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[SPAM][TriumphTrophy] Re: "fecking" poor?

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  • bulwark41
    Feck as an expletive Vernacular usage of feck in the expletive sense is syntactically interchangeable with fuck, though it has no sexual connotations. This
    Message 1 of 11 , Jul 31, 2008
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      Feck as an expletive
      Vernacular usage of feck in the expletive sense is syntactically
      interchangeable with fuck, though it has no sexual connotations. This
      includes such phraseological variations as fecker (noun), fecking (verb
      or adjective), and feckin' 'ell. It can even be used to describe a
      person: "he's an old feck". It is not uncommon for school teachers and
      some members of the religious order to use the word 'feck' as an
      expletive in Ireland thus demonstrating the word's peculiarity in
      meaning to Ireland where it does not equate to the word 'fuck' as many
      people outside Ireland tend to think.
    • rlkefauver
      So it s more like saying brother tucker instead of mother F@#$er . It s like taking the nasty phrase and turning it into the G rated Beaver Cleaver
      Message 2 of 11 , Aug 4, 2008
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        So it's more like saying "brother tucker" instead of "mother
        F@#$er". It's like taking the nasty phrase and turning it into the
        G rated Beaver Cleaver version...right? I think I heard
        the "brother tucker" version on The Hughley's sitcom.



        > Feck as an expletive
        > Vernacular usage of feck in the expletive sense is syntactically
        > interchangeable with fuck, though it has no sexual connotations.
        This
        > includes such phraseological variations as fecker (noun), fecking
        (verb
        > or adjective), and feckin' 'ell. It can even be used to describe a
        > person: "he's an old feck". It is not uncommon for school teachers
        and
        > some members of the religious order to use the word 'feck' as an
        > expletive in Ireland thus demonstrating the word's peculiarity in
        > meaning to Ireland where it does not equate to the word 'fuck' as
        many
        > people outside Ireland tend to think.
        >
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