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Re: What's the easy way to compress front brake cylinders?

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  • lovemytrophy
    I ll add to my last statement, by saying that with the bleed nipple loosened and the caliper removed from the bike, it is very easy to push the pistons back
    Message 1 of 25 , May 2, 2012
      I'll add to my last statement, by saying that with the bleed nipple loosened and the caliper removed from the bike, it is very easy to push the pistons back into the bores individually, which you are not going to be able to do with it connected to the fluid reservoir.

      Tony


      --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "lovemytrophy" <tony.mitchell51@...> wrote:
      >
      > Loosen the bleed nipple to release the pressure, then spray the whole of the inside of the caliper, including what is protruding of the pistons with WD40. Leave it to stand for a few hours or preferably overnight. Give it another spray with WD40 and get a tooth brush in there to clean out all the crap.
      > When it's all nice and clean and you can see the state of the pistons, look around the edges of the pistons for evidence of damaged seals. If they are damaged they will usually show up as whisps of black rubber sticking out between piston and caliper. If that's the case, you need to pop the pistons right out and replace the seals.
      > If you do that, give the pistons a really good clean before you put them back. You can use 1200 grit wet or dry paper to clean the pistons of any light surface rust etc. without any risk of damage, so long as you are careful.
      > While you have the pistons out, use the toothbrush to clean inside the bore, especially the grooves where the fluid and dust seals fit.
      > If fitting new seals, use a good quality rubber grease on the seals to slide them into their respective grooves. You can also use the same grease very lightly on the pistons to ease them back in. Finger and thumb pressure is all that should be needed.
      > If your seals don't show signs of damage and you just want to push the pistons back, after a thorough cleaning, put some brake fluid around the exposed area of the pistons and whilst wearing protective latex gloves, use fingers and thumbs to push them squarely back into the bores until they are flush with the caliper bore opening. Close up the bleed nipple, top up the fluid and bleed it through and make sure that you pump the pistons out until the pads just touch the discs. If you cleaned it and got it all right, when you release the brake lever, you should notice that the pistons will move back very slightly. If they don't, then the brakes will bind, so you'll have to take them apart again and find out why they aren't operating correctly. Usually, because some or all of the moving parts are not 100% clean.
      > This last winter, I totally stripped down and rebuilt my own rear caliper and they collect a whole load more crud than the front ones, but it now operates like new.
      >
      > Tony
      > Chelmsford, UK
      >
      > --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "cdm" <cdmoyer@> wrote:
      > >
      > > There's only about a 1/4" gap between the pistons and the disc. How do you fit a clamp in there? I tried placing a screwdriver blade across one and clamping against that but it didn't work. Thx.
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "Ken Hastie" <ken@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > I used a C clamp
      > > >
      > > > The pistons have to be relatively clean to be withdrawn back into the
      > > > caliper without damaging seals
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > Ken Hastie
      > > > Triumph Trophy 1200, BSA A75 Rocket Three, A10 Golden Flash, B40 350cc, D10
      > > > and D14 Bantams
      > > >  
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > > -----Original Message-----
      > > > > The old pads came out easily enough but I can't compress the cylinders
      > > > > to slip the new ones in. Haynes says push them in using hand pressure
      > > > > only. Ha! I can't position a c-clamp in there to do it. Do I need to
      > > > > disassemble the calipers? Thx.
      > > >
      > >
      >
    • a2 - inoperative emessages
      I think I use tyre irons or whatever similar soft edged lever but have you lubricated the seals with brake fluid and have you releases the pressure from the
      Message 2 of 25 , May 2, 2012
        I think I use tyre irons or whatever similar soft edged lever but have you lubricated the seals with brake fluid and have you releases the pressure from the fluid. Mounting them to the bike might give you better purchase. Likewise to Ken, I expect to be able to spin them about a bit as they first go in to ensure free movement and ensure they went in clean.
        A2


        --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "cdm" <cdmoyer@...> wrote:
        >
        > There's only about a 1/4" gap between the pistons and the disc. How do you fit a clamp in there? I tried placing a screwdriver blade across one and clamping against that but it didn't work. Thx.
        >
        >
        > --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "Ken Hastie" <ken@> wrote:
        > >
        > > I used a C clamp
        > >
        > > The pistons have to be relatively clean to be withdrawn back into the
        > > caliper without damaging seals
        > >
        > >
        > > Ken Hastie
        > > Triumph Trophy 1200, BSA A75 Rocket Three, A10 Golden Flash, B40 350cc, D10
        > > and D14 Bantams
        > >  
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > > -----Original Message-----
        > > > The old pads came out easily enough but I can't compress the cylinders
        > > > to slip the new ones in. Haynes says push them in using hand pressure
        > > > only. Ha! I can't position a c-clamp in there to do it. Do I need to
        > > > disassemble the calipers? Thx.
        > >
        >
      • rick
        ... Tony, Since WD40 is a petroleum product, I would really worry about exposing the brake seal rubber to it. I have always used brake cleaner or brake fluid,
        Message 3 of 25 , May 3, 2012
          --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "lovemytrophy" <tony.mitchell51@...> wrote:
          >
          > Loosen the bleed nipple to release the pressure, then spray the whole of the inside of the caliper, including what is protruding of the pistons with WD40. Leave it to stand for a few hours or preferably overnight. Give it another spray with WD40 and get a tooth brush in there to clean out all the crap.

          Tony,

          Since WD40 is a petroleum product, I would really worry about exposing the brake seal rubber to it. I have always used brake cleaner or brake fluid, but in my experience, contact with any petroleum based product risks swelling the seal rubber. Is there something special about WD40 that allows it to be compatible with brake seals?

          Rick Hartwick
        • lovemytrophy
          Hi Rick, Most cleaners are petroleum based, however, in my case, I already knew that the rubber seals were shot, so it didn t make any difference. However,
          Message 4 of 25 , May 3, 2012
            Hi Rick,
            Most cleaners are petroleum based, however, in my case, I already knew that the rubber seals were shot, so it didn't make any difference. However, WD40 is recommended for spraying onto most things to prevent water penetration, metalwork, electrics etc. A lot of the stuff around the engine is rubber, yet WD40 can be sprayed on it with no problems. (See someone else's post here about spraying it onto the carb to cylinder head rubbers to check for leaks). Whatever you use, it is much easier to pump the pistons right out prior to removing the caliper from the bike. Then remove the caliper, remove the bleed nipple and you have everything separate to be able to clean it properly. In the case of my rear caliper, the fluid seals were shot and strands of rubber were visible between the caliper and the piston. After removing the pistons, I discovered that whoever had worked on the bike prior to my ownership, had failed to put new dust seals in it. It only had the fluid seals and the grooves where the dust seals are supposed to go were full of crud. I had a right old job cleaning that out without causing any damage.
            I bought new seals and pistons kit from a bike accessory dealer, plus I bought a tube of rubber lube for the reassembly.
            After lubing the seals and fitting them, a little more of the lube on the sides of the pistons and they went in beautifully. I could hold each piston between finger and thumb and push them in and pull them out again. Very nice easy movement. Pushed them in until flush with the face of the caliper, then refitted the caliper to the bike. Bled the system and pumped the pistons out until I had braking force. No binding or anything after that. The guy that did the MOT was well impressed, said they were working like new.
            It sounds like a lot of work, but it is so quick and easy. Much easier than trying to clean it all up and push the pistons back in while it's still connected up on the bike.

            Tony
            Chelmsford, UK


            --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "rick" <rhartwick@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "lovemytrophy" <tony.mitchell51@> wrote:
            > >
            > > Loosen the bleed nipple to release the pressure, then spray the whole of the inside of the caliper, including what is protruding of the pistons with WD40. Leave it to stand for a few hours or preferably overnight. Give it another spray with WD40 and get a tooth brush in there to clean out all the crap.
            >
            > Tony,
            >
            > Since WD40 is a petroleum product, I would really worry about exposing the brake seal rubber to it. I have always used brake cleaner or brake fluid, but in my experience, contact with any petroleum based product risks swelling the seal rubber. Is there something special about WD40 that allows it to be compatible with brake seals?
            >
            > Rick Hartwick
            >
          • a2 - inoperative emessages
            That stuff you are spraying - I wouldn t spray it on my electrics......brrrrrrr...... And I can t think of a reason to disperse water that a dry cloth wouldn t
            Message 5 of 25 , May 3, 2012
              That stuff you are spraying - I wouldn't spray it on my electrics......brrrrrrr...... And I can't think of a reason to disperse water that a dry cloth wouldn't do a better job. It's wetting effect is so short term that it's a waste of time compared to doing proper lubrication. It's the last thing you want on your electrics if you want the bike to start - spray it up your ht leads and you can gauge its immediate negative effect.

              Carb cleaner is another dubious one to be cautious of....

              A2


              --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "lovemytrophy" <tony.mitchell51@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hi Rick,
              > Most cleaners are petroleum based, however, in my case, I already knew that the rubber seals were shot, so it didn't make any difference. However, WD40 is recommended for spraying onto most things to prevent water penetration, metalwork, electrics etc. A lot of the stuff around the engine is rubber, yet WD40 can be sprayed on it with no problems. (See someone else's post here about spraying it onto the carb to cylinder head rubbers to check for leaks). Whatever you use, it is much easier to pump the pistons right out prior to removing the caliper from the bike. Then remove the caliper, remove the bleed nipple and you have everything separate to be able to clean it properly. In the case of my rear caliper, the fluid seals were shot and strands of rubber were visible between the caliper and the piston. After removing the pistons, I discovered that whoever had worked on the bike prior to my ownership, had failed to put new dust seals in it. It only had the fluid seals and the grooves where the dust seals are supposed to go were full of crud. I had a right old job cleaning that out without causing any damage.
              > I bought new seals and pistons kit from a bike accessory dealer, plus I bought a tube of rubber lube for the reassembly.
              > After lubing the seals and fitting them, a little more of the lube on the sides of the pistons and they went in beautifully. I could hold each piston between finger and thumb and push them in and pull them out again. Very nice easy movement. Pushed them in until flush with the face of the caliper, then refitted the caliper to the bike. Bled the system and pumped the pistons out until I had braking force. No binding or anything after that. The guy that did the MOT was well impressed, said they were working like new.
              > It sounds like a lot of work, but it is so quick and easy. Much easier than trying to clean it all up and push the pistons back in while it's still connected up on the bike.
              >
              > Tony
              > Chelmsford, UK
              >
              >
              > --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "rick" <rhartwick@> wrote:
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "lovemytrophy" <tony.mitchell51@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > Loosen the bleed nipple to release the pressure, then spray the whole of the inside of the caliper, including what is protruding of the pistons with WD40. Leave it to stand for a few hours or preferably overnight. Give it another spray with WD40 and get a tooth brush in there to clean out all the crap.
              > >
              > > Tony,
              > >
              > > Since WD40 is a petroleum product, I would really worry about exposing the brake seal rubber to it. I have always used brake cleaner or brake fluid, but in my experience, contact with any petroleum based product risks swelling the seal rubber. Is there something special about WD40 that allows it to be compatible with brake seals?
              > >
              > > Rick Hartwick
              > >
              >
            • Jack Byers
              Hi A2, I have used WD-40 on plenty of electrics over the last 40 odd years, without a negative outcome even once! I don t doubt the word of my fellows, but my
              Message 6 of 25 , May 4, 2012
                Hi A2,
                I have used WD-40 on plenty of electrics over the last 40 odd
                years, without a negative outcome even once! I don't doubt the word
                of my fellows, but my experience with it seems so different than what
                I've heard on these pages. I even know guys that swear that WD-40 is
                good for sprained ankles and other pain issues. They say to spray it
                on, and wrap it up good. Relief is on the way! So confusing.
                Kindest regards,
                Poppa Jack
                On May 3, 2012, at 8:33 PM, a2 - inoperative emessages wrote:

                >
                > That stuff you are spraying - I wouldn't spray it on my
                > electrics......brrrrrrr...... And I can't think of a reason to
                > disperse water that a dry cloth wouldn't do a better job. It's
                > wetting effect is so short term that it's a waste of time compared
                > to doing proper lubrication. It's the last thing you want on your
                > electrics if you want the bike to start - spray it up your ht leads
                > and you can gauge its immediate negative effect.
                >
                > Carb cleaner is another dubious one to be cautious of....
                >
                > A2
                >
                > --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "lovemytrophy"
                > <tony.mitchell51@...> wrote:
                > >
                > > Hi Rick,
                > > Most cleaners are petroleum based, however, in my case, I already
                > knew that the rubber seals were shot, so it didn't make any
                > difference. However, WD40 is recommended for spraying onto most
                > things to prevent water penetration, metalwork, electrics etc. A
                > lot of the stuff around the engine is rubber, yet WD40 can be
                > sprayed on it with no problems. (See someone else's post here about
                > spraying it onto the carb to cylinder head rubbers to check for
                > leaks). Whatever you use, it is much easier to pump the pistons
                > right out prior to removing the caliper from the bike. Then remove
                > the caliper, remove the bleed nipple and you have everything
                > separate to be able to clean it properly. In the case of my rear
                > caliper, the fluid seals were shot and strands of rubber were
                > visible between the caliper and the piston. After removing the
                > pistons, I discovered that whoever had worked on the bike prior to
                > my ownership, had failed to put new dust seals in it. It only had
                > the fluid seals and the grooves where the dust seals are supposed
                > to go were full of crud. I had a right old job cleaning that out
                > without causing any damage.
                > > I bought new seals and pistons kit from a bike accessory dealer,
                > plus I bought a tube of rubber lube for the reassembly.
                > > After lubing the seals and fitting them, a little more of the
                > lube on the sides of the pistons and they went in beautifully. I
                > could hold each piston between finger and thumb and push them in
                > and pull them out again. Very nice easy movement. Pushed them in
                > until flush with the face of the caliper, then refitted the caliper
                > to the bike. Bled the system and pumped the pistons out until I had
                > braking force. No binding or anything after that. The guy that did
                > the MOT was well impressed, said they were working like new.
                > > It sounds like a lot of work, but it is so quick and easy. Much
                > easier than trying to clean it all up and push the pistons back in
                > while it's still connected up on the bike.
                > >
                > > Tony
                > > Chelmsford, UK
                > >
                > >
                > > --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "rick" <rhartwick@> wrote:
                > > >
                > > >
                > > >
                > > > --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "lovemytrophy"
                > <tony.mitchell51@> wrote:
                > > > >
                > > > > Loosen the bleed nipple to release the pressure, then spray
                > the whole of the inside of the caliper, including what is
                > protruding of the pistons with WD40. Leave it to stand for a few
                > hours or preferably overnight. Give it another spray with WD40 and
                > get a tooth brush in there to clean out all the crap.
                > > >
                > > > Tony,
                > > >
                > > > Since WD40 is a petroleum product, I would really worry about
                > exposing the brake seal rubber to it. I have always used brake
                > cleaner or brake fluid, but in my experience, contact with any
                > petroleum based product risks swelling the seal rubber. Is there
                > something special about WD40 that allows it to be compatible with
                > brake seals?
                > > >
                > > > Rick Hartwick
                > > >
                > >
                >
                >



                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • a2 - inoperative emessages
                I guess it s wet and comes in a convenient tin with a little hose. It conducts electricity it s a very short term lubricant, it disperses water about as well
                Message 7 of 25 , May 4, 2012
                  I guess it's wet and comes in a convenient tin with a little hose. It conducts electricity it's a very short term lubricant, it disperses water about as well as canned air.
                  It then allows all sorts of shit to stick to ones electrics. It does not solve poor electrical problems long term nor improve insulation breakdown. There are several other spray oils on the market that are better lubricants.
                  I don't completely dislike the stuff I just don't accept all the extra "properties" not on the tin and I hate the generic use of it - reminds me of the 85% domination of the male shaving market by a marketed product that even claims its for a real man that needs fusion!
                  Sprained ankles heal themselves.....
                  Myth busted?

                  Clean electrics mmmmm
                  A2


                  --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, Jack Byers <jackbyers@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Hi A2,
                  > I have used WD-40 on plenty of electrics over the last 40 odd
                  > years, without a negative outcome even once! I don't doubt the word
                  > of my fellows, but my experience with it seems so different than what
                  > I've heard on these pages. I even know guys that swear that WD-40 is
                  > good for sprained ankles and other pain issues. They say to spray it
                  > on, and wrap it up good. Relief is on the way! So confusing.
                  > Kindest regards,
                  > Poppa Jack
                  > On May 3, 2012, at 8:33 PM, a2 - inoperative emessages wrote:
                  >
                  > >
                  > > That stuff you are spraying - I wouldn't spray it on my
                  > > electrics......brrrrrrr...... And I can't think of a reason to
                  > > disperse water that a dry cloth wouldn't do a better job. It's
                  > > wetting effect is so short term that it's a waste of time compared
                  > > to doing proper lubrication. It's the last thing you want on your
                  > > electrics if you want the bike to start - spray it up your ht leads
                  > > and you can gauge its immediate negative effect.
                  > >
                  > > Carb cleaner is another dubious one to be cautious of....
                  > >
                  > > A2
                  > >
                  > > --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "lovemytrophy"
                  > > <tony.mitchell51@> wrote:
                  > > >
                  > > > Hi Rick,
                  > > > Most cleaners are petroleum based, however, in my case, I already
                  > > knew that the rubber seals were shot, so it didn't make any
                  > > difference. However, WD40 is recommended for spraying onto most
                  > > things to prevent water penetration, metalwork, electrics etc. A
                  > > lot of the stuff around the engine is rubber, yet WD40 can be
                  > > sprayed on it with no problems. (See someone else's post here about
                  > > spraying it onto the carb to cylinder head rubbers to check for
                  > > leaks). Whatever you use, it is much easier to pump the pistons
                  > > right out prior to removing the caliper from the bike. Then remove
                  > > the caliper, remove the bleed nipple and you have everything
                  > > separate to be able to clean it properly. In the case of my rear
                  > > caliper, the fluid seals were shot and strands of rubber were
                  > > visible between the caliper and the piston. After removing the
                  > > pistons, I discovered that whoever had worked on the bike prior to
                  > > my ownership, had failed to put new dust seals in it. It only had
                  > > the fluid seals and the grooves where the dust seals are supposed
                  > > to go were full of crud. I had a right old job cleaning that out
                  > > without causing any damage.
                  > > > I bought new seals and pistons kit from a bike accessory dealer,
                  > > plus I bought a tube of rubber lube for the reassembly.
                  > > > After lubing the seals and fitting them, a little more of the
                  > > lube on the sides of the pistons and they went in beautifully. I
                  > > could hold each piston between finger and thumb and push them in
                  > > and pull them out again. Very nice easy movement. Pushed them in
                  > > until flush with the face of the caliper, then refitted the caliper
                  > > to the bike. Bled the system and pumped the pistons out until I had
                  > > braking force. No binding or anything after that. The guy that did
                  > > the MOT was well impressed, said they were working like new.
                  > > > It sounds like a lot of work, but it is so quick and easy. Much
                  > > easier than trying to clean it all up and push the pistons back in
                  > > while it's still connected up on the bike.
                  > > >
                  > > > Tony
                  > > > Chelmsford, UK
                  > > >
                  > > >
                  > > > --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "rick" <rhartwick@> wrote:
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > >
                  > > > > --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "lovemytrophy"
                  > > <tony.mitchell51@> wrote:
                  > > > > >
                  > > > > > Loosen the bleed nipple to release the pressure, then spray
                  > > the whole of the inside of the caliper, including what is
                  > > protruding of the pistons with WD40. Leave it to stand for a few
                  > > hours or preferably overnight. Give it another spray with WD40 and
                  > > get a tooth brush in there to clean out all the crap.
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Tony,
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Since WD40 is a petroleum product, I would really worry about
                  > > exposing the brake seal rubber to it. I have always used brake
                  > > cleaner or brake fluid, but in my experience, contact with any
                  > > petroleum based product risks swelling the seal rubber. Is there
                  > > something special about WD40 that allows it to be compatible with
                  > > brake seals?
                  > > > >
                  > > > > Rick Hartwick
                  > > > >
                  > > >
                  > >
                  > >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                  >
                • Kevin B
                  Remove the calliper. Clean the exposed parts of the piston with brake cleaner. Put the pads back in. Put two screw drivers (opposite each other) or similar
                  Message 8 of 25 , May 4, 2012
                    Remove the calliper.

                    Clean the exposed parts of the piston with brake cleaner.

                    Put the pads back in. Put two screw drivers (opposite each other) or similar levers between the pads and lever the pads apart and that will push the pistons back without risk of damaging them.
                  • Kevin B
                    Remove the calliper. Clean the exposed parts of the piston with brake cleaner. Put the pads back in. Put two screw drivers (opposite each other) or similar
                    Message 9 of 25 , May 4, 2012
                      Remove the calliper.

                      Clean the exposed parts of the piston with brake cleaner.

                      Put the pads back in. Put two screw drivers (opposite each other) or similar levers between the pads and lever the pads apart and that will push the pistons back without risk of damaging them.
                    • lovemytrophy
                      Carb cleaner is a different story altogether, wouldn t use that on anything but stripped down carbs really. Don t know what it would do to plastics, like the
                      Message 10 of 25 , May 4, 2012
                        Carb cleaner is a different story altogether, wouldn't use that on anything but stripped down carbs really. Don't know what it would do to plastics, like the floats, despite the instructions to spray it into the carb intake.
                        WD40 on the other hand belongs to the same group of water dispersants as ACF50 and that is recommended by just every biker I've ever spoken to - for everything. It's a product of the Lear Aircraft Corporation and is used by all of the major aircraft manufacturers for 'fogging' the internals, where all the cabling etc runs to protect against corrosion. If you read any of the major bike mags, it's recommended for spraying the complete bike prior to laying up for winter (those bikers that I call the sunshine kids - who only bring their bikes out when the sun shines and it's 100 dry).
                        Anyway, I digress, the content of my post was that I used it as a cleaner for my brake caliper and as a lubricant for freeing up the seized pistons. Combined with a nice new hard tooth brush, it's brilliant for cleaning around the exposed area of the pistons as well as the caliper assembly in general. It's also great for getting oil and grease off your hands.

                        Tony
                        Chelmsford, UK


                        --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "a2 - inoperative emessages" <adeux60@...> wrote:
                        >
                        >
                        > That stuff you are spraying - I wouldn't spray it on my electrics......brrrrrrr...... And I can't think of a reason to disperse water that a dry cloth wouldn't do a better job. It's wetting effect is so short term that it's a waste of time compared to doing proper lubrication. It's the last thing you want on your electrics if you want the bike to start - spray it up your ht leads and you can gauge its immediate negative effect.
                        >
                        > Carb cleaner is another dubious one to be cautious of....
                        >
                        > A2
                        >
                        >
                        > --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "lovemytrophy" <tony.mitchell51@> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > Hi Rick,
                        > > Most cleaners are petroleum based, however, in my case, I already knew that the rubber seals were shot, so it didn't make any difference. However, WD40 is recommended for spraying onto most things to prevent water penetration, metalwork, electrics etc. A lot of the stuff around the engine is rubber, yet WD40 can be sprayed on it with no problems. (See someone else's post here about spraying it onto the carb to cylinder head rubbers to check for leaks). Whatever you use, it is much easier to pump the pistons right out prior to removing the caliper from the bike. Then remove the caliper, remove the bleed nipple and you have everything separate to be able to clean it properly. In the case of my rear caliper, the fluid seals were shot and strands of rubber were visible between the caliper and the piston. After removing the pistons, I discovered that whoever had worked on the bike prior to my ownership, had failed to put new dust seals in it. It only had the fluid seals and the grooves where the dust seals are supposed to go were full of crud. I had a right old job cleaning that out without causing any damage.
                        > > I bought new seals and pistons kit from a bike accessory dealer, plus I bought a tube of rubber lube for the reassembly.
                        > > After lubing the seals and fitting them, a little more of the lube on the sides of the pistons and they went in beautifully. I could hold each piston between finger and thumb and push them in and pull them out again. Very nice easy movement. Pushed them in until flush with the face of the caliper, then refitted the caliper to the bike. Bled the system and pumped the pistons out until I had braking force. No binding or anything after that. The guy that did the MOT was well impressed, said they were working like new.
                        > > It sounds like a lot of work, but it is so quick and easy. Much easier than trying to clean it all up and push the pistons back in while it's still connected up on the bike.
                        > >
                        > > Tony
                        > > Chelmsford, UK
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "rick" <rhartwick@> wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > >
                        > > > --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "lovemytrophy" <tony.mitchell51@> wrote:
                        > > > >
                        > > > > Loosen the bleed nipple to release the pressure, then spray the whole of the inside of the caliper, including what is protruding of the pistons with WD40. Leave it to stand for a few hours or preferably overnight. Give it another spray with WD40 and get a tooth brush in there to clean out all the crap.
                        > > >
                        > > > Tony,
                        > > >
                        > > > Since WD40 is a petroleum product, I would really worry about exposing the brake seal rubber to it. I have always used brake cleaner or brake fluid, but in my experience, contact with any petroleum based product risks swelling the seal rubber. Is there something special about WD40 that allows it to be compatible with brake seals?
                        > > >
                        > > > Rick Hartwick
                        > > >
                        > >
                        >
                      • lovemytrophy
                        I remember way back as far at the 70s that WD40 was carried around by many motorists and bikers and was sprayed on the distributor and ht leads if there were
                        Message 11 of 25 , May 4, 2012
                          I remember way back as far at the 70s that WD40 was carried around by many motorists and bikers and was sprayed on the distributor and ht leads if there were any damp start problems. Always seemed to work.
                          I can't argue with the results that I saw.

                          Tony
                          Chelmsford, UK


                          --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "a2 - inoperative emessages" <adeux60@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > I guess it's wet and comes in a convenient tin with a little hose. It conducts electricity it's a very short term lubricant, it disperses water about as well as canned air.
                          > It then allows all sorts of shit to stick to ones electrics. It does not solve poor electrical problems long term nor improve insulation breakdown. There are several other spray oils on the market that are better lubricants.
                          > I don't completely dislike the stuff I just don't accept all the extra "properties" not on the tin and I hate the generic use of it - reminds me of the 85% domination of the male shaving market by a marketed product that even claims its for a real man that needs fusion!
                          > Sprained ankles heal themselves.....
                          > Myth busted?
                          >
                          > Clean electrics mmmmm
                          > A2
                          >
                          >
                          > --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, Jack Byers <jackbyers@> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > Hi A2,
                          > > I have used WD-40 on plenty of electrics over the last 40 odd
                          > > years, without a negative outcome even once! I don't doubt the word
                          > > of my fellows, but my experience with it seems so different than what
                          > > I've heard on these pages. I even know guys that swear that WD-40 is
                          > > good for sprained ankles and other pain issues. They say to spray it
                          > > on, and wrap it up good. Relief is on the way! So confusing.
                          > > Kindest regards,
                          > > Poppa Jack
                          > > On May 3, 2012, at 8:33 PM, a2 - inoperative emessages wrote:
                          > >
                          > > >
                          > > > That stuff you are spraying - I wouldn't spray it on my
                          > > > electrics......brrrrrrr...... And I can't think of a reason to
                          > > > disperse water that a dry cloth wouldn't do a better job. It's
                          > > > wetting effect is so short term that it's a waste of time compared
                          > > > to doing proper lubrication. It's the last thing you want on your
                          > > > electrics if you want the bike to start - spray it up your ht leads
                          > > > and you can gauge its immediate negative effect.
                          > > >
                          > > > Carb cleaner is another dubious one to be cautious of....
                          > > >
                          > > > A2
                          > > >
                          > > > --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "lovemytrophy"
                          > > > <tony.mitchell51@> wrote:
                          > > > >
                          > > > > Hi Rick,
                          > > > > Most cleaners are petroleum based, however, in my case, I already
                          > > > knew that the rubber seals were shot, so it didn't make any
                          > > > difference. However, WD40 is recommended for spraying onto most
                          > > > things to prevent water penetration, metalwork, electrics etc. A
                          > > > lot of the stuff around the engine is rubber, yet WD40 can be
                          > > > sprayed on it with no problems. (See someone else's post here about
                          > > > spraying it onto the carb to cylinder head rubbers to check for
                          > > > leaks). Whatever you use, it is much easier to pump the pistons
                          > > > right out prior to removing the caliper from the bike. Then remove
                          > > > the caliper, remove the bleed nipple and you have everything
                          > > > separate to be able to clean it properly. In the case of my rear
                          > > > caliper, the fluid seals were shot and strands of rubber were
                          > > > visible between the caliper and the piston. After removing the
                          > > > pistons, I discovered that whoever had worked on the bike prior to
                          > > > my ownership, had failed to put new dust seals in it. It only had
                          > > > the fluid seals and the grooves where the dust seals are supposed
                          > > > to go were full of crud. I had a right old job cleaning that out
                          > > > without causing any damage.
                          > > > > I bought new seals and pistons kit from a bike accessory dealer,
                          > > > plus I bought a tube of rubber lube for the reassembly.
                          > > > > After lubing the seals and fitting them, a little more of the
                          > > > lube on the sides of the pistons and they went in beautifully. I
                          > > > could hold each piston between finger and thumb and push them in
                          > > > and pull them out again. Very nice easy movement. Pushed them in
                          > > > until flush with the face of the caliper, then refitted the caliper
                          > > > to the bike. Bled the system and pumped the pistons out until I had
                          > > > braking force. No binding or anything after that. The guy that did
                          > > > the MOT was well impressed, said they were working like new.
                          > > > > It sounds like a lot of work, but it is so quick and easy. Much
                          > > > easier than trying to clean it all up and push the pistons back in
                          > > > while it's still connected up on the bike.
                          > > > >
                          > > > > Tony
                          > > > > Chelmsford, UK
                          > > > >
                          > > > >
                          > > > > --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "rick" <rhartwick@> wrote:
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > > --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "lovemytrophy"
                          > > > <tony.mitchell51@> wrote:
                          > > > > > >
                          > > > > > > Loosen the bleed nipple to release the pressure, then spray
                          > > > the whole of the inside of the caliper, including what is
                          > > > protruding of the pistons with WD40. Leave it to stand for a few
                          > > > hours or preferably overnight. Give it another spray with WD40 and
                          > > > get a tooth brush in there to clean out all the crap.
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > > Tony,
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > > Since WD40 is a petroleum product, I would really worry about
                          > > > exposing the brake seal rubber to it. I have always used brake
                          > > > cleaner or brake fluid, but in my experience, contact with any
                          > > > petroleum based product risks swelling the seal rubber. Is there
                          > > > something special about WD40 that allows it to be compatible with
                          > > > brake seals?
                          > > > > >
                          > > > > > Rick Hartwick
                          > > > > >
                          > > > >
                          > > >
                          > > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          > >
                          >
                        • Dennis Anderson
                          I can t stand it anymore, so I m going to add my two cents worth. I ve always hated WD-40 thinking it s a poor excuse for an electronic cleaner and not much of
                          Message 12 of 25 , May 4, 2012
                            I can't stand it anymore, so I'm going to add my two cents worth. I've
                            always hated WD-40 thinking it's a poor excuse for an electronic cleaner
                            and not much of a lubricant. LPS has a better line of products for
                            lubricants. As for cleaning electronic parts the best thing I've come
                            across is a product called Deoxit. I use the DN5 formula that comes in a
                            spray can. It says on the can it's quick drying and safe on plastics. I
                            know the last time I bought this stuff it was about $6.00 for a 5 oz.
                            can, probably more now. However, you pay your money and get what you get.
                            Denny PB
                            1200


                            > I guess it's wet and comes in a convenient tin with a little hose. It
                            > conducts electricity it's a very short term lubricant, it disperses
                            > water about as well as canned air.
                            > It then allows all sorts of shit to stick to ones electrics. It does
                            > not solve poor electrical problems long term nor improve insulation
                            > breakdown. There are several other spray oils on the market that are
                            > better lubricants.
                            > I don't completely dislike the stuff I just don't accept all the extra
                            > "properties" not on the tin and I hate the generic use of it - reminds
                            > me of the 85% domination of the male shaving market by a marketed
                            > product that even claims its for a real man that needs fusion!
                            > Sprained ankles heal themselves.....
                            > Myth busted?
                            >


                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • a2 - inoperative emessages
                            I was waiting for that one....nothing worse in my opinion.....bit like hanging garlic around your neck to cure a cold. It will eventually.... Can t think of
                            Message 13 of 25 , May 4, 2012
                              I was waiting for that one....nothing worse in my opinion.....bit like hanging garlic around your neck to cure a cold. It will eventually.... Can't think of anything worse than to wet the ht side....once it dries it will start eventually.....

                              --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "lovemytrophy" <tony.mitchell51@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > I remember way back as far at the 70s that WD40 was carried around by many motorists and bikers and was sprayed on the distributor and ht leads if there were any damp start problems. Always seemed to work.
                              > I can't argue with the results that I saw.
                              >
                              > Tony
                              > Chelmsford, UK
                              >
                              >
                              > --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "a2 - inoperative emessages" <adeux60@> wrote:
                              > >
                              > > I guess it's wet and comes in a convenient tin with a little hose. It conducts electricity it's a very short term lubricant, it disperses water about as well as canned air.
                              > > It then allows all sorts of shit to stick to ones electrics. It does not solve poor electrical problems long term nor improve insulation breakdown. There are several other spray oils on the market that are better lubricants.
                              > > I don't completely dislike the stuff I just don't accept all the extra "properties" not on the tin and I hate the generic use of it - reminds me of the 85% domination of the male shaving market by a marketed product that even claims its for a real man that needs fusion!
                              > > Sprained ankles heal themselves.....
                              > > Myth busted?
                              > >
                              > > Clean electrics mmmmm
                              > > A2
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, Jack Byers <jackbyers@> wrote:
                              > > >
                              > > > Hi A2,
                              > > > I have used WD-40 on plenty of electrics over the last 40 odd
                              > > > years, without a negative outcome even once! I don't doubt the word
                              > > > of my fellows, but my experience with it seems so different than what
                              > > > I've heard on these pages. I even know guys that swear that WD-40 is
                              > > > good for sprained ankles and other pain issues. They say to spray it
                              > > > on, and wrap it up good. Relief is on the way! So confusing.
                              > > > Kindest regards,
                              > > > Poppa Jack
                              > > > On May 3, 2012, at 8:33 PM, a2 - inoperative emessages wrote:
                              > > >
                              > > > >
                              > > > > That stuff you are spraying - I wouldn't spray it on my
                              > > > > electrics......brrrrrrr...... And I can't think of a reason to
                              > > > > disperse water that a dry cloth wouldn't do a better job. It's
                              > > > > wetting effect is so short term that it's a waste of time compared
                              > > > > to doing proper lubrication. It's the last thing you want on your
                              > > > > electrics if you want the bike to start - spray it up your ht leads
                              > > > > and you can gauge its immediate negative effect.
                              > > > >
                              > > > > Carb cleaner is another dubious one to be cautious of....
                              > > > >
                              > > > > A2
                              > > > >
                              > > > > --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "lovemytrophy"
                              > > > > <tony.mitchell51@> wrote:
                              > > > > >
                              > > > > > Hi Rick,
                              > > > > > Most cleaners are petroleum based, however, in my case, I already
                              > > > > knew that the rubber seals were shot, so it didn't make any
                              > > > > difference. However, WD40 is recommended for spraying onto most
                              > > > > things to prevent water penetration, metalwork, electrics etc. A
                              > > > > lot of the stuff around the engine is rubber, yet WD40 can be
                              > > > > sprayed on it with no problems. (See someone else's post here about
                              > > > > spraying it onto the carb to cylinder head rubbers to check for
                              > > > > leaks). Whatever you use, it is much easier to pump the pistons
                              > > > > right out prior to removing the caliper from the bike. Then remove
                              > > > > the caliper, remove the bleed nipple and you have everything
                              > > > > separate to be able to clean it properly. In the case of my rear
                              > > > > caliper, the fluid seals were shot and strands of rubber were
                              > > > > visible between the caliper and the piston. After removing the
                              > > > > pistons, I discovered that whoever had worked on the bike prior to
                              > > > > my ownership, had failed to put new dust seals in it. It only had
                              > > > > the fluid seals and the grooves where the dust seals are supposed
                              > > > > to go were full of crud. I had a right old job cleaning that out
                              > > > > without causing any damage.
                              > > > > > I bought new seals and pistons kit from a bike accessory dealer,
                              > > > > plus I bought a tube of rubber lube for the reassembly.
                              > > > > > After lubing the seals and fitting them, a little more of the
                              > > > > lube on the sides of the pistons and they went in beautifully. I
                              > > > > could hold each piston between finger and thumb and push them in
                              > > > > and pull them out again. Very nice easy movement. Pushed them in
                              > > > > until flush with the face of the caliper, then refitted the caliper
                              > > > > to the bike. Bled the system and pumped the pistons out until I had
                              > > > > braking force. No binding or anything after that. The guy that did
                              > > > > the MOT was well impressed, said they were working like new.
                              > > > > > It sounds like a lot of work, but it is so quick and easy. Much
                              > > > > easier than trying to clean it all up and push the pistons back in
                              > > > > while it's still connected up on the bike.
                              > > > > >
                              > > > > > Tony
                              > > > > > Chelmsford, UK
                              > > > > >
                              > > > > >
                              > > > > > --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "rick" <rhartwick@> wrote:
                              > > > > > >
                              > > > > > >
                              > > > > > >
                              > > > > > > --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "lovemytrophy"
                              > > > > <tony.mitchell51@> wrote:
                              > > > > > > >
                              > > > > > > > Loosen the bleed nipple to release the pressure, then spray
                              > > > > the whole of the inside of the caliper, including what is
                              > > > > protruding of the pistons with WD40. Leave it to stand for a few
                              > > > > hours or preferably overnight. Give it another spray with WD40 and
                              > > > > get a tooth brush in there to clean out all the crap.
                              > > > > > >
                              > > > > > > Tony,
                              > > > > > >
                              > > > > > > Since WD40 is a petroleum product, I would really worry about
                              > > > > exposing the brake seal rubber to it. I have always used brake
                              > > > > cleaner or brake fluid, but in my experience, contact with any
                              > > > > petroleum based product risks swelling the seal rubber. Is there
                              > > > > something special about WD40 that allows it to be compatible with
                              > > > > brake seals?
                              > > > > > >
                              > > > > > > Rick Hartwick
                              > > > > > >
                              > > > > >
                              > > > >
                              > > > >
                              > > >
                              > > >
                              > > >
                              > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                              > > >
                              > >
                              >
                            • a2 - inoperative emessages
                              Butter is best for getting grease moving....no petoleum solvents to absorb into your skin....
                              Message 14 of 25 , May 4, 2012
                                Butter is best for getting grease moving....no petoleum solvents to absorb into your skin....

                                --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "lovemytrophy" <tony.mitchell51@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > Carb cleaner is a different story altogether, wouldn't use that on anything but stripped down carbs really. Don't know what it would do to plastics, like the floats, despite the instructions to spray it into the carb intake.
                                > WD40 on the other hand belongs to the same group of water dispersants as ACF50 and that is recommended by just every biker I've ever spoken to - for everything. It's a product of the Lear Aircraft Corporation and is used by all of the major aircraft manufacturers for 'fogging' the internals, where all the cabling etc runs to protect against corrosion. If you read any of the major bike mags, it's recommended for spraying the complete bike prior to laying up for winter (those bikers that I call the sunshine kids - who only bring their bikes out when the sun shines and it's 100 dry).
                                > Anyway, I digress, the content of my post was that I used it as a cleaner for my brake caliper and as a lubricant for freeing up the seized pistons. Combined with a nice new hard tooth brush, it's brilliant for cleaning around the exposed area of the pistons as well as the caliper assembly in general. It's also great for getting oil and grease off your hands.
                                >
                                > Tony
                                > Chelmsford, UK
                                >
                                >
                                > --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "a2 - inoperative emessages" <adeux60@> wrote:
                                > >
                                > >
                                > > That stuff you are spraying - I wouldn't spray it on my electrics......brrrrrrr...... And I can't think of a reason to disperse water that a dry cloth wouldn't do a better job. It's wetting effect is so short term that it's a waste of time compared to doing proper lubrication. It's the last thing you want on your electrics if you want the bike to start - spray it up your ht leads and you can gauge its immediate negative effect.
                                > >
                                > > Carb cleaner is another dubious one to be cautious of....
                                > >
                                > > A2
                                > >
                                > >
                                > > --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "lovemytrophy" <tony.mitchell51@> wrote:
                                > > >
                                > > > Hi Rick,
                                > > > Most cleaners are petroleum based, however, in my case, I already knew that the rubber seals were shot, so it didn't make any difference. However, WD40 is recommended for spraying onto most things to prevent water penetration, metalwork, electrics etc. A lot of the stuff around the engine is rubber, yet WD40 can be sprayed on it with no problems. (See someone else's post here about spraying it onto the carb to cylinder head rubbers to check for leaks). Whatever you use, it is much easier to pump the pistons right out prior to removing the caliper from the bike. Then remove the caliper, remove the bleed nipple and you have everything separate to be able to clean it properly. In the case of my rear caliper, the fluid seals were shot and strands of rubber were visible between the caliper and the piston. After removing the pistons, I discovered that whoever had worked on the bike prior to my ownership, had failed to put new dust seals in it. It only had the fluid seals and the grooves where the dust seals are supposed to go were full of crud. I had a right old job cleaning that out without causing any damage.
                                > > > I bought new seals and pistons kit from a bike accessory dealer, plus I bought a tube of rubber lube for the reassembly.
                                > > > After lubing the seals and fitting them, a little more of the lube on the sides of the pistons and they went in beautifully. I could hold each piston between finger and thumb and push them in and pull them out again. Very nice easy movement. Pushed them in until flush with the face of the caliper, then refitted the caliper to the bike. Bled the system and pumped the pistons out until I had braking force. No binding or anything after that. The guy that did the MOT was well impressed, said they were working like new.
                                > > > It sounds like a lot of work, but it is so quick and easy. Much easier than trying to clean it all up and push the pistons back in while it's still connected up on the bike.
                                > > >
                                > > > Tony
                                > > > Chelmsford, UK
                                > > >
                                > > >
                                > > > --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "rick" <rhartwick@> wrote:
                                > > > >
                                > > > >
                                > > > >
                                > > > > --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "lovemytrophy" <tony.mitchell51@> wrote:
                                > > > > >
                                > > > > > Loosen the bleed nipple to release the pressure, then spray the whole of the inside of the caliper, including what is protruding of the pistons with WD40. Leave it to stand for a few hours or preferably overnight. Give it another spray with WD40 and get a tooth brush in there to clean out all the crap.
                                > > > >
                                > > > > Tony,
                                > > > >
                                > > > > Since WD40 is a petroleum product, I would really worry about exposing the brake seal rubber to it. I have always used brake cleaner or brake fluid, but in my experience, contact with any petroleum based product risks swelling the seal rubber. Is there something special about WD40 that allows it to be compatible with brake seals?
                                > > > >
                                > > > > Rick Hartwick
                                > > > >
                                > > >
                                > >
                                >
                              • a2 - inoperative emessages
                                Was it the solvent getting to the carbs that worked? I guess to summarise it s mediocre at best at too many things. There are better individual solutions Eg
                                Message 15 of 25 , May 4, 2012
                                  Was it the solvent getting to the carbs that worked?

                                  I guess to summarise it's mediocre at best at too many things. There are better individual solutions

                                  Eg cleaning brake components with brake fluid
                                  Easy start up carbs
                                  Soap for cleaning
                                  Cleanliness and servicing for easy starting
                                  Chain lube for chains
                                  Silicone or lithium based spray lubricants
                                  Spray detergent for laying up bikes

                                  It just isn't worth using for the short term effect as the consequential neglect has worse implications eg cleaning off grease that would be better left on.

                                  Having said that I asked my local auto shop for di-electric grease.....huh?? I ended up using the rubbish I hate knowing it will let me down considerably earlier than doing the job properly.
                                  A2




                                  --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "a2 - inoperative emessages" <adeux60@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > I was waiting for that one....nothing worse in my opinion.....bit like hanging garlic around your neck to cure a cold. It will eventually.... Can't think of anything worse than to wet the ht side....once it dries it will start eventually.....
                                  >
                                  > --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "lovemytrophy" <tony.mitchell51@> wrote:
                                  > >
                                  > > I remember way back as far at the 70s that WD40 was carried around by many motorists and bikers and was sprayed on the distributor and ht leads if there were any damp start problems. Always seemed to work.
                                  > > I can't argue with the results that I saw.
                                  > >
                                  > > Tony
                                  > > Chelmsford, UK
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > > --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "a2 - inoperative emessages" <adeux60@> wrote:
                                  > > >
                                  > > > I guess it's wet and comes in a convenient tin with a little hose. It conducts electricity it's a very short term lubricant, it disperses water about as well as canned air.
                                  > > > It then allows all sorts of shit to stick to ones electrics. It does not solve poor electrical problems long term nor improve insulation breakdown. There are several other spray oils on the market that are better lubricants.
                                  > > > I don't completely dislike the stuff I just don't accept all the extra "properties" not on the tin and I hate the generic use of it - reminds me of the 85% domination of the male shaving market by a marketed product that even claims its for a real man that needs fusion!
                                  > > > Sprained ankles heal themselves.....
                                  > > > Myth busted?
                                  > > >
                                  > > > Clean electrics mmmmm
                                  > > > A2
                                  > > >
                                  > > >
                                  > > > --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, Jack Byers <jackbyers@> wrote:
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > Hi A2,
                                  > > > > I have used WD-40 on plenty of electrics over the last 40 odd
                                  > > > > years, without a negative outcome even once! I don't doubt the word
                                  > > > > of my fellows, but my experience with it seems so different than what
                                  > > > > I've heard on these pages. I even know guys that swear that WD-40 is
                                  > > > > good for sprained ankles and other pain issues. They say to spray it
                                  > > > > on, and wrap it up good. Relief is on the way! So confusing.
                                  > > > > Kindest regards,
                                  > > > > Poppa Jack
                                  > > > > On May 3, 2012, at 8:33 PM, a2 - inoperative emessages wrote:
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > >
                                  > > > > > That stuff you are spraying - I wouldn't spray it on my
                                  > > > > > electrics......brrrrrrr...... And I can't think of a reason to
                                  > > > > > disperse water that a dry cloth wouldn't do a better job. It's
                                  > > > > > wetting effect is so short term that it's a waste of time compared
                                  > > > > > to doing proper lubrication. It's the last thing you want on your
                                  > > > > > electrics if you want the bike to start - spray it up your ht leads
                                  > > > > > and you can gauge its immediate negative effect.
                                  > > > > >
                                  > > > > > Carb cleaner is another dubious one to be cautious of....
                                  > > > > >
                                  > > > > > A2
                                  > > > > >
                                  > > > > > --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "lovemytrophy"
                                  > > > > > <tony.mitchell51@> wrote:
                                  > > > > > >
                                  > > > > > > Hi Rick,
                                  > > > > > > Most cleaners are petroleum based, however, in my case, I already
                                  > > > > > knew that the rubber seals were shot, so it didn't make any
                                  > > > > > difference. However, WD40 is recommended for spraying onto most
                                  > > > > > things to prevent water penetration, metalwork, electrics etc. A
                                  > > > > > lot of the stuff around the engine is rubber, yet WD40 can be
                                  > > > > > sprayed on it with no problems. (See someone else's post here about
                                  > > > > > spraying it onto the carb to cylinder head rubbers to check for
                                  > > > > > leaks). Whatever you use, it is much easier to pump the pistons
                                  > > > > > right out prior to removing the caliper from the bike. Then remove
                                  > > > > > the caliper, remove the bleed nipple and you have everything
                                  > > > > > separate to be able to clean it properly. In the case of my rear
                                  > > > > > caliper, the fluid seals were shot and strands of rubber were
                                  > > > > > visible between the caliper and the piston. After removing the
                                  > > > > > pistons, I discovered that whoever had worked on the bike prior to
                                  > > > > > my ownership, had failed to put new dust seals in it. It only had
                                  > > > > > the fluid seals and the grooves where the dust seals are supposed
                                  > > > > > to go were full of crud. I had a right old job cleaning that out
                                  > > > > > without causing any damage.
                                  > > > > > > I bought new seals and pistons kit from a bike accessory dealer,
                                  > > > > > plus I bought a tube of rubber lube for the reassembly.
                                  > > > > > > After lubing the seals and fitting them, a little more of the
                                  > > > > > lube on the sides of the pistons and they went in beautifully. I
                                  > > > > > could hold each piston between finger and thumb and push them in
                                  > > > > > and pull them out again. Very nice easy movement. Pushed them in
                                  > > > > > until flush with the face of the caliper, then refitted the caliper
                                  > > > > > to the bike. Bled the system and pumped the pistons out until I had
                                  > > > > > braking force. No binding or anything after that. The guy that did
                                  > > > > > the MOT was well impressed, said they were working like new.
                                  > > > > > > It sounds like a lot of work, but it is so quick and easy. Much
                                  > > > > > easier than trying to clean it all up and push the pistons back in
                                  > > > > > while it's still connected up on the bike.
                                  > > > > > >
                                  > > > > > > Tony
                                  > > > > > > Chelmsford, UK
                                  > > > > > >
                                  > > > > > >
                                  > > > > > > --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "rick" <rhartwick@> wrote:
                                  > > > > > > >
                                  > > > > > > >
                                  > > > > > > >
                                  > > > > > > > --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "lovemytrophy"
                                  > > > > > <tony.mitchell51@> wrote:
                                  > > > > > > > >
                                  > > > > > > > > Loosen the bleed nipple to release the pressure, then spray
                                  > > > > > the whole of the inside of the caliper, including what is
                                  > > > > > protruding of the pistons with WD40. Leave it to stand for a few
                                  > > > > > hours or preferably overnight. Give it another spray with WD40 and
                                  > > > > > get a tooth brush in there to clean out all the crap.
                                  > > > > > > >
                                  > > > > > > > Tony,
                                  > > > > > > >
                                  > > > > > > > Since WD40 is a petroleum product, I would really worry about
                                  > > > > > exposing the brake seal rubber to it. I have always used brake
                                  > > > > > cleaner or brake fluid, but in my experience, contact with any
                                  > > > > > petroleum based product risks swelling the seal rubber. Is there
                                  > > > > > something special about WD40 that allows it to be compatible with
                                  > > > > > brake seals?
                                  > > > > > > >
                                  > > > > > > > Rick Hartwick
                                  > > > > > > >
                                  > > > > > >
                                  > > > > >
                                  > > > > >
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                  > > > >
                                  > > >
                                  > >
                                  >
                                • cdm
                                  So I did remove the calipers. Very simple job really. It s just that the manual led me to believe I could move the pistons with the caliper in place. I did not
                                  Message 16 of 25 , May 5, 2012
                                    So I did remove the calipers. Very simple job really. It's just that the manual led me to believe I could move the pistons with the caliper in place. I did not use WD40 but did spray some in my coffee. I heard it helps with digestion.
                                  • Jack Byers
                                    The guy at Radio Shack said it makes an even better personal lubricant! Poppa ... [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    Message 17 of 25 , May 6, 2012
                                      The guy at Radio Shack said it makes an even better personal
                                      lubricant! Poppa
                                      On May 5, 2012, at 7:27 AM, cdm wrote:

                                      > So I did remove the calipers. Very simple job really. It's just
                                      > that the manual led me to believe I could move the pistons with the
                                      > caliper in place. I did not use WD40 but did spray some in my
                                      > coffee. I heard it helps with digestion.
                                      >
                                      >



                                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                    • a2 - inoperative emessages
                                      Tried that, the bike didn t like the smell
                                      Message 18 of 25 , May 6, 2012
                                        Tried that, the bike didn't like the smell


                                        --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, Jack Byers <jackbyers@...> wrote:
                                        >
                                        > The guy at Radio Shack said it makes an even better personal
                                        > lubricant! Poppa
                                        > On May 5, 2012, at 7:27 AM, cdm wrote:
                                        >
                                        > > So I did remove the calipers. Very simple job really. It's just
                                        > > that the manual led me to believe I could move the pistons with the
                                        > > caliper in place. I did not use WD40 but did spray some in my
                                        > > coffee. I heard it helps with digestion.
                                        > >
                                        > >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        >
                                        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                        >
                                      • lovemytrophy
                                        LOL guys, what started as a simple explanation of the easiest (and safest) way to get the pistons back into the cylinders has turned into a mass debate about
                                        Message 19 of 25 , May 6, 2012
                                          LOL guys, what started as a simple explanation of the easiest (and safest) way to get the pistons back into the cylinders has turned into a mass debate about the merits of WD40 and various other products, which has probably left the original poster permanently traumatised.

                                          I used what was available to me at the time. End of story, each to their own when using what they have on hand or prefer to use.

                                          The long and short of it is that the easiest way to get the pistons back into the cylinders, is to pop them out, remove the caliper from the bike, clean it all, fit new seals if needed, then either using rubber lube or brake fluid, reassemble the clean seals and clean and rust free pistons into the now clean bores. Reconnect the caliper to the bike, bleed it through and pump it to bring the pads into contact with the discs making sure that they don't bind when you release the brake lever. It's easy, quick and by far the safest way, as even trying to prise them back in with an old brake pad in front can lead to one going in more quickly than the other, resulting in them being very slightly mis-aligned as they go back into the bores, not just making it harder, but damaging the softer metal of the bores in the process, so eventually you will have a leak and have to replace the caliper.

                                          New pistons and seals kits are relatively cheap and a far better long term alternative to re-using questionable old parts. The whole job can be done in under two hours.

                                          Tony
                                          Chelmsford, UK


                                          --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, Dennis Anderson <dand9@...> wrote:
                                          >
                                          > I can't stand it anymore, so I'm going to add my two cents worth. I've
                                          > always hated WD-40 thinking it's a poor excuse for an electronic cleaner
                                          > and not much of a lubricant. LPS has a better line of products for
                                          > lubricants. As for cleaning electronic parts the best thing I've come
                                          > across is a product called Deoxit. I use the DN5 formula that comes in a
                                          > spray can. It says on the can it's quick drying and safe on plastics. I
                                          > know the last time I bought this stuff it was about $6.00 for a 5 oz.
                                          > can, probably more now. However, you pay your money and get what you get.
                                          > Denny PB
                                          > 1200
                                          >
                                          >
                                          > > I guess it's wet and comes in a convenient tin with a little hose. It
                                          > > conducts electricity it's a very short term lubricant, it disperses
                                          > > water about as well as canned air.
                                          > > It then allows all sorts of shit to stick to ones electrics. It does
                                          > > not solve poor electrical problems long term nor improve insulation
                                          > > breakdown. There are several other spray oils on the market that are
                                          > > better lubricants.
                                          > > I don't completely dislike the stuff I just don't accept all the extra
                                          > > "properties" not on the tin and I hate the generic use of it - reminds
                                          > > me of the 85% domination of the male shaving market by a marketed
                                          > > product that even claims its for a real man that needs fusion!
                                          > > Sprained ankles heal themselves.....
                                          > > Myth busted?
                                          > >
                                          >
                                          >
                                          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                          >
                                        • a2 - inoperative emessages
                                          PML - as we fix the bikes, we have to ramp up other conversations.... From my experience if you get the lot back together and can slowly rotate the pistons
                                          Message 20 of 25 , May 6, 2012
                                            PML - as we fix the bikes, we have to ramp up other conversations....

                                            From my experience if you get the lot back together and can slowly rotate the pistons then the job is good. If they can't rotate chances are they will stick ie not retract sufficiently to clear the disc.

                                            I also found that if "that stuff" contaminates the disc then a special license is required for disposal....:)

                                            A2




                                            --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "lovemytrophy" <tony.mitchell51@...> wrote:
                                            >
                                            > LOL guys, what started as a simple explanation of the easiest (and safest) way to get the pistons back into the cylinders has turned into a mass debate about the merits of WD40 and various other products, which has probably left the original poster permanently traumatised.
                                            >
                                            > I used what was available to me at the time. End of story, each to their own when using what they have on hand or prefer to use.
                                            >
                                            > The long and short of it is that the easiest way to get the pistons back into the cylinders, is to pop them out, remove the caliper from the bike, clean it all, fit new seals if needed, then either using rubber lube or brake fluid, reassemble the clean seals and clean and rust free pistons into the now clean bores. Reconnect the caliper to the bike, bleed it through and pump it to bring the pads into contact with the discs making sure that they don't bind when you release the brake lever. It's easy, quick and by far the safest way, as even trying to prise them back in with an old brake pad in front can lead to one going in more quickly than the other, resulting in them being very slightly mis-aligned as they go back into the bores, not just making it harder, but damaging the softer metal of the bores in the process, so eventually you will have a leak and have to replace the caliper.
                                            >
                                            > New pistons and seals kits are relatively cheap and a far better long term alternative to re-using questionable old parts. The whole job can be done in under two hours.
                                            >
                                            > Tony
                                            > Chelmsford, UK
                                            >
                                            >
                                            > --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, Dennis Anderson <dand9@> wrote:
                                            > >
                                            > > I can't stand it anymore, so I'm going to add my two cents worth. I've
                                            > > always hated WD-40 thinking it's a poor excuse for an electronic cleaner
                                            > > and not much of a lubricant. LPS has a better line of products for
                                            > > lubricants. As for cleaning electronic parts the best thing I've come
                                            > > across is a product called Deoxit. I use the DN5 formula that comes in a
                                            > > spray can. It says on the can it's quick drying and safe on plastics. I
                                            > > know the last time I bought this stuff it was about $6.00 for a 5 oz.
                                            > > can, probably more now. However, you pay your money and get what you get.
                                            > > Denny PB
                                            > > 1200
                                            > >
                                            > >
                                            > > > I guess it's wet and comes in a convenient tin with a little hose. It
                                            > > > conducts electricity it's a very short term lubricant, it disperses
                                            > > > water about as well as canned air.
                                            > > > It then allows all sorts of shit to stick to ones electrics. It does
                                            > > > not solve poor electrical problems long term nor improve insulation
                                            > > > breakdown. There are several other spray oils on the market that are
                                            > > > better lubricants.
                                            > > > I don't completely dislike the stuff I just don't accept all the extra
                                            > > > "properties" not on the tin and I hate the generic use of it - reminds
                                            > > > me of the 85% domination of the male shaving market by a marketed
                                            > > > product that even claims its for a real man that needs fusion!
                                            > > > Sprained ankles heal themselves.....
                                            > > > Myth busted?
                                            > > >
                                            > >
                                            > >
                                            > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                                            > >
                                            >
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