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TBH decimated by SHB

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  • theseventhsamuri
    My oldest and strongest hive has been nearly destroyed by the small hive beetle. Going into winter the hive was very strong with plenty of stores and it was
    Message 1 of 3 , Apr 30, 2007
      My oldest and strongest hive has been nearly destroyed by the small
      hive beetle. Going into winter the hive was very strong with plenty of
      stores and it was during my last check for the season I spotted a beetle.

      Upon the spring check I found 2/3rds of the bees dead with beetles and
      beetle larva among the piles of dead bees on the floor. Amazingly, the
      remaining bees are bringing in pollen, I found capped brood and also
      found the queen alive and well. They are only using a small area of
      undamaged comb near the top.

      In desperation I cut out nearly all of the damaged comb, scraped the
      bottom board clean and removed excess honey stores. I added some nice
      empty white combs from my other (uneffected) hive into the brood nest
      and put a full bar of capped honey on each end.

      I'm in NW Lower Michigan surrounded by commerical orchards. The
      hunderds of hives they use for pollination services are moved to
      Florida and back and I suspect this is where the SHB came from.
      Regardless of the source I need to take action to protect my other
      hives and hopefully save the one that is affected.

      I hate the thought of using chemicals but will do what ever it takes.
      Anybody with experience have any suggestions?
    • Scot McPherson
      I have experience, with beetles and moths too. Only put in combs the bees can defend. The biggest problem with any pest like SHB or Wax Moth is undefended
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 30, 2007
        I have experience, with beetles and moths too.

        Only put in combs the bees can defend. The biggest problem with any pest
        like SHB or Wax Moth is undefended territory. SHB and WAX moth can only use
        empty unused combs for laying eggs in, except for hive corners which you
        can't remove. You can however reduce unused comb. This is exactly the same
        problem as over-supering a langstroth hive that can't handle defending that
        much comb. Empty spaces and strong colonies are your best friends when
        combating moths and beetles.

        If you can, remove the empty combs and only give them one at a time. You
        might want to situate that one comb in the middle of what is left of the
        brood nest so it is the center of attention and not at the fringes.

        When going into winter this year, remove all the comb you can, and leave
        only full honey combs outside the brood nest. Don't leave any empty combs
        and don't leave too many combs for the bees to attend to at ANY time of the
        year.

        That is my suggestion, and that method works and has worked 99% of the time
        throughout the history of managed beekeeping.


        Scot McPherson
        McPherson Family Farms
        Davenport, IA


        -----Original Message-----
        From: TopHive@yahoogroups.com [mailto:TopHive@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
        theseventhsamuri
        Sent: Monday, April 30, 2007 6:54 PM
        To: TopHive@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [TopHive] TBH decimated by SHB

        My oldest and strongest hive has been nearly destroyed by the small
        hive beetle. Going into winter the hive was very strong with plenty of
        stores and it was during my last check for the season I spotted a beetle.

        Upon the spring check I found 2/3rds of the bees dead with beetles and
        beetle larva among the piles of dead bees on the floor. Amazingly, the
        remaining bees are bringing in pollen, I found capped brood and also
        found the queen alive and well. They are only using a small area of
        undamaged comb near the top.

        In desperation I cut out nearly all of the damaged comb, scraped the
        bottom board clean and removed excess honey stores. I added some nice
        empty white combs from my other (uneffected) hive into the brood nest
        and put a full bar of capped honey on each end.

        I'm in NW Lower Michigan surrounded by commerical orchards. The
        hunderds of hives they use for pollination services are moved to
        Florida and back and I suspect this is where the SHB came from.
        Regardless of the source I need to take action to protect my other
        hives and hopefully save the one that is affected.

        I hate the thought of using chemicals but will do what ever it takes.
        Anybody with experience have any suggestions?



        The group archive and other pages can be accessed at
        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TopHive

        Yahoo! Groups Links
      • Rich M
        Thanks Scott. Makes sense, I ll be sure and keep that in mind. Rich
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 30, 2007
          Thanks Scott. Makes sense, I'll be sure and keep that in mind.

          Rich

          Scot McPherson wrote:
          >
          >
          > I have experience, with beetles and moths too.
          >
          > Only put in combs the bees can defend. The biggest problem with any pest
          > like SHB or Wax Moth is undefended territory. SHB and WAX moth can
          > only use
          > empty unused combs for laying eggs in, except for hive corners which you
          > can't remove. You can however reduce unused comb. This is exactly the same
          > problem as over-supering a langstroth hive that can't handle defending
          > that
          > much comb. Empty spaces and strong colonies are your best friends when
          > combating moths and beetles.
          >
          > If you can, remove the empty combs and only give them one at a time. You
          > might want to situate that one comb in the middle of what is left of the
          > brood nest so it is the center of attention and not at the fringes.
          >
          > When going into winter this year, remove all the comb you can, and leave
          > only full honey combs outside the brood nest. Don't leave any empty combs
          > and don't leave too many combs for the bees to attend to at ANY time
          > of the
          > year.
          >
          > That is my suggestion, and that method works and has worked 99% of the
          > time
          > throughout the history of managed beekeeping.
          >
          > Scot McPherson
          > McPherson Family Farms
          > Davenport, IA
          >
          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: TopHive@yahoogroups.com <mailto:TopHive%40yahoogroups.com>
          > [mailto:TopHive@yahoogroups.com <mailto:TopHive%40yahoogroups.com>] On
          > Behalf Of
          > theseventhsamuri
          > Sent: Monday, April 30, 2007 6:54 PM
          > To: TopHive@yahoogroups.com <mailto:TopHive%40yahoogroups.com>
          > Subject: [TopHive] TBH decimated by SHB
          >
          > My oldest and strongest hive has been nearly destroyed by the small
          > hive beetle. Going into winter the hive was very strong with plenty of
          > stores and it was during my last check for the season I spotted a beetle.
          >
          > Upon the spring check I found 2/3rds of the bees dead with beetles and
          > beetle larva among the piles of dead bees on the floor. Amazingly, the
          > remaining bees are bringing in pollen, I found capped brood and also
          > found the queen alive and well. They are only using a small area of
          > undamaged comb near the top.
          >
          > In desperation I cut out nearly all of the damaged comb, scraped the
          > bottom board clean and removed excess honey stores. I added some nice
          > empty white combs from my other (uneffected) hive into the brood nest
          > and put a full bar of capped honey on each end.
          >
          > I'm in NW Lower Michigan surrounded by commerical orchards. The
          > hunderds of hives they use for pollination services are moved to
          > Florida and back and I suspect this is where the SHB came from.
          > Regardless of the source I need to take action to protect my other
          > hives and hopefully save the one that is affected.
          >
          > I hate the thought of using chemicals but will do what ever it takes.
          > Anybody with experience have any suggestions?
          >
          > The group archive and other pages can be accessed at
          > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TopHive
          > <http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TopHive>
          >
          > Yahoo! Groups Links
          >
          >
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