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Re: [TriumphTrophy] Suspension

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  • Beardg@aol.com
    In a message dated 12/31/2003 5:07:33 PM US Eastern Standard Time, TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com writes: I m installing new suspension on a 97 Trophy 1200. New
    Message 1 of 15 , Dec 31, 2003
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      In a message dated 12/31/2003 5:07:33 PM US Eastern Standard Time,
      TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com writes:

      I'm installing new suspension on a 97 Trophy 1200. New shock/ spring and fork
      springs and gold valves. Is there anything else I should look at while it is
      apart.

      Dale
      Beardg>There were posts from the past that told of bushing loosness in the
      rear shock linkages.....


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • pbironbutt
      Hello All, I find myself needing to replace both the front and rear suspension components on my 96 1200. They are simply worn out. Before I put stock
      Message 2 of 15 , Jul 3, 2004
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        Hello All,

        I find myself needing to replace both the front and rear suspension
        components on my 96 1200. They are simply worn out. Before I put
        stock replacements in - I was wondering what after market products
        have been used successfully and where to buy/investigate them.

        Thanks:)

        Kevin J. Healey
        Nickname: wizard
        West Palm Beach, FL.
        1996 Triumph Trophy 1200
      • malcpowe@aol.com
        Kevin, have a look at posts for July 7th Hagon shock advice needed . I m just doing the same thing. Cheers, Malcolm R.Powell. Pacific blue BBB [Non-text
        Message 3 of 15 , Jul 4, 2004
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          Kevin, have a look at posts for July 7th "Hagon shock advice needed". I'm
          just doing the same thing.

          Cheers,

          Malcolm R.Powell. Pacific blue BBB


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Tom
          ... Kevin, Can you itemize the parts that you are concerned with? Tom D.
          Message 4 of 15 , Jul 6, 2004
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            --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "pbironbutt" <011wizard@m...>
            wrote:
            > Hello All,
            >
            > I find myself needing to replace both the front and rear suspension
            > components on my 96 1200. They are simply worn out. Before I put
            > stock replacements in - I was wondering what after market products
            > have been used successfully and where to buy/investigate them.
            >
            > Thanks:)
            >
            > Kevin J. Healey
            > Nickname: wizard
            > West Palm Beach, FL.
            > 1996 Triumph Trophy 1200

            Kevin,
            Can you itemize the parts that you are concerned with?
            Tom D.
          • Kevin
            Tom... Well basically front fork springs as well as a complete rear shock. Kevin. Kevin, Can you itemize the parts that you are concerned with? Tom D.
            Message 5 of 15 , Jul 6, 2004
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              Tom...

              Well basically front fork springs as well as a complete rear shock.

              Kevin.

              Kevin,
              Can you itemize the parts that you are concerned with?
              Tom D.





              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Kurt
              Rather than selling my Trophy and buying something new I am looking into ways to upgrade my current ride. Not that I have any problems with the way it handles
              Message 6 of 15 , Jun 2, 2005
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                Rather than selling my Trophy and buying something new I am looking
                into ways to upgrade my current ride. Not that I have any problems
                with the way it handles but I guess when I read articles that say it
                wallows in corners, is more touring than sport, and is softly sprung,
                I start wondering what improvements could be made. Of course the old
                saying, "if it ain't broke, don't fix it" comes to mind since of all
                the bikes I've owned this one is the nicest handling and most fun to ride.

                I've heard about fork emulators, and on previous bikes I've changed
                fork springs and oil weights. My 900 has 30,000 miles so the stock
                shock is probably nearing its life limit and I just read the new file
                that was posted here that showed different rear shock options.

                I guess my overall question(s) is, what have others tried - what works
                and what doesn't.

                Regards,

                Kurt

                PS, Neil, do you get my emails or are you just really busy? :)
              • Tom
                ... Kurt, Also look at the Front Fork Information folder in the files section. Tom D.
                Message 7 of 15 , Jun 2, 2005
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                  --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "Kurt" <krselbert@e...> wrote:
                  > Rather than selling my Trophy and buying something new I am looking
                  > into ways to upgrade my current ride. I just read the new file
                  > that was posted here that showed different rear shock options.
                  >
                  > I guess my overall question(s) is, what have others tried - what works
                  > and what doesn't.
                  >
                  > Regards,
                  >
                  > Kurt
                  >
                  > PS, Neil, do you get my emails or are you just really busy? :)


                  Kurt,
                  Also look at the "Front Fork Information" folder in the files
                  section.
                  Tom D.
                • Kurt
                  Awesome! I hadn t seen that one, it s just what I was looking for. Thanks! Kurt
                  Message 8 of 15 , Jun 2, 2005
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                    Awesome! I hadn't seen that one, it's just what I was looking for.
                    Thanks!

                    Kurt


                    >
                    > Kurt,
                    > Also look at the "Front Fork Information" folder in the files
                    > section.
                    > Tom D.
                  • Kurt
                    How do you find out if you have the Showa or the KYB forks, or does it matter? Kurt
                    Message 9 of 15 , Jun 3, 2005
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                      How do you find out if you have the Showa or the KYB forks, or does it
                      matter?

                      Kurt
                    • Tom
                      ... Kurt, If the stock seals are still installed, the top scraper (dust) seal has an exposed compression spring. That is the starting point but also the VIN
                      Message 10 of 15 , Jun 3, 2005
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                        --- In TriumphTrophy@yahoogroups.com, "Kurt" <krselbert@e...> wrote:
                        > How do you find out if you have the Showa or the KYB forks, or does it
                        > matter?
                        >
                        > Kurt


                        Kurt,
                        If the stock seals are still installed, the top scraper (dust) seal
                        has an exposed compression spring. That is the starting point but also
                        the VIN will assist you if you cross reference it against the parts
                        sheets that are available. The internal bushings are also different,
                        the WORD document that I up-loaded shows that.
                        Tom D.

                        PS: Think, AMERICADE!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
                      • Neil Christie
                        I normally snip aggressively, but Phil says it all and quite well below......so I ll add some without typing repeating stuff. RaceTech Emulators - say $150,
                        Message 11 of 15 , Nov 7, 2006
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                          I normally 'snip" aggressively, but Phil says it all and quite well
                          below......so I'll add some without typing repeating stuff.

                          RaceTech Emulators - say $150, Springs, say $100. Oil, and if you want
                          to fork seals, another $25. Total $275.

                          I installed mine myself - twice (two different bikes) - not difficult,
                          and you don't need to remove the lowers from the sliders so you don't
                          need a fork seal driver, or new fork seals (although if you've many
                          miles on, changing the seals now is a great idea, since you're already
                          90% of the way down that path). An impact wrench (mine is a cheapo
                          electric) will help a lot, and a drill press is handy, but mostly you
                          need patience (and most likely a dremel tool) to deburr the holes you
                          drill into the damping rod and to clean, clean, clean it up.

                          Shipping it to them for install - including new seals and oil and such -
                          if it totals $500, I'd do that in a heartbeat. Not even think twice.
                          Just do it.

                          While the forks are at RaceTech, you can do other stuff - new brake
                          pads, clean up the calipers - and what the hell, new brake lines. The
                          best set up I've found is the dual-line (as in, one line from each
                          caliper all the way to the hand lever) set up from HEL -
                          http://www.h-e-l.co.uk/HEL_Performance_Motorcycle_Brake_Lines_Brake.htm
                          - they even come in coloes to match the bike, and with clean calipers,
                          good pads, and these new lines installed and properly bled, there is no
                          (zero, nada, zip) sponginess or slop in the front brake.

                          One disadvantage - with Race-Tech set up forks and HEL dual brake lines,
                          the back suspension will now get your attention - so you'll be
                          net-surfing for a new shock. The low-end Ohlins is probably the way to
                          go, but I got carried away and installed a WP (formerly White Power)
                          fully adjustable in the rear - overkill, and I'd not buy the same one
                          again.

                          It's winter - at least in the civilized half of the world ;-) - the
                          proper time for projects.

                          Stay safe.

                          Neil

                          >>>>> Original Post <<<<<
                          "Phil Smith" pjsmithres@... pjsmithres
                          Mon Nov 6, 2006 10:13 am (PST)
                          Putting in spacers, blanks, washers, etc or other stuff to reduce the
                          travel/increase the compression of the springs is not what I would
                          suggest. And it doesn't help handling of your weight. it just
                          reduces the dive in the front because it will bottom out faster. a
                          heavier compression spring will do much better. a temporary measure
                          at best.

                          Save up and get the full race tech upgrade.
                          You can get the forks off (or the dealer) and ship to race tech and
                          get back on the road in 1-2 weeks.

                          When I did mine the dealer was going to do a routine fluid change
                          anyway and after the cost of removing the forks and maint on the
                          forks with a seal change I think it was $150 more for the full banana
                          and the dealer talked me into having Racetech do the work as they do
                          it all day and a perfect match to rider. dealer would have to trial
                          and error on drilling the valves and more $$$ to move and remove the
                          forks.

                          They (RACETECH) will set it up per you riding style/request.

                          one of the three must upgrade, upgrades for the Trophy. Best thing
                          to improve the front end reply to the driver.

                          FULL rebuild with emulators (set to your needs) and 0.95 kg springs,
                          oil, and seals and dust boots.



                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Phil Smith
                          RACETECH charges $135 labor plus parts. I got the full rework with seals caps oil etc and insured and shipped UPS for the $500 Plus I didn t have to take the
                          Message 12 of 15 , Nov 7, 2006
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                            RACETECH charges $135 labor plus parts. I got the full rework with
                            seals caps oil etc and insured and shipped UPS for the $500
                            Plus I didn't have to take the time to work on the forks that
                            converts into more time to ride.

                            > I normally 'snip" aggressively, but Phil says it all and quite well
                            > below......so I'll add some without typing repeating stuff.
                            >
                            > RaceTech Emulators - say $150, Springs, say $100. Oil, and if you
                            want
                            > to fork seals, another $25. Total $275.
                            >
                            > I installed mine myself - twice (two different bikes) - not
                            difficult,
                            > and you don't need to remove the lowers from the sliders so you
                            don't
                            > need a fork seal driver, or new fork seals (although if you've many
                            > miles on, changing the seals now is a great idea, since you're
                            already
                            > 90% of the way down that path). An impact wrench (mine is a cheapo
                            > electric) will help a lot, and a drill press is handy, but mostly
                            you
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