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Re: home preparedness/emergency prep guidelines- a question- some ramblings

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  • Vickilynn Haycraft
    Bob, I am sorry for your wife s condition and I pray she recovers quickly. You ask some good questions. As an EMT and paramedic, I can tell you that training
    Message 1 of 7 , Jul 3, 2012
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      Bob, 

      I am sorry for your wife's condition and I pray she recovers quickly.

      You ask some good questions. As an EMT and paramedic, I can tell you that training is not that easy, although there are some excellent "First Responder" courses out there that might be better. Also check into CERT classes.

      To the rest of your questions, you can only do your best, and trust G-d for the rest. Also, one person / family cannot do it all. That's where preparedness communities come in. More families that share their skills and resources make a bigger and better preparedness situation. I'd suggest families in your church that have similar beliefs and live close to you.

      --
      ~~In Messiah Yeshua,
      Vickilynn Haycraft,
      Real Food Living, Examiner.com, Get Real - Get Prepared radio show
      Micah 6:8
      http://www.realfoodliving.com
      http://www.blog.realfoodliving.com
      http://www.youtube.com/realfoodliving1
      http://www.examiner.com/housewares-in-national/vickilynn-haycraft
      http://www.examiner.com/family-preparedness-in-national/vickilynn-haycraft
      http://bepreparedradio.com/viewshow.aspx?id=c0af130d5faa4331a7e544946c279976
    • Bob Taylor
      thank you for your thoughts- i had pretty much arrived at that place already, but was interested in hearing what others felt on the topic. bob taylor
      Message 2 of 7 , Jul 3, 2012
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        thank you for your thoughts- i had pretty much arrived at that place already, but was interested in hearing what others felt on the topic.

        bob taylor

        On Jul 3, 2012, at 8:37 AM, Vickilynn Haycraft wrote:

         

        Bob, 


        I am sorry for your wife's condition and I pray she recovers quickly.

        You ask some good questions. As an EMT and paramedic, I can tell you that training is not that easy, although there are some excellent "First Responder" courses out there that might be better. Also check into CERT classes.

        To the rest of your questions, you can only do your best, and trust G-d for the rest. Also, one person / family cannot do it all. That's where preparedness communities come in. More families that share their skills and resources make a bigger and better preparedness situation. I'd suggest families in your church that have similar beliefs and live close to you.

        --
        ~~In Messiah Yeshua,
        Vickilynn Haycraft,
        Real Food Living, Examiner.com, Get Real - Get Prepared radio show
        Micah 6:8
        http://www.realfoodliving.com
        http://www.blog.realfoodliving.com
        http://www.youtube.com/realfoodliving1
        http://www.examiner.com/housewares-in-national/vickilynn-haycraft
        http://www.examiner.com/family-preparedness-in-national/vickilynn-haycraft
        http://bepreparedradio.com/viewshow.aspx?id=c0af130d5faa4331a7e544946c279976


      • Wayne Bingham
        Bob, So sorry to hear of your wife s condition. Your questions are all valid and are asked by nearly everyone (either consciously or subconsciously) who ever
        Message 3 of 7 , Jul 3, 2012
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          Bob,
           
          So sorry to hear of your wife's condition.
           
          Your questions are all valid and are asked by nearly everyone (either consciously or subconsciously) who ever thinks about preparedness. It does seem that the training needed, the actions to be taken and the assets needing to be acquired is endless. Neither I nor anyone else can provide the answer to the questions you raised...How much preparedness is enough? My answers probably won't meet you and your family's needs. However, perhaps I can offer some ideas to help you think through your questions to arrive at your own answers which may work for your family.
           
          I tend to think of preparedness activities in three areas...
          • Training -  Because we don't know exactly what will happen, nor when it will happen, we cannot prepare in a focused way for any particular disaster. We can however, prepare for the effects of nearly all disasters. As an example of what I mean... If a person breaks their leg from falling from a tree, our first aid actions would be the same as if the person breaks their leg during a tornado or if it occurs from type of an explosion. The same goes for other injuries. Prepare for the effects of disasters and don't spend so much focus on the nature of the disasters. I cannot emphasize the value of Vickylynn's suggestion to receive CERT (Community Emergency Response Team) training to include all adults and late teenagers in your household. While the word "team" is a part of the description, Please be assured that you are not required to be a member of any team unless you wish to. This training will provide the confidence needed to know what to do when disaster occurs.  This training is often times free, but does require you to attend 40 hours of training and is usually scheduled over several class periods to accommodate your time availability. There are tons of training opportunities available from Red Cross and others, and can be overwhelming. CERT is by far the best to prepare one for disasters. Two of the 8 sessions taught in CERT training are Disaster Medical 1 and 2. They are called disaster medical because you learn what is needed to help the most people in the shortest amount of time during a disaster. They do not teach about CPR, AED's and other medical related things which you are likely not going to be involved in during a disaster. Those additional trainings are useful in other areas of life, but will not be as likely in a disaster. CERT training covers how to quickly assess someone's medical condition rapidly, restore breathing, treat for all types of bleeding as well as shock. The central idea behind CERT is to prepare you to help yourself, your family and (if you wish) your neighbors until first responders can arrive for more advanced treatments. This training can be the life or death difference during a disaster. If you wish to learn more about CERT follow this link to FEMA where the training may be taken online (IS-317).   http://www.citizencorps.gov/cert/training_mat.shtm#IS317  At this link you may take the course online for free. If you take the course online, you will not receive the "certification" that you would receive if you attended a resident course in your community. This is because the local course offers "hands on" training in several areas. I have completed over 40 Red Cross and FEMA emergency management type classes and have found the CERT training to hit the nail square on the head for what someone can easily do and be very effective.
          • Mitigation - I did suggest earlier to not spend so much of your focus on the nature of the possible disasters. To clarify... I meant only when it comes to training and assets. Please spend some time looking at your geographic area to see what types of disasters your area is at risk for. Here in Missouri, I look at tornadoes, severe thunderstorms, flooding, excessive summer heat and ice storms during the winter. Yes, here, we should also look at earthquakes. Please don't overlook the possibly of an industrial accident which may require you to shelter-in-place or perhaps evacuate. Once identified, you can easily have measures in place to minimize the effects the disaster has on you and your family. In this area, the phrase "an ounce of prevention is worth more than a pound of cure". Be ready to keep safe!
          • Assets - The list of needed assets is endless and comes down to what you personally feel you are preparing for. I'll say now that no matter how many assets you have on hand, you will probably still be surprised at what you forgot when disaster occurs. We all have financial limits. I have seen lists everywhere saying "have this" or "buy that". I would never offer a list to anyone except as a starting point to aid their thought processes. Find such a list, then look at what you anticipate and then add to or take away items. Emergency preparedness is really a journey. Your assets will evolve as time goes on. I have found through the years that the contents of my 72 hour kit changed after I attended a "72 hour go-kit" exercise twice. I found that some items were not justified and a better solution should be sought. Food storage is another area where your ideas may change over time. We started by acquiring lots of #10 cans of wheat and bulk purchases of many other items. In our experience we learned that for us, that was a prescription for spending lots of money, throwing away lots of food and still not being prepared when the time comes. . We have evolved to a method of conducting food storage that includes some #10 cans of some foods, but primarily consists of those items we use regularly in our "normal" circumstances. We just purchase some extras every once in a while to increase the food storage. We plan our meals and use our food storage area to supply our kitchen pantry. Then when we go to the grocery store, we develop a list of items needed for the next weeks meal plan and also items needed to replace the items taken out of our food storage that week. The end result is no waste of money or food. As a bonus we have the assurance that the food we have will be eaten and enjoyed when disaster occurs. This works for us but may not work for others. I mentioned it so you can have another idea that might work for you and your family.
          Preparedness is as individual as your haircut. One style does not fit all. At some point, we all must recognize that our preparations are adequate as we understand things. I truly believe if you organize your planning, preparedness can be done without being overwhelming. And please also remember that you can do only what you can do and should recognize that you likely will not think of or be prepared for everything. If you forget something, don't beat yourself up. Live and learn and do what you can. If you are like me, you will never ne able to say "I am fully prepared".
           
          Wayne
        • Janet Bay
          I think Wayne has addressed these issues very nicely. When we come face to face with issues in our family such as your wife is experiencing, we can t help but
          Message 4 of 7 , Jul 3, 2012
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            I think Wayne has addressed these issues very nicely.  When we come face to face with issues in our family such as your wife is experiencing, we can't help but question if we should be working harder at preparing in a particular area.  Certainly, I am guilty of this wanting to hop from one facet to another as I see or read of various situations.  For me, it is necessary for me remember two things 1) we aren't to run faster than we strength to do (my translation - we aren't supposed to accumulate and/or train faster than it is reasonable for each of us in our personal situations) and 2) regardless of where I am in my preparations, as long as I've been diligent in striving to do my best; the Lord will meet me where I am in any need.  
             
            My prayers are with you and your wife as you meet this challenge.
             
            Janet


             

            To: TotallyReady@yahoogroups.com
            From: wbmo@...
            Date: Tue, 3 Jul 2012 15:00:25 -0500
            Subject: [TotallyReady] Re: home preparedness/emergency prep guidelines- a question- some ramblings

             
            Bob,
             
            So sorry to hear of your wife's condition.
             
            Your questions are all valid and are asked by nearly everyone (either consciously or subconsciously) who ever thinks about preparedness. It does seem that the training needed, the actions to be taken and the assets needing to be acquired is endless. Neither I nor anyone else can provide the answer to the questions you raised...How much preparedness is enough? My answers probably won't meet you and your family's needs. However, perhaps I can offer some ideas to help you think through your questions to arrive at your own answers which may work for your family.
             
            I tend to think of preparedness activities in three areas...
            • Training -  Because we don't know exactly what will happen, nor when it will happen, we cannot prepare in a focused way for any particular disaster. We can however, prepare for the effects of nearly all disasters. As an example of what I mean... If a person breaks their leg from falling from a tree, our first aid actions would be the same as if the person breaks their leg during a tornado or if it occurs from type of an explosion. The same goes for other injuries. Prepare for the effects of disasters and don't spend so much focus on the nature of the disasters. I cannot emphasize the value of Vickylynn's suggestion to receive CERT (Community Emergency Response Team) training to include all adults and late teenagers in your household. While the word "team" is a part of the description, Please be assured that you are not required to be a member of any team unless you wish to. This training will provide the confidence needed to know what to do when disaster occurs.  This training is often times free, but does require you to attend 40 hours of training and is usually scheduled over several class periods to accommodate your time availability. There are tons of training opportunities available from Red Cross and others, and can be overwhelming. CERT is by far the best to prepare one for disasters. Two of the 8 sessions taught in CERT training are Disaster Medical 1 and 2. They are called disaster medical because you learn what is needed to help the most people in the shortest amount of time during a disaster. They do not teach about CPR, AED's and other medical related things which you are likely not going to be involved in during a disaster. Those additional trainings are useful in other areas of life, but will not be as likely in a disaster. CERT training covers how to quickly assess someone's medical condition rapidly, restore breathing, treat for all types of bleeding as well as shock. The central idea behind CERT is to prepare you to help yourself, your family and (if you wish) your neighbors until first responders can arrive for more advanced treatments. This training can be the life or death difference during a disaster. If you wish to learn more about CERT follow this link to FEMA where the training may be taken online (IS-317).   http://www.citizencorps.gov/cert/training_mat.shtm#IS317  At this link you may take the course online for free. If you take the course online, you will not receive the "certification" that you would receive if you attended a resident course in your community. This is because the local course offers "hands on" training in several areas. I have completed over 40 Red Cross and FEMA emergency management type classes and have found the CERT training to hit the nail square on the head for what someone can easily do and be very effective.
            • Mitigation - I did suggest earlier to not spend so much of your focus on the nature of the possible disasters. To clarify... I meant only when it comes to training and assets. Please spend some time looking at your geographic area to see what types of disasters your area is at risk for. Here in Missouri, I look at tornadoes, severe thunderstorms, flooding, excessive summer heat and ice storms during the winter. Yes, here, we should also look at earthquakes. Please don't overlook the possibly of an industrial accident which may require you to shelter-in-place or perhaps evacuate. Once identified, you can easily have measures in place to minimize the effects the disaster has on you and your family. In this area, the phrase "an ounce of prevention is worth more than a pound of cure". Be ready to keep safe!
            • Assets - The list of needed assets is endless and comes down to what you personally feel you are preparing for. I'll say now that no matter how many assets you have on hand, you will probably still be surprised at what you forgot when disaster occurs. We all have financial limits. I have seen lists everywhere saying "have this" or "buy that". I would never offer a list to anyone except as a starting point to aid their thought processes. Find such a list, then look at what you anticipate and then add to or take away items. Emergency preparedness is really a journey. Your assets will evolve as time goes on. I have found through the years that the contents of my 72 hour kit changed after I attended a "72 hour go-kit" exercise twice. I found that some items were not justified and a better solution should be sought. Food storage is another area where your ideas may change over time. We started by acquiring lots of #10 cans of wheat and bulk purchases of many other items. In our experience we learned that for us, that was a prescription for spending lots of money, throwing away lots of food and still not being prepared when the time comes. . We have evolved to a method of conducting food storage that includes some #10 cans of some foods, but primarily consists of those items we use regularly in our "normal" circumstances. We just purchase some extras every once in a while to increase the food storage. We plan our meals and use our food storage area to supply our kitchen pantry. Then when we go to the grocery store, we develop a list of items needed for the next weeks meal plan and also items needed to replace the items taken out of our food storage that week. The end result is no waste of money or food. As a bonus we have the assurance that the food we have will be eaten and enjoyed when disaster occurs. This works for us but may not work for others. I mentioned it so you can have another idea that might work for you and your family.
            Preparedness is as individual as your haircut. One style does not fit all. At some point, we all must recognize that our preparations are adequate as we understand things. I truly believe if you organize your planning, preparedness can be done without being overwhelming. And please also remember that you can do only what you can do and should recognize that you likely will not think of or be prepared for everything. If you forget something, don't beat yourself up. Live and learn and do what you can. If you are like me, you will never ne able to say "I am fully prepared".
             
            Wayne


          • Castlemum
            Hi Wayne, Your last name is the same as mine use to be, except his last name didn t have an N. I really appreciated your post as to what to accomplish and how
            Message 5 of 7 , Jul 12, 2012
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              Hi Wayne,

              Your last name is the same as mine use to be, except his last name didn't have an N.

              I really appreciated your post as to what to accomplish and how much. I have been fretting about how few preps I do have. I started prepping a few months ago, but have yet to have a year or even 3 months worth of food on hand. I can only afford a months worth at a time and that runs out. I appreciate the fact that you mentioned that it is really up to the individual person or family as to how much or what is needed. Now I don't have to feel bad in the fact that I am not as far along as many others are. I do what I can with what I get. Your posting gives me encouragement to keep at it. I thank you.

              Tina


              --- In TotallyReady@yahoogroups.com, "Wayne Bingham" <wbmo@...> wrote:
              >
              > Bob,
              >
              > So sorry to hear of your wife's condition.
              >
              > Your questions are all valid and are asked by nearly everyone (either
              > consciously or subconsciously) who ever thinks about preparedness. It does
              > seem that the training needed, the actions to be taken and the assets
              > needing to be acquired is endless. Neither I nor anyone else can provide the
              > answer to the questions you raised...How much preparedness is enough? My
              > answers probably won't meet you and your family's needs. However, perhaps I
              > can offer some ideas to help you think through your questions to arrive at
              > your own answers which may work for your family.
              >
              > I tend to think of preparedness activities in three areas...
              >
              > * Training - Because we don't know exactly what will happen, nor when
              > it will happen, we cannot prepare in a focused way for any particular
              > disaster. We can however, prepare for the effects of nearly all disasters.
              > As an example of what I mean... If a person breaks their leg from falling
              > from a tree, our first aid actions would be the same as if the person breaks
              > their leg during a tornado or if it occurs from type of an explosion. The
              > same goes for other injuries. Prepare for the effects of disasters and don't
              > spend so much focus on the nature of the disasters. I cannot emphasize the
              > value of Vickylynn's suggestion to receive CERT (Community Emergency
              > Response Team) training to include all adults and late teenagers in your
              > household. While the word "team" is a part of the description, Please be
              > assured that you are not required to be a member of any team unless you wish
              > to. This training will provide the confidence needed to know what to do when
              > disaster occurs. This training is often times free, but does require you to
              > attend 40 hours of training and is usually scheduled over several class
              > periods to accommodate your time availability. There are tons of training
              > opportunities available from Red Cross and others, and can be overwhelming.
              > CERT is by far the best to prepare one for disasters. Two of the 8 sessions
              > taught in CERT training are Disaster Medical 1 and 2. They are called
              > disaster medical because you learn what is needed to help the most people in
              > the shortest amount of time during a disaster. They do not teach about CPR,
              > AED's and other medical related things which you are likely not going to be
              > involved in during a disaster. Those additional trainings are useful in
              > other areas of life, but will not be as likely in a disaster. CERT training
              > covers how to quickly assess someone's medical condition rapidly, restore
              > breathing, treat for all types of bleeding as well as shock. The central
              > idea behind CERT is to prepare you to help yourself, your family and (if you
              > wish) your neighbors until first responders can arrive for more advanced
              > treatments. This training can be the life or death difference during a
              > disaster. If you wish to learn more about CERT follow this link to FEMA
              > where the training may be taken online (IS-317).
              > http://www.citizencorps.gov/cert/training_mat.shtm#IS317 At this link you
              > may take the course online for free. If you take the course online, you will
              > not receive the "certification" that you would receive if you attended a
              > resident course in your community. This is because the local course offers
              > "hands on" training in several areas. I have completed over 40 Red Cross and
              > FEMA emergency management type classes and have found the CERT training to
              > hit the nail square on the head for what someone can easily do and be very
              > effective.
              >
              > * Mitigation - I did suggest earlier to not spend so much of your
              > focus on the nature of the possible disasters. To clarify... I meant only
              > when it comes to training and assets. Please spend some time looking at your
              > geographic area to see what types of disasters your area is at risk for.
              > Here in Missouri, I look at tornadoes, severe thunderstorms, flooding,
              > excessive summer heat and ice storms during the winter. Yes, here, we should
              > also look at earthquakes. Please don't overlook the possibly of an
              > industrial accident which may require you to shelter-in-place or perhaps
              > evacuate. Once identified, you can easily have measures in place to minimize
              > the effects the disaster has on you and your family. In this area, the
              > phrase "an ounce of prevention is worth more than a pound of cure". Be ready
              > to keep safe!
              >
              > * Assets - The list of needed assets is endless and comes down to what
              > you personally feel you are preparing for. I'll say now that no matter how
              > many assets you have on hand, you will probably still be surprised at what
              > you forgot when disaster occurs. We all have financial limits. I have seen
              > lists everywhere saying "have this" or "buy that". I would never offer a
              > list to anyone except as a starting point to aid their thought processes.
              > Find such a list, then look at what you anticipate and then add to or take
              > away items. Emergency preparedness is really a journey. Your assets will
              > evolve as time goes on. I have found through the years that the contents of
              > my 72 hour kit changed after I attended a "72 hour go-kit" exercise twice. I
              > found that some items were not justified and a better solution should be
              > sought. Food storage is another area where your ideas may change over time.
              > We started by acquiring lots of #10 cans of wheat and bulk purchases of many
              > other items. In our experience we learned that for us, that was a
              > prescription for spending lots of money, throwing away lots of food and
              > still not being prepared when the time comes. . We have evolved to a method
              > of conducting food storage that includes some #10 cans of some foods, but
              > primarily consists of those items we use regularly in our "normal"
              > circumstances. We just purchase some extras every once in a while to
              > increase the food storage. We plan our meals and use our food storage area
              > to supply our kitchen pantry. Then when we go to the grocery store, we
              > develop a list of items needed for the next weeks meal plan and also items
              > needed to replace the items taken out of our food storage that week. The end
              > result is no waste of money or food. As a bonus we have the assurance that
              > the food we have will be eaten and enjoyed when disaster occurs. This works
              > for us but may not work for others. I mentioned it so you can have another
              > idea that might work for you and your family.
              >
              > Preparedness is as individual as your haircut. One style does not fit all.
              > At some point, we all must recognize that our preparations are adequate as
              > we understand things. I truly believe if you organize your planning,
              > preparedness can be done without being overwhelming. And please also
              > remember that you can do only what you can do and should recognize that you
              > likely will not think of or be prepared for everything. If you forget
              > something, don't beat yourself up. Live and learn and do what you can. If
              > you are like me, you will never ne able to say "I am fully prepared".
              >
              > Wayne
              >
            • karen_isaacson
              RE: CERT I think that CERT is a good basic starting point, but it will not replace first aid training and should be supplemented by additional, more advanced
              Message 6 of 7 , Jul 13, 2012
              • 0 Attachment
                RE: CERT I think that CERT is a good basic starting point, but it will not replace first aid training and should be supplemented by additional, more advanced training as well as first aid classes. I found the classes OK as far as they went, but the first aid part was kind of – not lame, but since it was my first exposure to first aid, kind of incomplete. I'd recommend taking some first aid before you take a CERT course.

                RE: mitigation: Up here in the Pacific NW, that's windstorms, snow, earthquakes and floods, mostly. I don't think we've ever had either a hurricane or typhoon and we don't get tornadoes. So, we prepare accordingly.

                RE: assets: this is where you have to stop and ask yourself `what do I really eat?' and plan accordingly. We haven't done a lot of commercially prepared #10 cans or the like because of their cost, but I have a lot of home vacuum-packed items. I like to keep the freezer full (generator will power that) and plan meals around what I pull out of it, and try to work in as much as I can of what's in the pantry to rotate the stuff, replacing as I go.

                I look at the ads and shop specials at seven different stores (not all are grocery stores, but no, I don't buy food at dollar stores, and I don't drive a long distance to save pennies what with the cost of gas; has to be worthwhile to go) and Costco. Costco's good for things like tomato sauce and flour and rice, but you don't have to buy bulk at Costco to get a good deal if you watch the ads AND look for the items you have on your list of things to stock up on while in the store because not everything makes it into the sale flyer.

                As far as other things we might need, most of what things I've acquired as been to replace something that won't work in an emergency, like a bucket potty to replace the toilet. I look around and ask myself 'how would I wash dishes? Do laundry? Take a shower?' and go from there to fill in the parts that will have to be manual and not automatic like they are now...

                Karen
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