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Dealing with Sargent seats

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  • mwhurst@alum.mit.edu
    First, go to their website www.sargentcycle.com and print out all of their instructions. Second, study up on their terms. Third, try to determine what the
    Message 1 of 1 , May 2, 2001
      First, go to their website www.sargentcycle.com and print out all of
      their instructions. Second, study up on their terms. Third, try to
      determine what the changes are, in their terms, that meet your needs.
      Fourth, create full-size templates (white posterboard, cardboard, etc)
      from nose to tail for the middle and side planes (e.g., left, middle
      and right front to back profiles). Fifth, make full size templates
      for the cross section at key points and clearly label on the template
      that it is a cross-sectional template 6", 12", 18", etc back from the
      nose. When making and testing these templates, do NOT do them with
      the seat sitting on a table in front of you. The angles are all
      wrong. Make sure the templates appear to describe a three
      dimensional saddle as you want with the Trophy propped to near
      vertical on the side stand, not the centerstand (wrong front to back
      slope).

      Make sure all the templates are clearly labelled and indexed. Make a
      separate sketch if necessary to show where all the templates are
      designed to fit.

      BE SURE to ask to talk to a technician so you can verbally go over
      everything with them.

      Or, you can just use their standard terms and movements, like move
      the rise back an inch and raise the front platform an inch, leaving
      the nose and rise at the original levels.

      Or, you can use their examples 1-12 and provide the dimensions to the
      critical points.

      Or, what I finally resorted to was removing the seat cover, gluing
      some stiff foam on that came with as computer packing, and carved the
      foam with a razor knife. I used an orbital sander with very rough
      sandpaper to smooth the cuts out. Then I used duct tape to patch and
      hold random pieces together until the whole thing looked and felt
      right. With the rigid foam and the duct tape, I had a pretty close
      to real feel. When done, I shipped it to them and it came back with
      the exactly right profile in the materials, foam, and stitching for
      which they are noted. It might even be that a local upholsterer
      could take it from this kind of model, but I would want to be sure
      they had the experience and materials for doing it right. Remember
      that a m/c saddle is fully exposed to the elements for a large
      portion of its life, unlike auto or boat upholstery.

      Michael
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