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Track News - INDIANA

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  • Dustin Jarrett
    Looks like Baer Field (IN) Speedway has been closed, at least for the short-term... Promoter closes Baer Field Speedway for the season, future uncertain -
    Message 1 of 11 , Jul 3, 2014
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      Looks like Baer Field (IN) Speedway has been closed, at least for the short-term...


    • rtryfbar2
      Dustin and All: MY OPINION Of course I hate to hear of any track closing, and especially a good one like Baer Field, a track that I have visited five times. I
      Message 2 of 11 , Jul 3, 2014
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        Dustin and All:

        MY OPINION

        Of course I hate to hear of any track closing, and especially a good one like Baer Field, a track that I have visited five times.  I saw USAC Midgets there in the 1980's and Winged Outlaw Sprint Cars there in the 2000's.  We were just there earlier this year for the figure-8's.

        However, I don't have a lot of sympathy (some but not a lot) for those that blame the failure of their promotional business on social media.  This is the second week in a row that was the reason given for a race track closing, as the Bradford, PA promoter said the same thing.

        Social media exists everywhere in every form of entertainment.  For many, it enhances the success of the business.  There are many forms of entertainment that are successful in the era of social media, and that includes certain race tracks.  A frustrating post on this very listserve earlier this year said that someone using their phone at the races would have been better off at home.  People want to be interactive and not passive.  If everyone that uses their phone at a race track were told to stay home, that just put every single track out of business.

        The tracks in the future that survive and flourish will be the ones that embrace technology and social media, and get the fans involved.  Those that are at war with it and use it as a crutch to blame, will unfortunately fall by the way side.

        Besides, for the last 30 years I have been reading that "race fans are the greatest fans in the world".  Was that wrong?

        Guy Smith
      • rtryfbar2
        TrackChasers: While I think of it, here are some examples I have encountered at the races: Track A has a policy of no cameras allowed at any of their event.
        Message 3 of 11 , Jul 3, 2014
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          TrackChasers:

          While I think of it, here are some examples I have encountered at the races:

          Track A has a policy of no cameras allowed at any of their event.
          Track B tells people to use their cell phones to take pictures of themselves having fun at the track, and post them on the track Facebook page.

          Track A has an announcer read the starting lineups while the cars are circling the track and no one can hear.
          Track B takes a quick photo on their lineup sheet and posts it online as soon as it is available so fans in the stands have access to it as soon as the drivers in the pits.

          Track A has their promoter or public relations person arguing back and forth with fans on social media.
          Track B has fans use social media to vote for a most popular driver, and then offers random prizes from among those that vote.

          Can I list a dozen more examples?  Sure.

          Just do an online search of how to take advantage of Facebook and Twitter for your business, and learn from the successes of others.  Do you think a lot of short track promoters are doing that?  Doesn't seem that way to me.

          This topic will make a good column for AARN.

          Guy Smith



          -----Original Message-----
          From: RTRYFBAR@... [TrackChasers] <TrackChasers@yahoogroups.com>
          To: TrackChasers <TrackChasers@yahoogroups.com>
          Sent: Thu, Jul 3, 2014 9:23 am
          Subject: Re: [TrackChasers] Track News - INDIANA



          Dustin and All:

          MY OPINION

          Of course I hate to hear of any track closing, and especially a good one like Baer Field, a track that I have visited five times.  I saw USAC Midgets there in the 1980's and Winged Outlaw Sprint Cars there in the 2000's.  We were just there earlier this year for the figure-8's.

          However, I don't have a lot of sympathy (some but not a lot) for those that blame the failure of their promotional business on social media.  This is the second week in a row that was the reason given for a race track closing, as the Bradford, PA promoter said the same thing.

          Social media exists everywhere in every form of entertainment.  For many, it enhances the success of the business.  There are many forms of entertainment that are successful in the era of social media, and that includes certain race tracks.  A frustrating post on this very listserve earlier this year said that someone using their phone at the races would have been better off at home.  People want to be interactive and not passive.  If everyone that uses their phone at a race track were told to stay home, that just put every single track out of business.

          The tracks in the future that survive and flourish will be the ones that embrace technology and social media, and get the fans involved.  Those that are at war with it and use it as a crutch to blame, will unfortunately fall by the way side.

          Besides, for the last 30 years I have been reading that "race fans are the greatest fans in the world".  Was that wrong?

          Guy Smith


        • ed c
          Track B sounds like Utica Rome. They had a great turnout last Sunday night. The thing with Social Media is if you do things badly, the word can spread quickly.
          Message 4 of 11 , Jul 3, 2014
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            Track B sounds like Utica Rome. They had a great turnout last Sunday night. The thing with Social Media is if you do things badly, the word can spread quickly. However, if you do things well, the same can happen. I do think there are a few people that use social media to bash, bash, and bash. But I doubt many people would take the word of one random person complaining on the Internet. That said, if people see a lot of complaints from different people, they will be hesitant to show up at the races. In short, I think social media might heighten awareness (good or bad) about a track and while there are some complainers, if a track promoter does a good job running a race track, he or she won't have to worry about it harming their business.

            Edward


            On Thursday, July 3, 2014 9:45 AM, "RTRYFBAR@... [TrackChasers]" <TrackChasers@yahoogroups.com> wrote:




            TrackChasers:

            While I think of it, here are some examples I have encountered at the races:

            Track A has a policy of no cameras allowed at any of their event.
            Track B tells people to use their cell phones to take pictures of themselves having fun at the track, and post them on the track Facebook page.

            Track A has an announcer read the starting lineups while the cars are circling the track and no one can hear.
            Track B takes a quick photo on their lineup sheet and posts it online as soon as it is available so fans in the stands have access to it as soon as the drivers in the pits.

            Track A has their promoter or public relations person arguing back and forth with fans on social media.
            Track B has fans use social media to vote for a most popular driver, and then offers random prizes from among those that vote.

            Can I list a dozen more examples?  Sure.

            Just do an online search of how to take advantage of Facebook and Twitter for your business, and learn from the successes of others.  Do you think a lot of short track promoters are doing that?  Doesn't seem that way to me.

            This topic will make a good column for AARN.

            Guy Smith



            -----Original Message-----
            From: RTRYFBAR@... [TrackChasers] <TrackChasers@yahoogroups.com>
            To: TrackChasers <TrackChasers@yahoogroups.com>
            Sent: Thu, Jul 3, 2014 9:23 am
            Subject: Re: [TrackChasers] Track News - INDIANA



            Dustin and All:

            MY OPINION

            Of course I hate to hear of any track closing, and especially a good one like Baer Field, a track that I have visited five times.  I saw USAC Midgets there in the 1980's and Winged Outlaw Sprint Cars there in the 2000's.  We were just there earlier this year for the figure-8's.

            However, I don't have a lot of sympathy (some but not a lot) for those that blame the failure of their promotional business on social media.  This is the second week in a row that was the reason given for a race track closing, as the Bradford, PA promoter said the same thing.

            Social media exists everywhere in every form of entertainment.  For many, it enhances the success of the business.  There are many forms of entertainment that are successful in the era of social media, and that includes certain race tracks.  A frustrating post on this very listserve earlier this year said that someone using their phone at the races would have been better off at home.  People want to be interactive and not passive.  If everyone that uses their phone at a race track were told to stay home, that just put every single track out of business.

            The tracks in the future that survive and flourish will be the ones that embrace technology and social media, and get the fans involved.  Those that are at war with it and use it as a crutch to blame, will unfortunately fall by the way side.

            Besides, for the last 30 years I have been reading that "race fans are the greatest fans in the world".  Was that wrong?

            Guy Smith






          • Dustin Jarrett
            Absolutely agreed.  I would like this status is I could, lol. DJ On Thursday, July 3, 2014 9:23 AM, RTRYFBAR@AOL.COM [TrackChasers]
            Message 5 of 11 , Jul 3, 2014
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              Absolutely agreed.  I would "like this status" is I could, lol.
              DJ


              On Thursday, July 3, 2014 9:23 AM, "RTRYFBAR@... [TrackChasers]" <TrackChasers@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


               
              Dustin and All:

              MY OPINION

              Of course I hate to hear of any track closing, and especially a good one like Baer Field, a track that I have visited five times.  I saw USAC Midgets there in the 1980's and Winged Outlaw Sprint Cars there in the 2000's.  We were just there earlier this year for the figure-8's.

              However, I don't have a lot of sympathy (some but not a lot) for those that blame the failure of their promotional business on social media.  This is the second week in a row that was the reason given for a race track closing, as the Bradford, PA promoter said the same thing.

              Social media exists everywhere in every form of entertainment.  For many, it enhances the success of the business.  There are many forms of entertainment that are successful in the era of social media, and that includes certain race tracks.  A frustrating post on this very listserve earlier this year said that someone using their phone at the races would have been better off at home.  People want to be interactive and not passive.  If everyone that uses their phone at a race track were told to stay home, that just put every single track out of business.

              The tracks in the future that survive and flourish will be the ones that embrace technology and social media, and get the fans involved.  Those that are at war with it and use it as a crutch to blame, will unfortunately fall by the way side.

              Besides, for the last 30 years I have been reading that "race fans are the greatest fans in the world".  Was that wrong?

              Guy Smith


            • rtryfbar2
              Edward, Very good points, especially the fact that the word, good or bad, spreads quickly. As we all know, it is what it is, so every business will have to
              Message 6 of 11 , Jul 3, 2014
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                Edward,

                Very good points, especially the fact that the word, good or bad, spreads quickly.  As we all know, it is what it is, so every business will have to learn to adapt to the fast exchange of information or possibly perish.

                Every restaurant, hotel, airline, etc. has to live with on-line reviews, many of which are going to be negative.  Racing is not alone in that.  Again, it must learn to survive in the world of new media, not wage war against it.

                One thing that stuck in my craw about Baer Field is the promoter seems to think that negative comments have cost him about half of his crowd from last year.  I can buy into the fact that consistent negative reviews might keep people from trying a particular race track (or restaurant) for the first time, but these lost people have previously attended the track.  They are going to judge if it is worth their while to attend based on their personal experience, not the anonymous opinion of someone they don't even know named fartking5000.

                The young man on his phone 80% of his time during the show at Williams Grove may have had a wonderful time at the races.  If he paid $14 and chose to watch what he wanted to watch and use his phone when he wanted to do that, why should we hardcore fans think he would be better off at home, and the promoter out the $14 spent on the ticket?

                We have all heard stories of promoters or track officials telling people if they don't like it here, go somewhere else.  Are we now going to tell them even if they do like it here but we don't like the way they like it here, to go somewhere else anyway?  There isn't a short track in the country that can afford to do that.  Racing is starving for young adults.  That is the demographic group we need the most.

                I pull my hair out every time I read about how the crowds are down because young people's attention spans are not as long.  I have yet to see the studies demonstrating that be cited.  And even if it is true, what could a promoter (or their spokespersons) possibly think will be gained by blaming the customer or potential customers for their circumstances?

                A couple of other things I thought of:

                During the Survivor reunion show they have viewer Tweets scrolling across the bottom of the screen.  Tracks could have fans send Tweets to the track and the announcer could read them throughout the show.  Interactivity.

                Pam and I were at Natural Bridge Speedway this spring.  We wanted to eat at the track but the refreshment stand was so poorly designed and service so slow that there was always a line so I never was willing to wait in it to get us food.  We ended up leaving after the third feature of five and going to a truck stop for a late breakfast buffet.  Decent racing and great breakfast.  We were satisfied.  But the track lost the profit they would have made on the food.  After the fact I received a critical email for using the food lines as an excuse to sneak out early, and was told that I should have just had my wife wait in the line instead.  On the other hand, we were at the Southern Maryland Blue Crabs baseball game, also this spring.  At each seat, there is a small laminated card attached telling you how to text in a food order that will be delivered to your seat.  Effective use of the technology.

                Our own Mike Knappenberger started a Facebook group called "Race Chasers for All Race Fans".  I am not on FB at this time, so I am not a member.  But the way I understand it, the members send pictures and updates during the shows from tracks all over the country.  In one month, he has approved over 800 members (as of last Monday).  Mike has a bigger crowd than Baer Field.  Obviously, they are loving his group and the interactivity.  Do we really want to be telling them they should all either put away the phone or just stay home?

                Additional comments on this interesting topic welcomed.

                Guy



                -----Original Message-----
                From: ed c terrapin44@... [TrackChasers] <TrackChasers@yahoogroups.com>
                To: TrackChasers <TrackChasers@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Thu, Jul 3, 2014 9:52 am
                Subject: Re: [TrackChasers] Using Social Media



                Track B sounds like Utica Rome. They had a great turnout last Sunday night. The thing with Social Media is if you do things badly, the word can spread quickly. However, if you do things well, the same can happen. I do think there are a few people that use social media to bash, bash, and bash. But I doubt many people would take the word of one random person complaining on the Internet. That said, if people see a lot of complaints from different people, they will be hesitant to show up at the races. In short, I think social media might heighten awareness (good or bad) about a track and while there are some complainers, if a track promoter does a good job running a race track, he or she won't have to worry about it harming their business.

                Edward


                On Thursday, July 3, 2014 9:45 AM, "RTRYFBAR@... [TrackChasers]" <TrackChasers@yahoogroups.com> wrote:




                TrackChasers:

                While I think of it, here are some examples I have encountered at the races:

                Track A has a policy of no cameras allowed at any of their event.
                Track B tells people to use their cell phones to take pictures of themselves having fun at the track, and post them on the track Facebook page.

                Track A has an announcer read the starting lineups while the cars are circling the track and no one can hear.
                Track B takes a quick photo on their lineup sheet and posts it online as soon as it is available so fans in the stands have access to it as soon as the drivers in the pits.

                Track A has their promoter or public relations person arguing back and forth with fans on social media.
                Track B has fans use social media to vote for a most popular driver, and then offers random prizes from among those that vote.

                Can I list a dozen more examples?  Sure.

                Just do an online search of how to take advantage of Facebook and Twitter for your business, and learn from the successes of others.  Do you think a lot of short track promoters are doing that?  Doesn't seem that way to me.

                This topic will make a good column for AARN.

                Guy Smith



                -----Original Message-----
                From: RTRYFBAR@... [TrackChasers] <TrackChasers@yahoogroups.com>
                To: TrackChasers <TrackChasers@yahoogroups.com>
                Sent: Thu, Jul 3, 2014 9:23 am
                Subject: Re: [TrackChasers] Track News - INDIANA



                Dustin and All:

                MY OPINION

                Of course I hate to hear of any track closing, and especially a good one like Baer Field, a track that I have visited five times.  I saw USAC Midgets there in the 1980's and Winged Outlaw Sprint Cars there in the 2000's.  We were just there earlier this year for the figure-8's.

                However, I don't have a lot of sympathy (some but not a lot) for those that blame the failure of their promotional business on social media.  This is the second week in a row that was the reason given for a race track closing, as the Bradford, PA promoter said the same thing.

                Social media exists everywhere in every form of entertainment.  For many, it enhances the success of the business.  There are many forms of entertainment that are successful in the era of social media, and that includes certain race tracks.  A frustrating post on this very listserve earlier this year said that someone using their phone at the races would have been better off at home.  People want to be interactive and not passive.  If everyone that uses their phone at a race track were told to stay home, that just put every single track out of business.

                The tracks in the future that survive and flourish will be the ones that embrace technology and social media, and get the fans involved.  Those that are at war with it and use it as a crutch to blame, will unfortunately fall by the way side.

                Besides, for the last 30 years I have been reading that "race fans are the greatest fans in the world".  Was that wrong?

                Guy Smith








              • rpmgordy
                As the author of the frustrating post , I think I need to clear up the meaning for writing what I did. The young man I referred to only looked up from his
                Message 7 of 11 , Jul 3, 2014
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                  As the author of the "frustrating post", I think I need to clear up the meaning for writing what I did. The young man I referred to only looked up from his phone rarely, paying little if any attention to the actual racing. That leads me to believe he had little if any interest in the show at all. If that was the case, he would've been better off staying home. It also leads me to believe that the show itself was sorely lacking, so poor it didn't give this guy a reason to pay attention. I have no idea if he was texting constant results or not. There are many that do that in some perceived competition to be the first to do so. I read such a deal last week at Limaland that updated the top 5 or 10 every lap from Williams Grove. There were 4 people doing so simultaneously providing the same info to the same internet source, Hoseheads. I fail to see how that is a service to anyone or track. How many fans will stay home for any number of reasons knowing all they have to do is go on social media to get the results they now have less reason to attend and garner in person? How many fringe fans have more reasons to stay away? How much revenue has the track lost because of it? How many more tracks will close because they were a marginal operation to begin with and can't afford to lose any more admissions? Social media can be a useful tool for the tracks that are smart enough to treat it seriously. Very few do. Most tracks don't even see the need to maintain a current web site with pertinent info. Lincoln Speedway doesn't even recognize internet members of the press, treating them as "just another freeloader" with no use to them. With coverage of auto racing at an all time low, tracks can't afford to continue presenting lousy shows while turning those that want to help them away. That doesn't mean the competing texters fill that need by any stretch. Their negatives far out way their positives, and would be better off not doing so or stay home IMHO. Race track operators seem to have a long list to give for their failures. Just once, I'd like one of them to own it and admit they weren't up to the task. Probably won't happen in my lifetime.
                   
                  Gordy
                • Gordon Killian
                  Guy, I ll see you at track B. Should make a fine column, indeed. Gordy Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID ... Guy, ���� I ll see you at track B. Should
                  Message 8 of 11 , Jul 3, 2014
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                    Guy,
                         I'll see you at track B. Should make a fine column, indeed.

                    Gordy

                    Sent from my Verizon Wireless 4G LTE DROID


                    "RTRYFBAR@... [TrackChasers]" <TrackChasers@yahoogroups.com> wrote:

                    TrackChasers:

                    While I think of it, here are some examples I have encountered at the races:

                    Track A has a policy of no cameras allowed at any of their event.
                    Track B tells people to use their cell phones to take pictures of themselves having fun at the track, and post them on the track Facebook page.

                    Track A has an announcer read the starting lineups while the cars are circling the track and no one can hear.
                    Track B takes a quick photo on their lineup sheet and posts it online as soon as it is available so fans in the stands have access to it as soon as the drivers in the pits.

                    Track A has their promoter or public relations person arguing back and forth with fans on social media.
                    Track B has fans use social media to vote for a most popular driver, and then offers random prizes from among those that vote.

                    Can I list a dozen more examples?  Sure.

                    Just do an online search of how to take advantage of Facebook and Twitter for your business, and learn from the successes of others.  Do you think a lot of short track promoters are doing that?  Doesn't seem that way to me.

                    This topic will make a good column for AARN.

                    Guy Smith



                    -----Original Message-----
                    From: RTRYFBAR@... [TrackChasers] <TrackChasers@yahoogroups.com>
                    To: TrackChasers <TrackChasers@yahoogroups.com>
                    Sent: Thu, Jul 3, 2014 9:23 am
                    Subject: Re: [TrackChasers] Track News - INDIANA



                    Dustin and All:

                    MY OPINION

                    Of course I hate to hear of any track closing, and especially a good one like Baer Field, a track that I have visited five times.  I saw USAC Midgets there in the 1980's and Winged Outlaw Sprint Cars there in the 2000's.  We were just there earlier this year for the figure-8's.

                    However, I don't have a lot of sympathy (some but not a lot) for those that blame the failure of their promotional business on social media.  This is the second week in a row that was the reason given for a race track closing, as the Bradford, PA promoter said the same thing.

                    Social media exists everywhere in every form of entertainment.  For many, it enhances the success of the business.  There are many forms of entertainment that are successful in the era of social media, and that includes certain race tracks.  A frustrating post on this very listserve earlier this year said that someone using their phone at the races would have been better off at home.  People want to be interactive and not passive.  If everyone that uses their phone at a race track were told to stay home, that just put every single track out of business.

                    The tracks in the future that survive and flourish will be the ones that embrace technology and social media, and get the fans involved.  Those that are at war with it and use it as a crutch to blame, will unfortunately fall by the way side.

                    Besides, for the last 30 years I have been reading that "race fans are the greatest fans in the world".  Was that wrong?

                    Guy Smith


                  • Roger Ferrell
                    I think there is other problems going on. Cant s cuss out drivers, crew members, fans, and little kids. Some teams didn t like the hard safety inspection the
                    Message 9 of 11 , Jul 4, 2014
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                       I think there is other problems going on.
                       
                         Cant's cuss out drivers, crew members, fans, and little kids.
                       
                         Some teams didn't like the hard safety inspection the track did. All cars must have removable steering wheel. 
                       
                         Could be something else I won't said on this form.
                       
                         This hit hard for me sense I call Baer Field  home. Only go couple times a year but, I always said going to Baer Field was like going home.
                       
                        If things don't change Gas City might be the next one to fall.   
                       
                             Roger

                       

                       

                      To: TrackChasers@yahoogroups.com
                      From: TrackChasers@yahoogroups.com
                      Date: Thu, 3 Jul 2014 07:35:14 -0700
                      Subject: Re: [TrackChasers] Track News - INDIANA

                       
                      Absolutely agreed.  I would "like this status" is I could, lol.
                      DJ


                      On Thursday, July 3, 2014 9:23 AM, "RTRYFBAR@... [TrackChasers]" <TrackChasers@yahoogroups.com> wrote:


                       
                      Dustin and All:

                      MY OPINION

                      Of course I hate to hear of any track closing, and especially a good one like Baer Field, a track that I have visited five times.  I saw USAC Midgets there in the 1980's and Winged Outlaw Sprint Cars there in the 2000's.  We were just there earlier this year for the figure-8's.

                      However, I don't have a lot of sympathy (some but not a lot) for those that blame the failure of their promotional business on social media.  This is the second week in a row that was the reason given for a race track closing, as the Bradford, PA promoter said the same thing.

                      Social media exists everywhere in every form of entertainment.  For many, it enhances the success of the business.  There are many forms of entertainment that are successful in the era of social media, and that includes certain race tracks.  A frustrating post on this very listserve earlier this year said that someone using their phone at the races would have been better off at home.  People want to be interactive and not passive.  If everyone that uses their phone at a race track were told to stay home, that just put every single track out of business.

                      The tracks in the future that survive and flourish will be the ones that embrace technology and social media, and get the fans involved.  Those that are at war with it and use it as a crutch to blame, will unfortunately fall by the way side.

                      Besides, for the last 30 years I have been reading that "race fans are the greatest fans in the world".  Was that wrong?

                      Guy Smith



                    • Roger Ferrell
                      Bruce and Pat, Mike, Gordy and Guy Would you guys send me a text so I can have your numbers again. I turn off my phone couple miles from home last Saturday.
                      Message 10 of 11 , Jul 4, 2014
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                         Bruce and Pat, Mike, Gordy and Guy

                         

                           Would you guys send me a text so I can have your numbers again. I turn off my phone couple miles from home last Saturday. Had it in my hands after getting out of the van in the garage, that last time I seen it. Brenda said I throw it the trash.

                         

                                                thanks Roger 


                         


                         
                           




























                      • colin herridge
                        Guy in UK we have 2 main stock car sites and at every meeting results are relayed to a person sat at home who doesn t go very often now and puts the results
                        Message 11 of 11 , Jul 5, 2014
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                          Guy
                          in UK we have 2 main stock car sites and at every meeting results are relayed to a person sat at home who doesn't go very often now and puts the results and any interesting 'happenings' on them and FB which is great for those that can't go for any reason
                          Colin


                          On Thursday, 3 July 2014, 16:38, "RTRYFBAR@... [TrackChasers]" <TrackChasers@yahoogroups.com> wrote:




                          Edward,

                          Very good points, especially the fact that the word, good or bad, spreads quickly.  As we all know, it is what it is, so every business will have to learn to adapt to the fast exchange of information or possibly perish.

                          Every restaurant, hotel, airline, etc. has to live with on-line reviews, many of which are going to be negative.  Racing is not alone in that.  Again, it must learn to survive in the world of new media, not wage war against it.

                          One thing that stuck in my craw about Baer Field is the promoter seems to think that negative comments have cost him about half of his crowd from last year.  I can buy into the fact that consistent negative reviews might keep people from trying a particular race track (or restaurant) for the first time, but these lost people have previously attended the track.  They are going to judge if it is worth their while to attend based on their personal experience, not the anonymous opinion of someone they don't even know named fartking5000.

                          The young man on his phone 80% of his time during the show at Williams Grove may have had a wonderful time at the races.  If he paid $14 and chose to watch what he wanted to watch and use his phone when he wanted to do that, why should we hardcore fans think he would be better off at home, and the promoter out the $14 spent on the ticket?

                          We have all heard stories of promoters or track officials telling people if they don't like it here, go somewhere else.  Are we now going to tell them even if they do like it here but we don't like the way they like it here, to go somewhere else anyway?  There isn't a short track in the country that can afford to do that.  Racing is starving for young adults.  That is the demographic group we need the most.

                          I pull my hair out every time I read about how the crowds are down because young people's attention spans are not as long.  I have yet to see the studies demonstrating that be cited.  And even if it is true, what could a promoter (or their spokespersons) possibly think will be gained by blaming the customer or potential customers for their circumstances?

                          A couple of other things I thought of:

                          During the Survivor reunion show they have viewer Tweets scrolling across the bottom of the screen.  Tracks could have fans send Tweets to the track and the announcer could read them throughout the show.  Interactivity.

                          Pam and I were at Natural Bridge Speedway this spring.  We wanted to eat at the track but the refreshment stand was so poorly designed and service so slow that there was always a line so I never was willing to wait in it to get us food.  We ended up leaving after the third feature of five and going to a truck stop for a late breakfast buffet.  Decent racing and great breakfast.  We were satisfied.  But the track lost the profit they would have made on the food.  After the fact I received a critical email for using the food lines as an excuse to sneak out early, and was told that I should have just had my wife wait in the line instead.  On the other hand, we were at the Southern Maryland Blue Crabs baseball game, also this spring.  At each seat, there is a small laminated card attached telling you how to text in a food order that will be delivered to your seat.  Effective use of the technology.

                          Our own Mike Knappenberger started a Facebook group called "Race Chasers for All Race Fans".  I am not on FB at this time, so I am not a member.  But the way I understand it, the members send pictures and updates during the shows from tracks all over the country.  In one month, he has approved over 800 members (as of last Monday).  Mike has a bigger crowd than Baer Field.  Obviously, they are loving his group and the interactivity.  Do we really want to be telling them they should all either put away the phone or just stay home?

                          Additional comments on this interesting topic welcomed.

                          Guy



                          -----Original Message-----
                          From: ed c terrapin44@... [TrackChasers] <TrackChasers@yahoogroups.com>
                          To: TrackChasers <TrackChasers@yahoogroups.com>
                          Sent: Thu, Jul 3, 2014 9:52 am
                          Subject: Re: [TrackChasers] Using Social Media



                          Track B sounds like Utica Rome. They had a great turnout last Sunday night. The thing with Social Media is if you do things badly, the word can spread quickly. However, if you do things well, the same can happen. I do think there are a few people that use social media to bash, bash, and bash. But I doubt many people would take the word of one random person complaining on the Internet. That said, if people see a lot of complaints from different people, they will be hesitant to show up at the races. In short, I think social media might heighten awareness (good or bad) about a track and while there are some complainers, if a track promoter does a good job running a race track, he or she won't have to worry about it harming their business.

                          Edward


                          On Thursday, July 3, 2014 9:45 AM, "RTRYFBAR@... [TrackChasers]" <TrackChasers@yahoogroups.com> wrote:




                          TrackChasers:

                          While I think of it, here are some examples I have encountered at the races:

                          Track A has a policy of no cameras allowed at any of their event.
                          Track B tells people to use their cell phones to take pictures of themselves having fun at the track, and post them on the track Facebook page.

                          Track A has an announcer read the starting lineups while the cars are circling the track and no one can hear.
                          Track B takes a quick photo on their lineup sheet and posts it online as soon as it is available so fans in the stands have access to it as soon as the drivers in the pits.

                          Track A has their promoter or public relations person arguing back and forth with fans on social media.
                          Track B has fans use social media to vote for a most popular driver, and then offers random prizes from among those that vote.

                          Can I list a dozen more examples?  Sure.

                          Just do an online search of how to take advantage of Facebook and Twitter for your business, and learn from the successes of others.  Do you think a lot of short track promoters are doing that?  Doesn't seem that way to me.

                          This topic will make a good column for AARN.

                          Guy Smith



                          -----Original Message-----
                          From: RTRYFBAR@... [TrackChasers] <TrackChasers@yahoogroups.com>
                          To: TrackChasers <TrackChasers@yahoogroups.com>
                          Sent: Thu, Jul 3, 2014 9:23 am
                          Subject: Re: [TrackChasers] Track News - INDIANA



                          Dustin and All:

                          MY OPINION

                          Of course I hate to hear of any track closing, and especially a good one like Baer Field, a track that I have visited five times.  I saw USAC Midgets there in the 1980's and Winged Outlaw Sprint Cars there in the 2000's.  We were just there earlier this year for the figure-8's.

                          However, I don't have a lot of sympathy (some but not a lot) for those that blame the failure of their promotional business on social media.  This is the second week in a row that was the reason given for a race track closing, as the Bradford, PA promoter said the same thing.

                          Social media exists everywhere in every form of entertainment.  For many, it enhances the success of the business.  There are many forms of entertainment that are successful in the era of social media, and that includes certain race tracks.  A frustrating post on this very listserve earlier this year said that someone using their phone at the races would have been better off at home.  People want to be interactive and not passive.  If everyone that uses their phone at a race track were told to stay home, that just put every single track out of business.

                          The tracks in the future that survive and flourish will be the ones that embrace technology and social media, and get the fans involved.  Those that are at war with it and use it as a crutch to blame, will unfortunately fall by the way side.

                          Besides, for the last 30 years I have been reading that "race fans are the greatest fans in the world".  Was that wrong?

                          Guy Smith












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