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Re: [TriumphTrophy] New TT 1200, Need a Backrest!

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  • Mik
    During a gear change, Skypilot penned ... ... No they have boots ... Yes they do ... ... The other (think I forgot to mention
    Message 1 of 11 , Feb 1, 2002
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      During a gear change, Skypilot <skypilot@...> penned ...
      >RE: Elephants and fat swimmers have "trunks", Triumphs have top boxes :o)

      >and cars, don't forget cars. They have trunks too.

      No they have "boots"

      > Oh ya, and trees theyhave trunks.

      Yes they do ...

      > And one more thing. SO DOES MY TRIUMPH! so there!
      >Ahhh. I feel much better I never realizedhow much I like calling it a trunk!

      The other (think I forgot to mention before) was that homosexuals call
      large penis's "trunks" when they have one "in the departure lounge".
      --
      Ò¿Ó Dame Edna
    • Trevor Collier
      ... From: Skypilot ... want ... realized ... I agree, bikes can have trunks just like anything else, in fact one of my bikes has
      Message 2 of 11 , Feb 2, 2002
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        ----- Original Message -----
        From: "Skypilot" <skypilot@...>


        > RE: Elephants and fat swimmers have "trunks", Triumphs have top boxes :o)
        >
        > and cars, don't forget cars. They have trunks too. Oh ya, and trees they
        > have trunks. And one more thing. SO DOES MY TRIUMPH! If we dingy Yanks
        want
        > to have trunks on our bike we can. And since they don't have Bottom boxes
        > they cant have top boxes either! so there!
        >
        > Ahhh. I feel much better now that I got that off my chest. I never
        realized
        > how much I like calling it a trunk!

        I agree, bikes can have trunks just like anything else, in fact one of my
        bikes has at least 12 trunks but then it is a 'Cagiva Elefant' which is
        covered in pictures of - Elephants.

        Is'nt it wonderful the way the same words mean different things in different
        parts of the world.

        Triumph content part - Help!
        Does anybody know a good way of stopping front brake calipers siezing up on
        a Trophy. I seem to need to dismantle and clear the fronts on my bike every
        3 months over winter and it gets a bit boring!

        Trevor

        12000 Trophy
        650 Elefant - Nellie (what else)
        A65 T -(Titch)
      • Mik
        During a gear change, Trevor Collier penned ... Are you putting a light coating of copper slip on the moving bits ? -- Ò¿Ó
        Message 3 of 11 , Feb 2, 2002
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          During a gear change, Trevor Collier <trevor.collier@...> penned
          ...
          >Does anybody know a good way of stopping front brake calipers siezing up on
          >a Trophy. I seem to need to dismantle and clear the fronts on my bike every
          >3 months over winter and it gets a bit boring!

          Are you putting a light coating of "copper slip" on the moving bits ?
          --
          Ò¿Ó Dame Edna
        • Ken Hastie
          ... Hi Trevor. I had exactly the same problem last winter, and also this winter as well, but not to such a great extent. The obvious answer is don t use your
          Message 4 of 11 , Feb 2, 2002
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            On 2 Feb 02 at 10:09, Trevor Collier wrote:

            > Triumph content part - Help!
            > Does anybody know a good way of stopping front brake calipers
            > siezing up on a Trophy. I seem to need to dismantle and clear the
            > fronts on my bike every 3 months over winter and it gets a bit
            > boring!

            Hi Trevor. I had exactly the same problem last winter, and also this
            winter as well, but not to such a great extent. The obvious answer
            is don't use your bike in the winter, as it is the road salt/crud
            that is doing the damage. However, if like me, you like to ride in
            the winter, then I used WD40 sprayed liberally around the discs
            and calipers. I thought it might have caused the brakes to become
            less effective or perhaps destroy the seals, but neither happened.

            There was one day last winter when my brakes were really locked on
            the disc. WD 40 was a last resort, and it worked.

            I must qualify my answer to say that this was the solution I chose to
            use, and I am not making any recommendation for others. There are
            obvious risks in applying a light lubricant to brakes/disks, and only
            you can decide if it is a wise move or not.


            Ken the Geordie e-mail:ken@...
            BSA A75, A65, A10, B40, D7, D14, D1, Trophy 1200
          • Mik
            During a gear change, Ken Hastie penned ... ... The last thing I would recommend is putting oil (of any kind) on your disks and or brake
            Message 5 of 11 , Feb 2, 2002
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              During a gear change, Ken Hastie <ken@...> penned ...
              >On 2 Feb 02 at 10:09, Trevor Collier wrote:
              >> Does anybody know a good way of stopping front brake calipers
              >> siezing up on a Trophy.

              >There was one day last winter when my brakes were really locked on
              >the disc. WD 40 was a last resort, and it worked.
              > There areobvious risks in applying a light lubricant to brakes/disks, and only
              >you can decide if it is a wise move or not.

              The last thing I would recommend is putting oil (of any kind) on your
              disks and or brake pads, NO NO NO ....

              If the pads are locking onto the disks then use Kevlar (or other
              non-ferrous) brake pads. The brake disks on a Trophy are cast iron, if
              you have sintered (steel) brake pads and you put the bike away wet, then
              the metal content of the pads rusts to the disks.

              I assumed that Trevor was having problems with his callipers seizing not
              his pads ?

              Mik
              BSA ZA10, D7, Trophy 1200 :o)
              --
              Ò¿Ó Dame Edna
            • Trevor Collier
              The last thing I would recommend is putting oil (of any kind) on your disks and or brake pads, NO NO NO .... If the pads are locking onto the disks then use
              Message 6 of 11 , Feb 2, 2002
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                The last thing I would recommend is putting oil (of any kind) on your
                disks and or brake pads, NO NO NO ....

                If the pads are locking onto the disks then use Kevlar (or other
                non-ferrous) brake pads. The brake disks on a Trophy are cast iron, if
                you have sintered (steel) brake pads and you put the bike away wet, then
                the metal content of the pads rusts to the disks.

                I assumed that Trevor was having problems with his callipers seizing not
                his pads ?



                That is a correct asumption, and it is always the left caliper as well.
                Always careful to cover the parts with cooper gease when they go back
                together as well. I guess is must the the salt and stuff they put on the
                roads in the UK. I'll try careful use of WD40 and see it that helps.

                Thank for all the tips

                Trevor
              • Mik
                During a gear change, Trevor Collier penned . ... I m really not recommending that at all, WD40 will travel and penetrate into the
                Message 7 of 11 , Feb 3, 2002
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                  During a gear change, Trevor Collier <trevor.collier@...> penned
                  .
                  > Mik said..
                  >I assumed that Trevor was having problems with his callipers seizing not
                  >his pads ?

                  >That is a correct asumption, and it is always the left caliper as well.
                  >Always careful to cover the parts with cooper gease when they go back
                  >together as well. I guess is must the the salt and stuff they put on the
                  >roads in the UK. I'll try careful use of WD40 and see it that helps.


                  I'm really not recommending that at all, WD40 will travel and penetrate
                  into the brake pads, being petroleum based it will also effect any
                  rubber it comes into contact with ie. The seals in the brake pistons.
                  There must be another reason why you are seizing up, an oversized piston
                  or undersized piston sleeve (?), a drop in fluid pressure (blocked line
                  or faulty banjo) resulting in minimal movement ?
                  Does the calliper seize closed, ie. The pad never wears or wears uneven
                  ?

                  --
                  Ò¿Ó Dame Edna
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