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Re: Stebel horn install - no sound

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  • brewerswhoop
    ... Joseph Lucas: Lord of Darkness. Haven t heard that for years! :-)
    Message 1 of 7 , Apr 1, 2011
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      --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "slovcan" <slovcan@...> wrote:
      >
      > Yeah, I always heard about the "Darkness by Lucas" thing.

      Joseph Lucas: Lord of Darkness. Haven't heard that for years! :-)
    • Jack Byers
      Hi again Glen, Don t throw the baby out with the bathwater Bro. The buss bar is a very good Idea. There s a short between two power sources. I d wager it is
      Message 2 of 7 , Apr 1, 2011
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        Hi again Glen,
        Don't throw the baby out with the bathwater Bro. The buss bar is a
        very good Idea. There's a short between two power sources. I'd wager
        it is something that you worked on that has you confounded. Were you
        having any kind of electrical problems before you started your
        install? Have you got a wiring diagram for your bike? First off,
        you're going in the right direction by making the power for the buss
        come for a more direct source (batt.), doing so my just cure your
        problem. Use like a 14 amp in-line fuse. No matter what, get the line
        to the buss fused. When it comes to M/C wiring, simple is really a
        good thing. So I would use a 12-gauge lead with an inline fuse,
        joined with a power buss, with 4 posts, and hook it directly to the
        battery through an on/off switch for the most simple set-up for the
        electrically challenged. To do it right, that is to have the
        accessory buss incoming voltage be shut off, when you turn off the
        key-switch. Best would be to come off the "on" or "accessory" tab on
        my ignition switch thru a fused line to that fuss, but taking all
        that apart might be harrowing. So the next best thing is to step down
        one connection to your fuse block (under the seat ). Here you can
        easily find a hot wire that is cut off when the key is in the "off"
        position. you could install a multi-pole, multi throw switch,
        powered by your fused "Hot Wire", and eliminate the buss altogether,
        with a switch. This is a great solution, as you would have that
        entire circuit where when you pull the switch, you have all that
        accessory circuit right in your hands. Couple that with the ability
        to run some devices, and not run others, with the flick of a switch!
        This could be a doo-dadd lover's dream! In any case, you must be
        certain to find your short. I always start by wiggling wires in the
        immediate area that I made any mods to. There's no guarantee that you
        you only have one problem. Loosen up the wire bundle around any area
        you've touched. Making extra sure that there isn't any unnecessary
        "Pull" on wires. Once that group of wires are all free, try out the
        offending circuit several times (paying particular attention to any
        wire that leaks any of its' smoke! Although even European model car
        dealers will usually carry smoke in the "viscos" number you
        personally enjoy when out on the road. Anyhow I wiggle wires, and
        connections, looking for anything that looks out of sorts with
        anything I messed with recently. Did you say you put in a relay? If
        so, you may have not wired it in properly. With your handi-multimeter
        set on infinity, and the Earth wires on the horns disconnected, read
        out each segment of the circuit to ground. When you've isolated the
        circuit by disconnecting at both ends, you can eliminate each run,
        and each connection, by testing each segment, you isolate the trouble
        to within that particular run. Then physically examine the run for
        mechanical faults (bad connection, corrosion, break in insolation,
        burned out fuse or bulb or accessory. Once in a while a wire will
        break inside the insolation, so you cannot see it. It happens when a
        single wire in a Lomb is stretched too tight, eventually it will
        break. Is that relay giving a good "click" ? test the output side of
        the relay for voltage. I always like to not dig into the guts of a
        bike when I'm traveling, so I have always simplified the wiring on my
        bikes. I love getting a "new?" bike, and making the wiring a work of
        art, that will (should it be required) be very easy to work on whilst
        sitting on the side of the road. I suspect you have more that one
        thing wrong. Try breaking it down the least amount possible isolating
        and reading either continuity or voltage working from the outside of
        the bike, in. Please let me know how you're proceeding. I think
        you'll find the problem quickly if you take these steps. Please feel
        free to ask questions as you go. We have some serious "Fixers"
        amongst us, and some guys that have been carrying a major torch for
        the "Triumph" marquis for a long time (me 4 one!) Since I got mine
        new on Sept. 22, 1995, I have only seen a couple bikes that really
        turned me on (like I for just a moment, considered a new bike, but I
        am totally enjoying my '95 BBBB still. As I've often said, I envy you
        fellows that have multiple bikes "That Run!!"
        On Mar 31, 2011, at 8:55 PM, slovcan wrote:

        > Yeah, I always heard about the "Darkness by Lucas" thing.
        >
        > The rear brake light disappeared with this stuff, too. The front
        > brake still lights it up. I used the tail light red wire to trigger
        > the buss bar relay.
        >
        > I think I'm going to toss the buss bar and solder three wires into
        > a ring terminal for the positive battery post - horn, power outlet
        > & the 2-pin trailer-wire type pigtail for future battery charging
        > or what-have-you. Maybe... The buss bar is costing me 0.5 volt. I
        > checked the resistance on adjacent terminals on the buss bar -
        > ~0.650 M-ohms - doesn't seem right to me.
        >
        > Cheers,
        > Glenn
        >
        > --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "John F" <mailman93060@...>
        > wrote:
        > >
        > > This is a British bike, mate. It don't take kindly to air tight,
        > perfect wiring. You need to loosely crimp those connectors and
        > leave a couple exposed to corrosion. Use disparate parts and you'll
        > be right as rain! Except in the rain.
        > >
        > > Good luck! :-)
        > >
        > > Humour aside, I sympathize. You'll find it following our resident
        > electrical wizard's advice (that's Poppa Jack). May you soon be
        > getting the attention of cagers everywhere, at least those coming
        > into your lane!
        > >
        > > John F
        > > Minneapolis
        > > 96 Trophy 1200 BRG
        > > 53,490 miles
        > >
        >
        >



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • slovcan
        Hi Jack, Ha! I work at an airport and love to say Hi Jack ! Anyway PoppaJack, I m working every day for the next week. I really appreciate your - and
        Message 3 of 7 , Apr 2, 2011
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          Hi Jack,

          Ha! I work at an airport and love to say "Hi Jack"! Anyway PoppaJack, I'm working every day for the next week. I really appreciate your - and everybody else's - input. Next days off I'll go through it and let you know what I find.

          Cheers,
          Glenn

          --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, Jack Byers <jackbyers@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi again Glen,
          > Don't throw the baby out with the bathwater Bro. The buss bar is a
          > very good Idea. There's a short between two power sources. I'd wager
          > it is something that you worked on that has you confounded. Were you
          > having any kind of electrical problems before you started your
          > install? Have you got a wiring diagram for your bike? First off,
          > you're going in the right direction by making the power for the buss
          > come for a more direct source (batt.), doing so my just cure your
          > problem. Use like a 14 amp in-line fuse. No matter what, get the line
          > to the buss fused. When it comes to M/C wiring, simple is really a
          > good thing. So I would use a 12-gauge lead with an inline fuse,
          > joined with a power buss, with 4 posts, and hook it directly to the
          > battery through an on/off switch for the most simple set-up for the
          > electrically challenged. To do it right, that is to have the
          > accessory buss incoming voltage be shut off, when you turn off the
          > key-switch. Best would be to come off the "on" or "accessory" tab on
          > my ignition switch thru a fused line to that fuss, but taking all
          > that apart might be harrowing. So the next best thing is to step down
          > one connection to your fuse block (under the seat ). Here you can
          > easily find a hot wire that is cut off when the key is in the "off"
          > position. you could install a multi-pole, multi throw switch,
          > powered by your fused "Hot Wire", and eliminate the buss altogether,
          > with a switch. This is a great solution, as you would have that
          > entire circuit where when you pull the switch, you have all that
          > accessory circuit right in your hands. Couple that with the ability
          > to run some devices, and not run others, with the flick of a switch!
          > This could be a doo-dadd lover's dream! In any case, you must be
          > certain to find your short. I always start by wiggling wires in the
          > immediate area that I made any mods to. There's no guarantee that you
          > you only have one problem. Loosen up the wire bundle around any area
          > you've touched. Making extra sure that there isn't any unnecessary
          > "Pull" on wires. Once that group of wires are all free, try out the
          > offending circuit several times (paying particular attention to any
          > wire that leaks any of its' smoke! Although even European model car
          > dealers will usually carry smoke in the "viscos" number you
          > personally enjoy when out on the road. Anyhow I wiggle wires, and
          > connections, looking for anything that looks out of sorts with
          > anything I messed with recently. Did you say you put in a relay? If
          > so, you may have not wired it in properly. With your handi-multimeter
          > set on infinity, and the Earth wires on the horns disconnected, read
          > out each segment of the circuit to ground. When you've isolated the
          > circuit by disconnecting at both ends, you can eliminate each run,
          > and each connection, by testing each segment, you isolate the trouble
          > to within that particular run. Then physically examine the run for
          > mechanical faults (bad connection, corrosion, break in insolation,
          > burned out fuse or bulb or accessory. Once in a while a wire will
          > break inside the insolation, so you cannot see it. It happens when a
          > single wire in a Lomb is stretched too tight, eventually it will
          > break. Is that relay giving a good "click" ? test the output side of
          > the relay for voltage. I always like to not dig into the guts of a
          > bike when I'm traveling, so I have always simplified the wiring on my
          > bikes. I love getting a "new?" bike, and making the wiring a work of
          > art, that will (should it be required) be very easy to work on whilst
          > sitting on the side of the road. I suspect you have more that one
          > thing wrong. Try breaking it down the least amount possible isolating
          > and reading either continuity or voltage working from the outside of
          > the bike, in. Please let me know how you're proceeding. I think
          > you'll find the problem quickly if you take these steps. Please feel
          > free to ask questions as you go. We have some serious "Fixers"
          > amongst us, and some guys that have been carrying a major torch for
          > the "Triumph" marquis for a long time (me 4 one!) Since I got mine
          > new on Sept. 22, 1995, I have only seen a couple bikes that really
          > turned me on (like I for just a moment, considered a new bike, but I
          > am totally enjoying my '95 BBBB still. As I've often said, I envy you
          > fellows that have multiple bikes "That Run!!"
          > On Mar 31, 2011, at 8:55 PM, slovcan wrote:
          >
          > > Yeah, I always heard about the "Darkness by Lucas" thing.
          > >
          > > The rear brake light disappeared with this stuff, too. The front
          > > brake still lights it up. I used the tail light red wire to trigger
          > > the buss bar relay.
          > >
          > > I think I'm going to toss the buss bar and solder three wires into
          > > a ring terminal for the positive battery post - horn, power outlet
          > > & the 2-pin trailer-wire type pigtail for future battery charging
          > > or what-have-you. Maybe... The buss bar is costing me 0.5 volt. I
          > > checked the resistance on adjacent terminals on the buss bar -
          > > ~0.650 M-ohms - doesn't seem right to me.
          > >
          > > Cheers,
          > > Glenn
          > >
          > > --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "John F" <mailman93060@>
          > > wrote:
          > > >
          > > > This is a British bike, mate. It don't take kindly to air tight,
          > > perfect wiring. You need to loosely crimp those connectors and
          > > leave a couple exposed to corrosion. Use disparate parts and you'll
          > > be right as rain! Except in the rain.
          > > >
          > > > Good luck! :-)
          > > >
          > > > Humour aside, I sympathize. You'll find it following our resident
          > > electrical wizard's advice (that's Poppa Jack). May you soon be
          > > getting the attention of cagers everywhere, at least those coming
          > > into your lane!
          > > >
          > > > John F
          > > > Minneapolis
          > > > 96 Trophy 1200 BRG
          > > > 53,490 miles
          > > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
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