 of 13 , Jun 26, 2012
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                Thanks for the info... When I first read Don's post, I was expecting it to
                be the sidestand switch as I have had to fix that issue before on a
                different bike but the clutch switch is a new one for me.

                According to the seller, my bike was recently 'gone through' by a
                motorsports shop and is in excellent running condition. He is a retired
                motorcop so I believe him when he says he knows how a bike should run.
                However, he is providing receipts for everything so I will get a better
                idea of what all was done when I get there.

                I hate to throw money at it if she is running good, but I have some Nology
                coils and 'Busa calipers on bookmark as well as the other FAQs.

                By the way, I went to Iridium plugs in my BMW (F650 Dakar) and she
                immediately ran much better and all of the 4k hesitation I was feeling
                (feels like a sloppy chain or slipping clutch) disappeared. Is there an
                equivalent plug folks run on the Trophys that might improve starting?? I
                also changed over to the NGK arresters - so it could have been the
                combo.....

                Thanks again!!
                Phil



                On Tue, Jun 26, 2012 at 1:53 PM, gordon4046
                <gordon.smith29@...>wrote:

                > **
                >
                >
                > Hi Ed,
                >
                > Being a 4 stroke it has to be SUCK, SQUEEZE, BANG, BLOW ! That's what I
                > used to teach the Air Cadets at School anyway.
                >
                > The rest of your eloquent post was 'spot on' and a great read !
                >
                > cheers
                >
                > Gordon
                > 2xBBB's
                > Stroud, Gloucestershire, UK
                >
                >
                > --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, Ed Johnson <edljohnson2@...> wrote:
                >
                > a gasoline engine was just a simple pump.
                > All it had to do was Suck, Bang, and Blow!
                >
                >
                >



                --
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                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • a2 - inoperative emessages
                That was so well balanced and written that 1) Gordon you took the words out of my mouth and 2) I believed Ed that your engine didn t squeeze... A2
                Message 7 of 13 , Jun 26, 2012
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                  That was so well balanced and written that 1) Gordon you took the words out of my mouth and 2) I believed Ed that your engine didn't squeeze...

                  A2

                  --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "gordon4046" <gordon.smith29@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hi Ed,
                  >
                  > Being a 4 stroke it has to be SUCK, SQUEEZE, BANG, BLOW ! That's what I used to teach the Air Cadets at School anyway.
                  >
                  > The rest of your eloquent post was 'spot on' and a great read !
                  >
                  > cheers
                  >
                  > Gordon
                  > 2xBBB's
                  > Stroud, Gloucestershire, UK
                  >
                  > --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, Ed Johnson <edljohnson2@> wrote:
                  >
                  > a gasoline engine was just a simple pump.
                  > All it had to do was Suck, Bang, and Blow!
                  >
                • a2 - inoperative emessages
                  I have had iridiums for approx 3000 miles unfortunately I have not pulled them out recently to check their colour and I can t say they solved a problem,
                  Message 8 of 13 , Jun 26, 2012
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                    I have had iridiums for approx 3000 miles unfortunately I have not pulled them out recently to check their colour and I can't say they solved a problem, although I had multiple problems which included plugs. The plugs however and the battery were likely victims of a rich setup, poor electrical contacts, water and rust in the fuel and more (but these probably were the most influential). I have since dropped the needles. The iridiums were more a treat to acknowledge that I had come out of the loop of faults and that I was prepared to risk some expensive toys as in the meantime I had probably swapped plugs twice in less than 100 miles during the problems.

                    Ed's recent post reflects a similar cycle of fault finding. (and more clearly written) I also have to admit my part in not understanding the narrow window of the starting technique required which still seems slightly to resemble a mystical process whose exact principles I break at my own risk. Eg i don't just crank the starter but spin it up and release the starter (before it has caught) as it will start seemingly once I have relinquished the cranking power from the starter to the ignitor. ( I hope that is readable and indicates not the easiest of starting but with rising confidence)

                    Ken has indicated that he does not have starting issues (within normal service limits) therefore I was partly interested in the summer meet to listen to his starting technique on his bike which I believe he owned from new in contrast to the neglect from mine's POs and my bodging....

                    I did the busa brake upgrade and conclude that the impossibility of getting all of the air out of the previous setup (splitter at the yoke) was more influential and had I changed the hydraulic line layout first I would not have felt the urge to explore the busas. (to anyone with the splitter at yoke level (with firm brakes) NEVER let air in the first instance.....)

                    NB if I told my insurance company that I had upgraded the brakes I would pay more and with some, be uninsurable. (doh unless I attached the rest of the busa - should have thought of that for cheaper insurance (sarc))

                    A2






                    --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, Phil Golden <philgolden@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Thanks for the info... When I first read Don's post, I was expecting it to
                    > be the sidestand switch as I have had to fix that issue before on a
                    > different bike but the clutch switch is a new one for me.
                    >
                    > According to the seller, my bike was recently 'gone through' by a
                    > motorsports shop and is in excellent running condition. He is a retired
                    > motorcop so I believe him when he says he knows how a bike should run.
                    > However, he is providing receipts for everything so I will get a better
                    > idea of what all was done when I get there.
                    >
                    > I hate to throw money at it if she is running good, but I have some Nology
                    > coils and 'Busa calipers on bookmark as well as the other FAQs.
                    >
                    > By the way, I went to Iridium plugs in my BMW (F650 Dakar) and she
                    > immediately ran much better and all of the 4k hesitation I was feeling
                    > (feels like a sloppy chain or slipping clutch) disappeared. Is there an
                  • Don
                    Ed where is the neutral switch? I may as well complete the process and check it
                    Message 9 of 13 , Jun 27, 2012
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                      Ed where is the neutral switch? I may as well complete the process and check it

                      --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, Ed Johnson <edljohnson2@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Don, Phil, and all other "Sponges" out there might be interested to know
                      > that there are three more similar things in the list of "Doh" things to
                      > check when you run into a hard starting problem. They are the neutral
                      > switch, the side stand switch and, the kill switch. I can only assume
                      > that the theory behind all of these things is that if we are stupid
                      > enough to ride motorcycles to start with we are probably stupid enough
                      > to make stupid mistakes. Thanks to Tony I now know that all of these
                      > things combine into an "interlock system" to lift the ground connection
                      > from the ignitor rendering it useless unless all of the above
                      > restrictions are in the correct positions. The latest "FIND" in the
                      > regard of these items [before Don discovered his clutch switch] was the
                      > kill switch. I have fought hard starting problems ever since I brought
                      > her home and have done many things to cure this problem but on rare
                      > occasions it would again rare it's ugly head for no apparent reason. I
                      > recently learned that because I rarely USE the kill switch it might not
                      > be the best path to ground that it could be so I squirted some contact
                      > cleaner into the switch past the button [I hope the stuff got where it
                      > was supposed to go] and then switched the switch off and on 100 times
                      > while the engine was shut off. I now have a Trophy that fires up easily
                      > every time and I think it even looks at me quizzically as if to ask;
                      > "Why are you surprised, Dumb Shit?" [They have eyes in the gauges that
                      > watch you ya know! (;-)]
                      > That's not to say that there aren't other things that can cause
                      > these beasts to not start easily. I know because I have experienced them
                      > all! Water in the gas, which is more prevalent in the states because of
                      > ethanol. Cleaning the tank and draining the float bowls is a must if
                      > have recently acquired your bike and are not sure where the fuel supply
                      > has been. [ Mine happened to have been sitting outside in a motorcycle
                      > shop for sale lot during rainy season in Florida. ] Bad coils. {Some
                      > Gills have been known to fail. All are suspect!] Plug wires. [ Mine were
                      > broken inside so the spark had to first jump across the brake in the
                      > inner conductor before reaching the plug so it could jump again.] Bad
                      > battery! Mine was relatively new but it was relatively easy during it's
                      > hard starting days to grind it down to the point where it would spin the
                      > engine but not fire the ignition. A common problem that can be corrected
                      > with a larger battery but better corrected by getting everything else in
                      > the proper condition. [I think mine would now start with a flashlight
                      > battery!] Spark plugs. My owners manual and the Haynes manual specify
                      > NGK DPR9EA-9 spark plugs while the factory repair manual specifies NGK
                      > DPR8EA-9 spark plugs which are one stage hotter. [The lower the number
                      > in NGK plugs the hotter the plug.] I read somewhere that if you are
                      > doing short runs and lower speeds the hotter plug might be the better
                      > choice for you. If you are doing a lot of higher speed riding then the
                      > cooler plug might be the best choice. I've chosen the hotter plug as I
                      > do mostly short hops and have found them so far very satisfactory.
                      > Having said that I also have to admit that I haven't pulled them out to
                      > look at them since installing them but the 9's were always black and
                      > sooty. I have over 90,000 miles on my bike and the possibility exists
                      > that the emulsion tubes have enlarged over time and replacement might be
                      > in order. I also think that dropping the needles one notch might
                      > compensate a little for that but I have not tried it yet. Someone else
                      > has and they did improve their mileage but I'm getting off the topic of
                      > hard starting although it doesn't take a genius to figure out that it
                      > would be harder to start a bike with sooty plugs that it would a bike in
                      > proper tune. Finally there is the synching of the carbs and the setting
                      > of the fuel/air jets. That seemed to do wonders for my bike regarding
                      > low speed acceleration and general running not to mention easier
                      > starting although I did have the valves adjusted at the same time which
                      > also may have a positive effect.
                      > That about covers everything I can think of at this writing. My Dad
                      > taught me that a gasoline engine was just a simple pump. All it had to
                      > do was Suck, Bang, and Blow! All you need to add to that is fuel to be
                      > sucked in and spark to make it go bang. Providing you had valves to
                      > control the sucking and timing to make it spark precisely at the correct
                      > time to create the bang you have a pretty simple device capable of
                      > generating a little or a lot of power. His fleet of logging trucks, when
                      > they all fired up early in the morning, with their large stacks pretty
                      > much said it all when I was a kid. Hope all of this is helpful to
                      > someone and you enjoy reading it as much as I enjoyed writing it.
                      > Ed J.
                      >
                      >
                      > On 6/25/2012 10:57 PM, Phil Golden wrote:
                      > > Very good info. Thanks for putting this out there. I'm a sponge right now trying to learn all I can!
                      > >
                      > > Phil
                      > >
                      > > Sent from my iPhone
                      > >
                      > >
                      >
                    • Ed Johnson
                      Don; You re going to need a Haynes Manual #2162 if you don t already have one. You ll find the neutral switch on page 9-15. If you don t have one yet the
                      Message 10 of 13 , Jun 27, 2012
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                        Don; You're going to need a Haynes Manual #2162 if you don't already
                        have one. You'll find the neutral switch on page 9-15. If you don't have
                        one yet the switch is screwed into the crankcase between the water pump
                        and the sprocket cover according to the manual. [I haven't checked
                        mine.] What I left out of my long dissertation is that there has to be
                        another ground interrupter somewhere in the starting circuit because my
                        starter will not engage unless the clutch is pulled in. Yet after she
                        starts I can release the clutch and she still runs. Tony?
                        Ed J.

                        On 6/27/2012 7:01 AM, Don wrote:
                        > Ed where is the neutral switch? I may as well complete the process and check it
                        >
                        >
                      • Ed Johnson
                        Thanks Gordon! You are absolutely correct! Without the squeeze there can t be any blow ! [The stateside slang experts could have a field day with that
                        Message 11 of 13 , Jun 27, 2012
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                          Thanks Gordon! You are absolutely correct! Without the "squeeze" there
                          can't be any "blow"! [The stateside slang experts could have a field day
                          with that comment but I'm not going to touch it with a 10 foot Pole. Not
                          even a 10 foot German! (;-)]
                          Ed J.

                          On 6/26/2012 1:53 PM, gordon4046 wrote:
                          > Hi Ed,
                          >
                          > Being a 4 stroke it has to be SUCK, SQUEEZE, BANG, BLOW ! That's what I used to teach the Air Cadets at School anyway.
                          >
                          > The rest of your eloquent post was 'spot on' and a great read !
                          >
                          > cheers
                          >
                          > Gordon
                          > 2xBBB's
                          > Stroud, Gloucestershire, UK
                          >
                          >
                        • Don
                          Ed my bike did the same thing until I cleaned that switch, previously had to pull The clutch in to get it to turn over. As for manuals I have the triumph
                          Message 12 of 13 , Jun 27, 2012
                          • 0 Attachment
                            Ed my bike did the same thing until I cleaned that switch, previously had to pull
                            The clutch in to get it to turn over.
                            As for manuals I have the triumph manual, but maybe the Hayes is better. I will check it out.

                            --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, Ed Johnson <edljohnson2@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > Don; You're going to need a Haynes Manual #2162 if you don't already
                            > have one. You'll find the neutral switch on page 9-15. If you don't have
                            > one yet the switch is screwed into the crankcase between the water pump
                            > and the sprocket cover according to the manual. [I haven't checked
                            > mine.] What I left out of my long dissertation is that there has to be
                            > another ground interrupter somewhere in the starting circuit because my
                            > starter will not engage unless the clutch is pulled in. Yet after she
                            > starts I can release the clutch and she still runs. Tony?
                            > Ed J.
                            >
                            > On 6/27/2012 7:01 AM, Don wrote:
                            > > Ed where is the neutral switch? I may as well complete the process and check it
                            > >
                            > >
                            >
                          • TJ
                            Sorry, I missed this message Don. I am in Wichita Falls, TX. North and far away from like every place in Texas it seems. :)
                            Message 13 of 13 , Jun 29, 2012
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                              Sorry, I missed this message Don.

                              I am in Wichita Falls, TX. North and far away from like every place in Texas it seems. :)



                              --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "Don" <donnordin@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Where are you in Texas Phil?.
                              >
                              > --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, Phil Golden <philgolden@> wrote:
                              > >
                              > > Very good info. Thanks for putting this out there. I'm a sponge right now trying to learn all I can!
                              > >
                              > > Phil
                              > >
                              > > Sent from my iPhone
                              > >
                              > > On Jun 25, 2012, at 9:45 PM, "Don" <donnordin@> wrote:
                              > >
                              > > > OK I fought this occasional starting problem for a while and I finally think I have it licked, with photos to prove it. The story goes like this, I left the house Saturday morning to ride the trophy to an Aikido seminar and she would not start. It turned over fine and was getting gas but acted like it had no spark. I did not have much time to think about it during the day, but during a lunch break I had sometime to think. The bike would only turn over when the clutch was pulled in even in Neutral. So I thought maybe it does not know its in neutral. So I came home shifted it into 1st then neutral and it started right up. But the same thing happened today no start unless I let out the clutch then it would cough. So under the clutch is this little switch with three positions it moves when the clutch lever moves. So I took the switch apart. Very easy, remove the two allen bolts holding the lever clamp on then flip the lever on its side disconnect the wire,l remove the small screw that holds the switch on, and then the switch can be disassembled with three plastic clips. The contacts were corroded and dirty, I cleaned them with sandpaper and she started like a Boss. The whole process took only a few minutes. I will post photos in the files section under clutch switch. If you have the intermittent starting issue try this you just may fine that it fixes it.
                              > > >
                              > > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              > >
                              >
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