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Tugging On A Heartstring & Tugging On A Hearstring: The Sequel...

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  • Jim Pelletier
    Two great books by Emily V. Lambert first regarding the Tug Babe... Tugging On A Heartstring & Tugging On A Heartstring: The Sequel Basic Bibliographic Date
    Message 1 of 1 , Dec 28, 2010
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      Two great books by Emily V. Lambert first regarding the Tug Babe...

       

      Tugging On A Heartstring & Tugging On A Heartstring: The Sequel

       

      Basic Bibliographic Date

       

      Available from Marine Techniques Publishing

      126 Western Avenue, Suite 266

      Augusta, ME  04330-7249

      Phone:  (207) 622-7984

      Fax:  (207) 621-0821

      Email:  Info@...

      Web Site:  www.MarineTechPublishing.com/

       

      ISBN 13: 978-0-9798008-2-5

      Title:  Tugging On A Heartstring
      Life on a Family Tugboat on the Chesapeake Bay

      Author: Emily V. Lambert

      Publisher:  Marine Techniques Publishing, Augusta, Maine U.S.A.

      Format:  Paper – perfect bound

      Price:  $11.95

      Pages:  204

      Publication Date:  July 2009

      BISAC Audience:  Teens and Adults

      BISAC Subject:  Biography & Autobiography BIO000000

       

      Narrative:

      This is the true story in the 1970's of a young 13 year old teenage girl living and working on the Chesapeake Bay. Emily Lambert was a documented AB (able-bodied seaman) merchant mariner, by her 19th birthday and with her father as Captain and mother as first mate - her mother being "the first woman licensed as tugboat operator in the United States" - Emily and her five older sisters worked on their non-union family tugboat. Strength and courage held the Lambert family together with the only girls crewing on a commercial ship on the Chesapeake. From dangerous action to delightful comedy, this is an unforgettable voyage for all ages.

       

      Tugging On A Heartstring is the comical and gritty true sea story of a family of teenage girls in the United States Merchant Marine.

       

      Emily Lambert, author, was the youngest of six daughters. She was a licensed Able Bodied seawoman by the age of 19, after suffering near-fatal injuries from a spinning winch wheel at age 18. Tugging On A Heartstring is the story of her sea adventures, from age 13 to 16, of living and working on her family’s 1906 converted steamer Babe.

       

      With no sons, the Lamberts’ tugboat Babe was women-crewed. Mrs. Deborah Lambert, first mate and mother, became the first woman licensed tugboat operator in the United States.

       

      Strength and courage held the Lambert family together with the only girls crewing a commercial ship on the Chesapeake in the 1970’s. From delightful comedy to dangerous sea action, this is an unforgettable voyage for all ages.

       

      About the Author:

      Emily Lambert worked for several more years on her family's next tug, a 1945 DPC class called the Nanticoke, and sailed two voyages on a T-5 tanker. While raising a family, she became a sportswriter in newspaper and a sports personality on television. She became the first woman sports columnist at her city paper. After winning two writing awards in her field, one national, she retired to write this book, and, to resume a college career interrupted by the winch wheel incident.

       

      Book Reviews:

       

      E.V Lambert has a very special book here. Amazing how an adult can tell her story through her childhood's eyes. Story is told effectively and with feeling. I hope Ms. Lambert will have more books forthcoming. An excellent read.  - Robert Andrews, Haines, Alaska

       

      "As a very young girl, Emily Vaughan Lambert may have chewed tobacco, but she was female, make no doubt about that! This story is told in first person, and what an intriquing tale it is! Chesapeake Bay tugboating is well-described and authentic, from bucolic to nasty-difficult.. utterly fascinating. Now, if only there was another sequel…"
      - Hugh Ware, Tugbitts - Summer/Autumn 2008

       

      "Dear Mrs. Lambert
      Just to let you know how much I enjoyed your book and now that I see from your website that you have a sequel on the way I will anxiously look forward to that. Will watch your website for availability.................

      Thanks again for sharing stories of a wonderful family. With admiration.........

      Ron Hansen
      Omaha Nebraska"

       

      "These two spare little books present a world that few of us will ever experience, the huge, sometimes brutal world of commercial tugging. We may admire the shape or the line of a classic tug from the shore or appreciate the tingle in the pads of our feet from the deep throbbing rumble of impossibly powerful engines, but the routine of daily life aboard is what E.V. Lambert vividly shares. In 1972, when she was just 13, her parents left the family farm in the hands of a tenant, bought the tug, Rose, a 1906 converted steamer and went into business hauling and pushing barges up and down the eastern seaboard. Six daughters rotated as crew, along with Zeke “a tent of yellow oil skins” and other assorted male crew. Debbie, alias Mom (later to become the first licensed female tugboat operator), the ship’s cat, Bilbo and the family dog, Toto filled out the team. Papa was very much the captain. Emily (E.V.) and Alison, her nearest sister in age shared duties for most of their teen years, working on the boat during the summers and (boarding) school vacations…”

      Everyone on board worked six hours on, six hours off. Emily’s watches were midnight to six and noon to six. Older sister, Suzannah was a more than acceptable cook, the two younger girls were deckhands and, boy, did they haul some hawsers. The tug became a popular fixture in her home waters, which may have inspired Papa to rename her the Babe. “We want to name ‘er something for us,” he explained, possibly tongue in cheek.

      The years of riding through storms that raised 8-foot seas in the open waters of the Chesapeake and through the fog and the ‘skeeters of the Ditch, became a treasure trove of family stories and they made a healthy living in the bargain. It isn’t hard to imagine how dull those off months at school must have been and the author gives them little space. (The reader wants to get back the boat as much as she does.) “Anticipating boarding school was like waiting for a ship’s wake to hit and with too much time to worry about it.” Besides, taking snuff and enjoying the end of watch beer was frowned upon at the Quaker school. The first book ends when Papa Lambert sells Babe. It’s a shock to the reader as well as the girls. We all want the adventure to go on forever. The Sequel, published two years later, resumes with a new, bigger and more powerful tug, a 1945 DPL class. The Nanticoke had many amenities especially appreciated by young women, like fans, private spaces and a roomy, modern galley--although the hawsers are even bigger and heavier. At this point in the voyage, author Emily is 16. The girls continued heave to with enthusiasm. Slightly older sister, Alison became the second licensed Able Bodied seawoman out of Norfolk. Mom was the first and Emily was the third.)

       

      All was not roses aboard the Nanticoke, however. An on-board accident that tore the skin off Emily’s hip and thigh laid her up in hospital for months. Though not referenced, it seems to have been the beginning of the end of the family’s tugging career. After recovering, the author went to nursing school and eventually Papa sold the boat-- claiming that he and Mama missed the farm. Emily tried another type of life on the water, signing on with an ocean going oil tanker, but found that the military-type hierarchy did not constitute family. As a writer, Lambert often startles the reader with the aptness of her similes, (she describes her arms as feeling like “old celery” after hauling a nettle-infested line) the keen-ness of her observations and the immediacy of her description. Her enthusiasm for life aboard is infectious. The books are written as if they happened yesterday complete with lively dialog that makes one wonder how she could remember or even imagine conversations that happened thirty years ago. But, I think Lambert was a writer before she was a tugboat crewmember."
      - Carol Standish, Maine Harbors, http://www.maineharbors.com/ - January 2009 Book Review

       

       

      ISBN: 0-9798008-1-1
      ISBN 13: 978-0-9798008-1-8

      Title:  Tugging On A Heartstring: The Sequel
      More True Adventures on a Family Tugboat on the Chesapeake Bay

      Author:  Emily V. Lambert

      Publisher: Marine Techniques Publishing, Augusta, Maine U.S.A.

      Format:  Paper – perfect bound

      Price:  $10.95

      Pages: 108
      Date Published: December 2008

      BISAC Audience:  Teens and Adults

      BISAC Subject:  Biography & Autobiography BIO000000

      Discount to Barnes & Noble:  25% to 55%

       

      Narrative:
      Tugging on a Heartstring: The Sequel is the true story of an all-American seagirl in the U.S. Merchant Marine. Barefoot and tobacco-dipping with long, blonde braids, Emily Lambert started working on tugs at age 13 in the 1970s. In this sequel to her exciting adventures, starting at age 16, Emily survives a violent deck injury and internal bleeding far from shore, achieves her Able Bodied Seaman's ticket, and sails deep-sea on a T-5 class tanker to decide, once and for all, between a life on land or on her beloved sea.

       

      About the Author:

      Emily Lambert worked for several more years on her family's next tug, a 1945 DPC class called the Nanticoke, and sailed two voyages on a T-5 tanker. While raising a family, she became a sportswriter in newspaper and a sports personality on television. She became the first woman sports columnist at her city paper. After winning two writing awards in her field, one national, she retired to write this book, and, to resume a college career interrupted by the winch wheel incident.

       

      Book Reviews:

      "Having spent almost 38 years on tugs I can tell you E.V. Lambert has brought the world of tug boating to life. She has done what most men dream of and succeeded where many men have failed. This book is hard to put down once you start reading."
      -Captain John Kinzel, Foss Maritime, Seattle, Washington

      "E.V. Lambert's tale of growing up on a working tugboat is a rollicking good read ... As a woman who broke into the maritime industry in 1976, I have always been interested to know who had gone before me."
      - Captain Jan Tiura, senior captain with Starlight Marine Services, San Francisco Bay www.phototiura.com

      "Immediately drawn in from the very first sentence by her vivid imagery, detailed and rich sensory descriptions, I found myself on board the Tug Babe...."
      - Captain Marcia Macone, Tug Stalwart, Crowley Maritime, Valdez, Alaska

       

      “Dear Emily,
      I ordered and received the Sequel from Amazon and couldn't put it down. The only bad thing about it was having it end. I truly enjoyed your two books more than I have enjoyed ANY books in a very long time. You made me laugh and you made me tear up as well. Your honesty is overwhelmingly rare. You must have the coolest parents and the greatest sisters in the world. Your parents have certainly lived what 99% of us can only dream about.

      Living in Nebraska my love of water has only extended to pleasure craft and canoes and kayaks. But I have always been an armchair "old salt". Both of my parents were in the Navy in World War 2 and I was born in 1947 at the Bainbridge Naval Station in Maryland. However, they moved to Nebr. upon being discharged when I was less than a year old.

      Again I want to thank you for sharing the wonderful and fascinating story of your teen years with your family in such an open and honest way.
      Very sincerely,
      Ron Hansen
      Omaha, Nebraska”

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