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Hugh Pugh (1746-1818) Huge Brick Wall Coming Down

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  • jkpugh_mi
    Hi, My name is Jeff Pugh. I created this group to take genealogical research on the Pugh lines to the next level. This Pugh group is unique in that it
    Message 1 of 3 , Nov 14, 2006
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      Hi,

      My name is Jeff Pugh. I created this group to take genealogical
      research on the Pugh lines to the next level. This Pugh group is
      unique in that it incorporates the science of DNA analysis into the
      study of Pugh genealogy.

      I began genealogical research about a year ago and soon discovered
      that may ggg-grandfather was Lewis Pugh (1811-1882). Lewis was
      probably born in what is now Hancock County, WV. Hancock County is
      the northernmost tip of the little finger of WV that lies between OH
      on the west and PA on the east. From March to July of this year, my
      focus was on the Hugh Pugh (1746-1818)line. Hugh brought his family
      to Brooke County, VA (now Hancock County, WV) about 1800. I have
      studied the growth of this one Pugh line and it is incredible!!

      Since July, I have been researching other Pugh lines, particularly
      those that migrated west across PA. I have a number of theories as
      to where my Lewis came from, and many involve the Hugh Pugh line, but
      last Thursday I received some very exciting news. I submitted to a
      DNA project back in June and, for the longest time, I did not
      match any of the lines represented there. Well, last Thursday I got
      a match. What a great feeling!! The person that I matched comes
      from the Robert ap Hugh (1655-1717) line. Great news for me and
      very compelling news for those working on other Pennsylvania Pugh
      lines. The Pugh DNA database is growing, but it is growing rather
      slowly at this point. I would like to see the research take off at
      a faster clip.

      There has been quite a bit of work done on what I refer to as the
      Hugh Pugh line but nothing I have seen accurately goes back any
      further than Hugh's father, Hugh Pugh (1712-1754). In my
      nomenclature, the father is Hugh Pugh I and the son is Hugh Pugh
      II. I have adopted this nomenclature to allow for simplified
      communications when working with other researchers on the Hugh Pugh
      line.

      As we all know, there were many Hugh Pughs and some researchers have
      confused Hugh Pugh I who lived in Machackemeck, NY with another Hugh
      Pugh (1699-1749) who married Mary Cadwallader Jones. This Hugh
      lived and died in Chester County, PA and also had a son, Hugh Pugh
      (1748-??) who married Mary Cyder. The son, Hugh, had only one hand,
      according to his father's will, and became a well known school
      teacher. The two Hughs just mentioned are of the James M. Pugh I
      (my nomenclature again) line, who was the son of Evan and Sarah (??)
      Pugh. It is possible that all of these Hughs are related, but I
      have not discovered the connection yet. You can see the potential
      in this information, however, since I currently have Evan as a
      brother to Robert ap Hugh. Ellis is also thought to be related to
      this line.

      Future DNA testing of individuals will help to prove (or disprove)
      the relationships that I just mentioned. I also believe that there
      is a very high liklihood that the Hugh Pugh (1746-1818) line that
      grew out of what is now Hancock County, WV is actually related to
      the Robert ap Hugh, Evan Pugh and Ellis Pugh lines. It would be
      amazing if we could connect all of these lines through DNA testing!!

      There are currently only 23 Pughs involved in the DNA study and none
      at all are known to be of the Hugh Pugh line. We definitely need
      some Pughs from the Evan and Ellis lines as well. There are many
      Pughs that can trace their ancestry back to Pennsylvania but get
      stuck in the 1800's. Unless their ancesters were of the Quaker
      faith or belonged to one of the more organized Church of England
      parishes, the early records are scant. Fortunately, the science of
      DNA analysis is now being applied to genealogical research. The
      more people that get involved, the quicker some big questions will
      be answered.
    • monetad7
      Hi Jeff, Congratulations on your new genealogy group. There certainly is a need for a discussion group like yours. I agree with you that DNA testing can be a
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 14, 2006
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        Hi Jeff,

        Congratulations on your new genealogy group. There certainly is a
        need for a discussion group like yours. I agree with you that DNA
        testing can be a great help to genealogists that are facing a dead-
        end/brickwall situation.

        My research was helped by DNA testing. I had a generation in my
        lineage where there was no documentation to prove a father-son
        relationship; all I had was circumstantial evidence. My Pugh family
        was from the south but the same strategy can be used anywhere. To
        prove the relationship, I had to locate every existing document for
        this Pugh family, i.e., land, court, wills, probate, tax, military,
        and try to reconstruct the family. Records were scarce.

        My fifth great-grandfather Henry Pugh, born in 1711 in Richmond
        County, Virginia mentioned only two of his children in his will and
        said "I leave the rest of my estate to my other children." He left no
        other records that named his children. The other eight (probable)
        children had to be proved through their relationships with each other
        and the two children named in the will. I ultimately proved the
        kinship by comparing the DNA of my uncle who was a descendant of
        Henry with descendants of Henry's proven brothers.

        Lewis Pugh was Henry's father. Lewis Pugh was our immigrant ancestor
        who came to Virginia in 1695 from Merionethshire, Wales. He had four
        other sons besides Henry. Here we are in the year 2006 and have a
        group of eight men (and growing) with a paper trail back to Lewis
        Pugh who have the same Y-chromosome DNA results. We are hoping to
        connect with more descendants of this Lewis Pugh to strengthen the
        pool of information and learn more about our Welsh origins.

        I believe that DNA testing can strengthen and confirm our paper trail
        research as well as open doors to new connections and possibilities.

        Thanks again, Jeff,
        Daniela
      • Jeff Pugh
        Daniela, Thank you for sharing your information with us. I am receiving many questions about how DNA testing can be used to help with genealogical research
        Message 3 of 3 , Nov 15, 2006
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          Daniela,

          Thank you for sharing your information with us. I am receiving many
          questions about how DNA testing can be used to help with genealogical
          research and I am trying to answer them the best that I can. Your
          story is an excellent example of how DNA can help us. I would
          encourage members to post any DNA questions right here so that we can
          all benefit from the discussion.

          When I set this site up yesterday, my focus was much too narrow. The
          name of the site "Pughs in Pennsylvania" now sounds very limiting to
          me. My first message explains to some extent what my goals were in
          setting up the site. Basically I wanted to let everyone know that DNA
          analysis is beginning to help geneologists in many ways. It was not my
          intent to exclude any Pugh lines from participating in our
          discussions. We have much to learn from each other. I am very open to
          ideas for a better name for this site. For now, I have changed the
          name to include the Lewis Pugh line and others that arrived in
          Virginia. That probably accounts for most of the Pugh lines in
          America, but again, I do not want to exclude anyone.

          I am hoping that in the near future we will determine how closely all
          of the documented Pugh lines are related genetically. Correct me if I
          am wrong Daniela but I believe that we now know from the DNA study that
          the Lewis Pugh (1674-1741) line that arrived in Richmond County, VA in
          the early 1700's is not very closely related to the Pugh lines that I
          mentioned in my first email message. Wait, I will correct myself. We
          do not have all of those Pugh lines represented in the testing yet, so
          we cannot jump to that conclusion at this time.

          In the next few days, I will try to describe the early Pugh lines in
          America as best I can. I will do that through individual messages on
          this board. I would appreciate any input (corrections, etc.) that
          members of this group can provide. I feel relatively comfortable with
          what I call the Hugh Pugh line which grew out of what is now New
          Manchester, WV but I have not had the opportunity to study the other
          Pugh lines all that closely. Still, I may be able to get the ball
          rolling with a brief description of what I currently believe about each
          of these lines.

          Any and all questions, comments and suggestions are most welcome.
          Ultimately, the DNA study could lead to us finding close cousins from
          branches of our lines that remained in Wales. I have already matched a
          number of individuals that do not even carry the Pugh surname. This
          could provide us with additional clues as we reach back to the time in
          Great Britian before the use of surnames was common practice. So,
          calling the Group "Pughs in Pennsylvania" was simply a mistake. I
          apologize for that.

          I am looking forward to working with everyone to learn everything we
          can about our heritage.

          Jeff
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