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Re: New-bee hive question (Update)

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  • Marty Hardison
    Betsie, I m sorry my advise hurt more than helped. It is sometimes very hard to get one s first hive started right. New comb is very hard to deal with. Also,
    Message 1 of 11 , Jun 2, 2007
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      Betsie,
      I'm sorry my advise hurt more than helped. It is sometimes very hard
      to get one's first hive started right. New comb is very hard to deal
      with. Also, some bees are very squirrely comb builders. I have left
      bad combing in place for as much as a couple of seasons in order to
      save the brood. But I keep trying to get the combs on track by
      placing my best comb in the back of the combs that the bees have
      already built. That encourages the bees to build the next comb
      straight and so on. Eventually you can excise the badly built comb
      during spring cleaning.

      Have you considered inserting a "follower board" in the hive? This
      is just a hanging hive shaped piece of board (I've used masonite)
      that hangs like a topbar comb. the bar it hangs from only allows halv
      a bee space on either side. This follower board can be moved back as
      the combs next to it are built straight.

      I also remember dropping the queen on the ground and panicking when
      discovering her. Each time that happened the queen survived. May
      yours do so as well.

      The season is young. May yours turn out well.

      Marty

      --- In TopHive@yahoogroups.com, Betsie <beatrixspinster@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > Sarah, your description made perfect sense! I wish I
      > had thought of that myself. Thank you for the
      > suggestion =)
      >
      > Tom, Thank you for empathy and understanding... I am
      > hoping that mine will recover as well. They sure do
      > seem busy and committed. Keep me updated on the
      > progress of your hive. =)
      >
      > ~ Betsie (in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan)
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      ______________________________________________________________________
      ______________Got a little couch potato?
      > Check out fun summer activities for kids.
      > http://search.yahoo.com/search?
      fr=oni_on_mail&p=summer+activities+for+kids&cs=bz
      >
    • GEORGE McCAMMON
      Dear Marty, I must thank you for your input on issues of Top Bar Hives especially, Queen Breeding which I would like you to send me a copy and possibly, the
      Message 2 of 11 , Jun 2, 2007
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        Dear Marty,

        I must thank you for your input on issues of Top Bar Hives especially, Queen Breeding which I would like you to send me a copy and possibly, the latest developments in this area.

        I have been facinated by the Africanized bees and see them as THE BEES in Guyana, where I live. I have tried the KTBH and have been quite successful on an amateur basis. Now I am going commercial with my new hive on my newly acquired 72 acre plot which would be called, GUYANA SHIELD HONEY BEE RESEARCH INSTITUTE.

        Please let me hear from you soon.

        Regards

        George E.McCammon

        Marty Hardison <topbarbeehives@...> wrote:
        Betsie,
        I'm sorry my advise hurt more than helped. It is sometimes very hard
        to get one's first hive started right. New comb is very hard to deal
        with. Also, some bees are very squirrely comb builders. I have left
        bad combing in place for as much as a couple of seasons in order to
        save the brood. But I keep trying to get the combs on track by
        placing my best comb in the back of the combs that the bees have
        already built. That encourages the bees to build the next comb
        straight and so on. Eventually you can excise the badly built comb
        during spring cleaning.

        Have you considered inserting a "follower board" in the hive? This
        is just a hanging hive shaped piece of board (I've used masonite)
        that hangs like a topbar comb. the bar it hangs from only allows halv
        a bee space on either side. This follower board can be moved back as
        the combs next to it are built straight.

        I also remember dropping the queen on the ground and panicking when
        discovering her. Each time that happened the queen survived. May
        yours do so as well.

        The season is young. May yours turn out well.

        Marty

        --- In TopHive@yahoogroups.com, Betsie <beatrixspinster@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > Sarah, your description made perfect sense! I wish I
        > had thought of that myself. Thank you for the
        > suggestion =)
        >
        > Tom, Thank you for empathy and understanding... I am
        > hoping that mine will recover as well. They sure do
        > seem busy and committed. Keep me updated on the
        > progress of your hive. =)
        >
        > ~ Betsie (in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan)
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        __________________________________________________________
        ______________Got a little couch potato?
        > Check out fun summer activities for kids.
        > http://search.yahoo.com/search?
        fr=oni_on_mail&p=summer+activities+for+kids&cs=bz
        >






        ---------------------------------
        Pinpoint customers who are looking for what you sell.

        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Marty Hardison
        George, I have one article on queen rearing in topbar hives. I scanned a copy and posted it in the photos but since we can only post jpg photos the type was
        Message 3 of 11 , Jun 11, 2007
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          George,
          I have one article on queen rearing in topbar hives. I scanned a
          copy and posted it in the photos but since we can only post jpg
          photos the type was not clear. I removed it from the photo section.
          If you will send me your e-mail address I can attach a pdf of the
          same article.

          Marty
          --- In TopHive@yahoogroups.com, GEORGE McCAMMON <eughton@...> wrote:
          >
          > Dear Marty,
          >
          > I must thank you for your input on issues of Top Bar Hives
          especially, Queen Breeding which I would like you to send me a copy
          and possibly, the latest developments in this area.
          >
          > I have been facinated by the Africanized bees and see them as
          THE BEES in Guyana, where I live. I have tried the KTBH and have
          been quite successful on an amateur basis. Now I am going commercial
          with my new hive on my newly acquired 72 acre plot which would be
          called, GUYANA SHIELD HONEY BEE RESEARCH INSTITUTE.
          >
          > Please let me hear from you soon.
          >
          > Regards
          >
          > George E.McCammon
          >
          > Marty Hardison <topbarbeehives@...> wrote:
          > Betsie,
          > I'm sorry my advise hurt more than helped. It is sometimes very
          hard
          > to get one's first hive started right. New comb is very hard to
          deal
          > with. Also, some bees are very squirrely comb builders. I have
          left
          > bad combing in place for as much as a couple of seasons in order
          to
          > save the brood. But I keep trying to get the combs on track by
          > placing my best comb in the back of the combs that the bees have
          > already built. That encourages the bees to build the next comb
          > straight and so on. Eventually you can excise the badly built comb
          > during spring cleaning.
          >
          > Have you considered inserting a "follower board" in the hive? This
          > is just a hanging hive shaped piece of board (I've used masonite)
          > that hangs like a topbar comb. the bar it hangs from only allows
          halv
          > a bee space on either side. This follower board can be moved back
          as
          > the combs next to it are built straight.
          >
          > I also remember dropping the queen on the ground and panicking
          when
          > discovering her. Each time that happened the queen survived. May
          > yours do so as well.
          >
          > The season is young. May yours turn out well.
          >
          > Marty
          >
          > --- In TopHive@yahoogroups.com, Betsie <beatrixspinster@> wrote:
          > >
          > >
          > > Sarah, your description made perfect sense! I wish I
          > > had thought of that myself. Thank you for the
          > > suggestion =)
          > >
          > > Tom, Thank you for empathy and understanding... I am
          > > hoping that mine will recover as well. They sure do
          > > seem busy and committed. Keep me updated on the
          > > progress of your hive. =)
          > >
          > > ~ Betsie (in the Upper Peninsula of Michigan)
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > __________________________________________________________
          > ______________Got a little couch potato?
          > > Check out fun summer activities for kids.
          > > http://search.yahoo.com/search?
          > fr=oni_on_mail&p=summer+activities+for+kids&cs=bz
          > >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > ---------------------------------
          > Pinpoint customers who are looking for what you sell.
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
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