Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

feeding in a tbh

Expand Messages
  • kmdaven
    Hi, I have two TBHs I started with nucs (3 bars) last May (late May). it wasn t a great honey year, I hear from other beekeepers, and my two TBHs ended up with
    Message 1 of 10 , Nov 20, 2007
      Hi, I have two TBHs I started with nucs (3 bars) last May (late May).
      it wasn't a great honey year, I hear from other beekeepers, and my two
      TBHs ended up with 11 and 12 bars, respectively, of drawn comb and
      honey, as of first killing frost around Oct. 1. They are still at that
      stage-- I checked today, both have about the same amount of honey. I
      have no idea why their stores aren't dropping. But anyway, I am still
      assuming somewhat I might have to feed them but I cna't quite figure
      out the logistics of feeding in a TBH. I have one Lang that is easy- I
      fed a quart of sugar water upside down on the inside cover (drip drip
      drip). I have some crystallized honey now- if I need to feed my TBHs,
      should I just somehow put it on the floor of the TBH near where
      the "cluster" is, or w hat?

      also, when is it OK to open a hive in the winter? Must I wait for a
      calm, wind-free , warm day?

      thanks,
      kristen
    • Gary
      Hi Kristene, You probably will not see a big drop in stores yet. They will probably make it through winter on that many bars, there are many factors that will
      Message 2 of 10 , Nov 21, 2007
        Hi Kristene,

        You probably will not see a big drop in stores yet. They will
        probably make it through winter on that many bars, there are many
        factors that will influence the out come in particular the size of
        the comb (volume of your hive). The greatest problem you can predict
        is the fact they probably do not have enough stores to make it
        through early spring! When temps warm up and brood rearing kicks
        into high gear they will go through whatever they have left very
        fast. This time of the year is when most colonies are lost to
        starvation.
        Feeding in a TBH is actually easier than in any other hive IMHO. You
        will need a food source that can stand up to winter I recommend
        fondant. Just place a piece of wax paper on the bottom of the hive
        right behind the last comb and put a two lb chunk on it. Close up
        the hive and do not open it until you see bees flying in the spring.
        The fondant will serve two needs, if they are able to break cluster
        during the winter it will be there for them to eat/store and it will
        be there in the spring when they need it most. The colony will build
        up strong very fast. The other way to feed in a TBH is to use the
        Baggie feeder method just google it there are a hundred sets of
        instructions on the web.
        If you need to know if they are there during the winter put your ear
        close to the side and knock once firmly on the side you should hear
        a buzzing roar. Otherwise it is never to open the hive while the
        bees are in a winter cluster.
      • kmdaven
        Thank you Gary this is all very good information. Where do I get this fondant ? ... predict ... You ... spring. ... will ... build ... ear
        Message 3 of 10 , Nov 21, 2007
          Thank you Gary this is all very good information. Where do I get
          this "fondant"?


          --- In TopHive@yahoogroups.com, "Gary" <nicty95@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi Kristene,
          >
          > You probably will not see a big drop in stores yet. They will
          > probably make it through winter on that many bars, there are many
          > factors that will influence the out come in particular the size of
          > the comb (volume of your hive). The greatest problem you can
          predict
          > is the fact they probably do not have enough stores to make it
          > through early spring! When temps warm up and brood rearing kicks
          > into high gear they will go through whatever they have left very
          > fast. This time of the year is when most colonies are lost to
          > starvation.
          > Feeding in a TBH is actually easier than in any other hive IMHO.
          You
          > will need a food source that can stand up to winter I recommend
          > fondant. Just place a piece of wax paper on the bottom of the hive
          > right behind the last comb and put a two lb chunk on it. Close up
          > the hive and do not open it until you see bees flying in the
          spring.
          > The fondant will serve two needs, if they are able to break cluster
          > during the winter it will be there for them to eat/store and it
          will
          > be there in the spring when they need it most. The colony will
          build
          > up strong very fast. The other way to feed in a TBH is to use the
          > Baggie feeder method just google it there are a hundred sets of
          > instructions on the web.
          > If you need to know if they are there during the winter put your
          ear
          > close to the side and knock once firmly on the side you should hear
          > a buzzing roar. Otherwise it is never to open the hive while the
          > bees are in a winter cluster.
          >
        • Gary
          Here in Germany I found it at a local feed store. You can check with a local beek or on line bee supply stores. If you still cannot find a source to purchase
          Message 4 of 10 , Nov 21, 2007
            Here in Germany I found it at a local feed store. You can check with a
            local beek or on line bee supply stores. If you still cannot find a
            source to purchase it recipes ot make it or no the web just google "Bee
            fondant" sometimes it is called candy.
          • JIm & Rebecca Payne
            Listen to Gary n this one. At another place in a book or mag I read also that a mix of sugar, powdered milk and yeast can be used with Cocconut oil as a
            Message 5 of 10 , Nov 22, 2007
              Listen to Gary n this one. At another place in a book or mag I read also that a mix of sugar, powdered milk and yeast can be used with Cocconut oil as a binder. Or without the oil and just left in a feeder tray
              The yeast shouldbe brewers yeast and ground to small granules.
              I am sure Gary has a recipe and I just thought this one would make a nice addition.
              Jim Payne
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: kmdaven
              To: TopHive@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Wednesday, November 21, 2007 2:27 PM
              Subject: [TopHive] Re: feeding in a tbh



              Thank you Gary this is all very good information. Where do I get
              this "fondant"?


              --- In TopHive@yahoogroups.com, "Gary" <nicty95@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hi Kristene,
              >
              > You probably will not see a big drop in stores yet. They will
              > probably make it through winter on that many bars, there are many
              > factors that will influence the out come in particular the size of
              > the comb (volume of your hive). The greatest problem you can
              predict
              > is the fact they probably do not have enough stores to make it
              > through early spring! When temps warm up and brood rearing kicks
              > into high gear they will go through whatever they have left very
              > fast. This time of the year is when most colonies are lost to
              > starvation.
              > Feeding in a TBH is actually easier than in any other hive IMHO.
              You
              > will need a food source that can stand up to winter I recommend
              > fondant. Just place a piece of wax paper on the bottom of the hive
              > right behind the last comb and put a two lb chunk on it. Close up
              > the hive and do not open it until you see bees flying in the
              spring.
              > The fondant will serve two needs, if they are able to break cluster
              > during the winter it will be there for them to eat/store and it
              will
              > be there in the spring when they need it most. The colony will
              build
              > up strong very fast. The other way to feed in a TBH is to use the
              > Baggie feeder method just google it there are a hundred sets of
              > instructions on the web.
              > If you need to know if they are there during the winter put your
              ear
              > close to the side and knock once firmly on the side you should hear
              > a buzzing roar. Otherwise it is never to open the hive while the
              > bees are in a winter cluster.
              >




              The group archive and other pages can be accessed at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TopHive

              Yahoo! Groups Links




              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • JIm & Rebecca Payne
              You can also make a candy board which is a panel with raise edged molding laid flat and the liquid is pored into it where it is allowed to harden then the
              Message 6 of 10 , Nov 22, 2007
                You can also make a candy board which is a panel with raise edged molding laid flat and the liquid is pored into it where it is allowed to harden then the candy board is placed in the hive as needed. It also stores well

                Jim Payne
                ----- Original Message -----
                From: Gary
                To: TopHive@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Thursday, November 22, 2007 1:10 AM
                Subject: [TopHive] Re: feeding in a tbh


                Here in Germany I found it at a local feed store. You can check with a
                local beek or on line bee supply stores. If you still cannot find a
                source to purchase it recipes ot make it or no the web just google "Bee
                fondant" sometimes it is called candy.



                The group archive and other pages can be accessed at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TopHive

                Yahoo! Groups Links




                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Gary
                Here is a great example of feeding fondant http://www.stratford-upon-avon.freeserve.co.uk/PENotes/Fondant.htm In a top bar hive there are two ways to feed.
                Message 7 of 10 , Nov 22, 2007
                  Here is a great example of feeding fondant
                  http://www.stratford-upon-avon.freeserve.co.uk/PENotes/Fondant.htm

                  In a top bar hive there are two ways to feed. Either you just put a
                  huge piece on some waxed paper on the floor of the hive or you can
                  build artificial comb from a top bar and #8 hardware wire. You simply
                  make a comb shape from the wire attach it to the TB and stuff it with
                  fondant and hang it in the hive fro the bees to move onto. There has
                  been talk of problems with the fondant drying out, I did not
                  experience any problems and I used the first method. The best thing
                  about using this method is there will be a food source in the hive as
                  soon as they need it in the spring, you really only have to peak in
                  in Jan or Feb just to insure there is still some left, if not (which
                  is rare) just throw another chunk in and wait until they are flying.
                  Less intrusive, labor intensive and stressful on the colony!

                  There is a thread on the topic now here:
                  http://www.biobees.com/forum/viewtopic.php?t=143

                  Gary
                  www.hirschbachapiary.com
                • Phil Chandler
                  ... also that a mix of sugar, powdered milk and yeast can be used with Cocconut oil as a binder. Or without the oil and just left in a feeder tray ... nice
                  Message 8 of 10 , Nov 23, 2007
                    --- In TopHive@yahoogroups.com, "JIm & Rebecca Payne"
                    <jimandrebeccan@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Listen to Gary n this one. At another place in a book or mag I read
                    also that a mix of sugar, powdered milk and yeast can be used with
                    Cocconut oil as a binder. Or without the oil and just left in a feeder
                    tray
                    > The yeast shouldbe brewers yeast and ground to small granules.
                    > I am sure Gary has a recipe and I just thought this one would make a
                    nice addition.
                    > Jim Payne

                    I would be very careful of using such recipes, which seem to be
                    founded more on superstition than rational observations of bee
                    behaviour and nutrition.

                    Since when did bees eat milk powder, yeast or coconut oil? Even sugar
                    should give us concern: Natural beekeepers prefer to give only honey
                    where possible and everything else should be regarded as suspect until
                    proven innocent, IMO.

                    Phil Chandler
                    www.biobees.com
                  • JIm & Rebecca Payne
                    The guy with the recipe is a well known bee keeper in CA who sold out his artifical semination operation who had previusly done much research. I have to find
                    Message 9 of 10 , Nov 23, 2007
                      The guy with the recipe is a well known bee keeper in CA who sold out his artifical semination operation who had previusly done much research. I have to find the magizine from back in the 80's in American Bee Journal.

                      Jim Payne


                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: Phil Chandler
                      To: TopHive@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Friday, November 23, 2007 8:02 AM
                      Subject: [TopHive] Re: feeding in a tbh


                      --- In TopHive@yahoogroups.com, "JIm & Rebecca Payne"
                      <jimandrebeccan@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > Listen to Gary n this one. At another place in a book or mag I read
                      also that a mix of sugar, powdered milk and yeast can be used with
                      Cocconut oil as a binder. Or without the oil and just left in a feeder
                      tray
                      > The yeast shouldbe brewers yeast and ground to small granules.
                      > I am sure Gary has a recipe and I just thought this one would make a
                      nice addition.
                      > Jim Payne

                      I would be very careful of using such recipes, which seem to be
                      founded more on superstition than rational observations of bee
                      behaviour and nutrition.

                      Since when did bees eat milk powder, yeast or coconut oil? Even sugar
                      should give us concern: Natural beekeepers prefer to give only honey
                      where possible and everything else should be regarded as suspect until
                      proven innocent, IMO.

                      Phil Chandler
                      www.biobees.com







                      The group archive and other pages can be accessed at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TopHive

                      Yahoo! Groups Links




                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Gary
                      I have to agree with Phil on this one. Bakers fondant is made from powdered sugar and glucose, then heated to a soft paste like consistency. anything else can
                      Message 10 of 10 , Nov 24, 2007
                        I have to agree with Phil on this one. Bakers fondant is made from
                        powdered sugar and glucose, then heated to a soft paste like
                        consistency. anything else can be compared to someone's mom's home
                        remedy.

                        Gary
                        www.hirschbachapiary.com
                      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.