Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

hive collapse

Expand Messages
  • Carolyn Chaney
    I can t be feeling too superior in spite of my top bar hives and organic management. I just lost two of my three top bar hives, and I have no idea why. My
    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 14, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      I can't be feeling too superior in spite of my top bar hives and
      organic management. I just lost two of my three top bar hives, and I
      have no idea why. My garden is organic, I use no chemicals in my
      hives, and I live in an area without huge use of pesticides. I
      don't move my hives around, and I go into them only about once a
      month in spring/summer. One hive had been a swarm from a local guy
      at my bee club, and those bees, while noisy and fierce all summer,
      never produced much honey last year. So I thought I might lose
      them, due to lack of stores for the winter. But the other hive was a
      new, gentle but industrious package that produced tons of honey and
      seemed quite vigorous going into winter. In fact they seemed fine
      most of the winter. But when I got home from vacation (after N. CA
      had a bad cold snap), the bees were dead. In the hive are large
      beautiful combs filled with honey, and small handfuls of dead bees
      clinging to the brood comb and on the hive floor. Both hives built
      their own comb, but I did allow a bit of "starter comb" that I had
      frozen from a previous hive. Did I give them infected comb?

      Is this sudden hive collapse? Or California bees unprepared for
      freezing weather? I don't know. Furthermore, I don't know if it is
      safe to put new bees into the hives, or if they might be infected
      with some virus. I would appreciate any advice from the more
      experienced members of the group. My oldest and only surviving hive
      is going strong. It is going into its third summer and is descended
      from an Italian package from Honeybee Genetics; maybe it is more
      disease resistant.

      Carolyn Chaney
      cchaney@...

      > "Tell me, what is it you plan to do with your one wild and precious
      > life?"
      > --Mary Oliver
      >




      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • David Croteau
      I lost a strong hive last winter. I think it had to many open spaces (unfilled honeycomb) and they clustered in small bunches all over the place and succumbed
      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 15, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        I lost a strong hive last winter. I think it had to many open spaces
        (unfilled honeycomb) and they clustered in small bunches all over the place
        and succumbed to the cold,
        Maybe they just got the flue. Theres a lot of viruses out there.


        On 2/14/07, Carolyn Chaney <cchaney@...> wrote:
        >
        > I can't be feeling too superior in spite of my top bar hives and
        > organic management. I just lost two of my three top bar hives, and I
        > have no idea why. My garden is organic, I use no chemicals in my
        > hives, and I live in an area without huge use of pesticides. I
        > don't move my hives around, and I go into them only about once a
        > month in spring/summer. One hive had been a swarm from a local guy
        > at my bee club, and those bees, while noisy and fierce all summer,
        > never produced much honey last year. So I thought I might lose
        > them, due to lack of stores for the winter. But the other hive was a
        > new, gentle but industrious package that produced tons of honey and
        > seemed quite vigorous going into winter. In fact they seemed fine
        > most of the winter. But when I got home from vacation (after N. CA
        > had a bad cold snap), the bees were dead. In the hive are large
        > beautiful combs filled with honey, and small handfuls of dead bees
        > clinging to the brood comb and on the hive floor. Both hives built
        > their own comb, but I did allow a bit of "starter comb" that I had
        > frozen from a previous hive. Did I give them infected comb?
        >
        > Is this sudden hive collapse? Or California bees unprepared for
        > freezing weather? I don't know. Furthermore, I don't know if it is
        > safe to put new bees into the hives, or if they might be infected
        > with some virus. I would appreciate any advice from the more
        > experienced members of the group. My oldest and only surviving hive
        > is going strong. It is going into its third summer and is descended
        > from an Italian package from Honeybee Genetics; maybe it is more
        > disease resistant.
        >
        > Carolyn Chaney
        > cchaney@... <cchaney%40sfsu.edu>
        >
        > > "Tell me, what is it you plan to do with your one wild and precious
        > > life?"
        > > --Mary Oliver
        > >
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >
        >



        --
        Dave, Skowhegan-ME


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.