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Re: Starting a 96

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  • poteries@yahoo.com
    ... The indicator is working fine. It is not much of a problem to pull the clutch to start, the real problem is under wet wether or after a wash. Sometimes
    Message 1 of 14 , May 1, 2001
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      --- In TriumphTrophy@y..., J Norton <jgnorton621@y...> wrote:
      > I have 96/1200 and no problems starting with clutch
      > not engaged and in neutral. Wonder if it could be your
      > neutral indicator switch?
      >

      The indicator is working fine. It is not much of a problem to pull the clutch to start, the real problem is under wet wether or after a wash. Sometimes it won't start at all. Wait 15 minutes and it will be OK. I suspect that one switch, either the clutch or side stand is taking water.
    • poteries@yahoo.com
      ... Could not be that dangerous, just seems that the bike will not go anywhere if it is not on neutral. I can t start mine if I do not pull the clutch lever.
      Message 2 of 14 , May 1, 2001
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        --- In TriumphTrophy@y..., kperson@t... wrote:
        > On my '96, if the bike is in gear, the clutch must be pulled and the
        > sidestand must be up. But when the bike is in neutral, the clutch
        > does not have to be pulled to start it. I've started it many times
        > with one hand while standing next to the bike before donning
        > earplugs, helmet, gloves, etc. (I'm curious, does anyone think that's
        > a dangerous practice?).
        >
        Could not be that dangerous, just seems that the bike will not go anywhere if it is not on neutral. I can't start mine if I do not pull the clutch lever.

        Most mechanic shop will start the bikes standing beside.
      • Kadosh98@cs.com
        They teach you never to do that in the Safety Course, but they also teach you to not cover your front brake. I disagree with them. The only danger I see from
        Message 3 of 14 , May 1, 2001
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          They teach you never to do that in the Safety Course, but they also teach you to not cover your front brake. I disagree with them. The only danger I see from starting a bike in neurtral is if it slips into gear somehow. Mechanics start them that way all the time. As for covering the brake, I just think it's safer, and Grotsky in the newest Rider magazine agrees.

          - JP


          > I've started it many times
          > with one hand while standing next to the bike before donning
          > earplugs, helmet, gloves, etc. (I'm curious, does anyone think that's
          > a dangerous practice?).
          >
          >
          > --- In TriumphTrophy@y..., poteries@y... wrote:
          > > I have a small problem to solve about starting a Trophy 96 and I
          > need one information from other owners of Trphy 96.
          > >
          > > On neutral, do you need to have the clutch lever in to start or
          > will it start without the clutch lever in.  Mine is funny, sometimes
          > yes, sometimes no and it is possibly the switch that is defective in
          > my case but I am not sure.
          > >
          > > Thank's in advance.
          > >
          > > Trophy 96, 52,000 miles and running well
        • earthfirst35824@yahoo.com
          ... Will start with clutch in while in gear. Will start in neutral without clutch in. You may want to check the side stand cutoff switch!? Joe Swinsick 96
          Message 4 of 14 , May 1, 2001
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            --- In TriumphTrophy@y..., poteries@y... wrote:
            Will start with clutch in while in gear.
            Will start in neutral without clutch in.
            You may want to check the side stand cutoff switch!?
            Joe Swinsick
            '96 Trophy 1200

            > I have a small problem to solve about starting a Trophy 96 and I
            need one information from other owners of Trphy 96.
            >
            > On neutral, do you need to have the clutch lever in to start or will
            it start without the clutch lever in. Mine is funny, sometimes yes,
            sometimes no and it is possibly the switch that is defective in my
            case but I am not sure.
            >
            > Thank's in advance.
            >
            > Trophy 96, 52,000 miles and running well
          • jan.hulstaert@wol.be
            I had a problem with my 98 THUNDERBIRD that I couldn t start in neutral with my sidestand out, when it was up I could start it in neutral or in gear when the
            Message 5 of 14 , May 1, 2001
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              I had a problem with my 98 THUNDERBIRD that I couldn't start in neutral with my sidestand out, when it was up I could start it in neutral or in gear when the clutch was engaged . The fault was in the CDI-box which was replaced under warranty.

              Greetings Jan.('92 Trident 750, '98 Thunderbird sport,'97 Trophy 900)


              --- In TriumphTrophy@y..., "Jeff Fennema" <jeff@h...> wrote:
              > Mine will start in neutral without the clutch pulled in. In gear, I need the clutch pulled in. The clutch interlock switch should only interfere when in gear, the neutral switch should override the interlock.

              > ----- Original Message -----
              > From: poteries@y...
              > To: TriumphTrophy@y...
              > Sent: Monday, April 30, 2001 10:13 AM
              > Subject: [TriumphTrophy] Starting a 96
              >
              >
              > I have a small problem to solve about starting a Trophy 96 and I need one information from other owners of Trophy 96.
              >
              > On neutral, do you need to have the clutch lever in to start or will it start without the clutch lever in. Mine is funny, sometimes yes, sometimes no and it is possibly the switch that is defective in my case but I am not sure.
              >
              > Thank's in advance.
              >
              > Trophy 96, 52,000 miles and running well
            • Richie750
              I prefer to cover the brake with two fingers (index and ring fingers). Studies show that it improves reaction time by .125 seconds. Also, with two finger you
              Message 6 of 14 , May 2, 2001
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                I prefer to cover the brake with two fingers (index and ring fingers).
                Studies show that it improves reaction time by .125 seconds. Also, with two
                finger you are less likely to mash the lever down in a panic situation.
                Like you said JP, Rider magazine just had a safety article on this very
                topic. They agree, covering with two fingers is best. However, it is an
                acquired skill and needs to be practiced. I'll see if I can scan the
                article and post it to the files section.

                Because this will be the second article I've posted from Rider, I have to
                plug the rag. It is the best I've found on general motorcycling. At $10 a
                year (less if you subscribe to a multi-year deal), it is not a bad deal. I
                just re-upped my subscription for 3 years.

                Best regards,
                Richie
                '99 Triumph Trophy 1200
                '90 Suzuki Intruder 750



                > -----Original Message-----
                > From: Kadosh98@... [mailto:Kadosh98@...]
                > Sent: Tuesday, May 01, 2001 8:22 AM
                > To: TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com
                > Subject: [TriumphTrophy] Re: Starting a 96
                >
                >
                > They teach you never to do that in the Safety Course, but they
                > also teach you to not cover your front brake. I disagree with
                > them. The only danger I see from starting a bike in neurtral is
                > if it slips into gear somehow. Mechanics start them that way all
                > the time. As for covering the brake, I just think it's safer,
                > and Grotsky in the newest Rider magazine agrees.
                >
                > - JP
                >
                >
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