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Re: [TopHive] Re: Entrance

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  • Maureen Russell
    Hi I used Les Crowder s plans. He is in alburquerque,NM. His website is www.fortheloveofthebees.com. He has also written a book titled top-bar beekeeping by
    Message 1 of 7 , May 26, 2013
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      Hi I used Les Crowder's plans. He is in alburquerque,NM. His website is www.fortheloveofthebees.com. He has also written a book titled "top-bar beekeeping" by Les Crowder and Heather Harrell. I have 5 TBH. They do great in his hives. I was very intrigued by the golden mean hive but it is a little too small in length. I found in miami that I needed a much bigger tbh. I believe mine are 48 inch long, I placed my entrances in the front by my landing board.
      Maureen

      Sent from my iPad

      On May 26, 2013, at 7:19 AM, "roger g" <toad08551@...> wrote:

      > I'm another topbeek to chime in LOL I like and use plans from the bee wrangler, i think the plans are on biobees.com. I put main entrance on the ends with some 1" holes along sides i plug and remove as they need. seems to work great for me.
      > Top bars are great when i do bee tours at the vineyard, they'er much easier to pop open and show people. the bees seem much more docil in topbars than the langs and easier to get to areas to show honey & brood. roger NJ
      >
      > --- In TopHive@yahoogroups.com, "karon" <karon@...> wrote:
      > >
      > > Ok, I am planning to build a Golden Mean hive and I need to decide how to
      > > place the entrance. Would you recommend drilling holes that can be plugged
      > > with corks or cut out a long continual opening? Where would you put the
      > > entrance? In the middle of the hive on the side or would you place it on one
      > > end or the other of the hive. Seems to me it would do well in the center of
      > > the long side. That way, the bees would not have to crawl the length of the
      > > entire hive to come to the working section of the hive. They would be
      > > working from a center brood comb, then, honey comb could be deposited on
      > > either side. Is it the experience of the group that this is the process? or
      > > will they fill one end or the other and THEN swap ends?
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Now, I live in the Deep South. South East Tennessee. So, we have a LONG
      > > season. Some people would say we almost don't have a winter so far as bees
      > > are concerned. There are very few periods of time when the temp is pretty
      > > chilly. But, in all, Winter happens 3-6 times per year and is defined as
      > > the temps run about 20 at night and 40 in the day. Then, it warms back to
      > > 50s-60s+ in the day and somewhere in the upper 30's at night. So, I think
      > > TBH would give me the advantage of the bees working whenever THEY like.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Anyway, thoughts?
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Karon Adams
      > >
      > > Accredited Jewelry Professional (GIA)
      > >
      > > You can send a Rosary to a soldier!
      > >
      > > www.facebook.com/MilitaryRosary
      > >
      > > www.YellowRibbonRosaries.com
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      > >
      >
      >


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • karon
      You know, I have seen some TBH hives for sale that are 2 feet long and, TBH, I cannot see that working AT ALL where I live. Perhaps that is because some people
      Message 2 of 7 , May 26, 2013
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        You know, I have seen some TBH hives for sale that are 2 feet long and, TBH,
        I cannot see that working AT ALL where I live. Perhaps that is because some
        people live in more northern climates. I live in South East Tennessee. Bees
        fly here all year long. There are really only a few DAYS in the year, much
        less weeks or months, when bees don't fly. I cannot imagine a TBH less than
        3 feet even beginning to be long enough to produce without a swarm. I am
        planning on making mine 4'. I think that will be a good number. I can build
        up good, strong colonies that will produce fairly well.



        Of course, that also makes building the hive VERY easy. I was at the
        hardware store yesterday and I realized that building two 4' hives would
        cost me less than $50 (not including the top bars) So, Probably Tuesday,
        I'll go over to the store and if I can talk them into doing it, I'll have
        them cut my board lengths for me. I need a 1x6x8 feet cut in half. That is
        the bottom for two hives.



        Then, a 1X12x8 cut in half for the sides. A 1x12x6 cut into quarters for the
        ends and follower boards. That way, the hive is about the same comb area as
        a lang stacked hive of about 4 deep hive bodies. That is a full season here.



        Karon Adams

        Accredited Jewelry Professional (GIA)

        You can send a Rosary to a soldier!

        www.facebook.com/MilitaryRosary

        www.YellowRibbonRosaries.com



        From: TopHive@yahoogroups.com [mailto:TopHive@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
        Susan Kegley
        Sent: Saturday, May 25, 2013 9:33 AM
        To: TopHive@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: Re: [TopHive] Entrance





        Hi Karon,

        If you drill holes instead of a long continuous opening you have more
        options. Having the entrance in the middle is best for the reason you
        said, but also because you can work the hive from either end. Faster for
        doing inspections. But if you drill three large-ish holes (about 2"
        diameter) in the middle and on both ends (see Bee Thinking
        <http://www.beethinking.com/top-bar-hive> hives (Image #5) for an
        example), you can have multiple colonies in a single hive body, at least
        for a short while, like when you capture a swarm or do a split. They
        grow out of it pretty fast in the springtime, but it is like having an
        extra hive body when you most need it!

        Good luck!

        Susan

        On 5/25/13 5:21 AM, karon wrote:
        >
        > Ok, I am planning to build a Golden Mean hive and I need to decide how to
        > place the entrance. Would you recommend drilling holes that can be plugged
        > with corks or cut out a long continual opening? Where would you put the
        > entrance? In the middle of the hive on the side or would you place it
        > on one
        > end or the other of the hive. Seems to me it would do well in the
        > center of
        > the long side. That way, the bees would not have to crawl the length
        > of the
        > entire hive to come to the working section of the hive. They would be
        > working from a center brood comb, then, honey comb could be deposited on
        > either side. Is it the experience of the group that this is the
        > process? or
        > will they fill one end or the other and THEN swap ends?
        >
        > Now, I live in the Deep South. South East Tennessee. So, we have a LONG
        > season. Some people would say we almost don't have a winter so far as bees
        > are concerned. There are very few periods of time when the temp is pretty
        > chilly. But, in all, Winter happens 3-6 times per year and is defined as
        > the temps run about 20 at night and 40 in the day. Then, it warms back to
        > 50s-60s+ in the day and somewhere in the upper 30's at night. So, I think
        > TBH would give me the advantage of the bees working whenever THEY like.
        >
        > Anyway, thoughts?
        >
        > Karon Adams
        >
        > Accredited Jewelry Professional (GIA)
        >
        > You can send a Rosary to a soldier!
        >
        > www.facebook.com/MilitaryRosary
        >
        > www.YellowRibbonRosaries.com
        >
        > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        >
        >

        --
        Susan E. Kegley, Ph.D., Principal and CEO
        Pesticide Research Institute
        1400 Shattuck Ave, #8
        Berkeley, CA 94709

        Phone: (510) 705-1874
        Fax: (510) 705-1683
        E-mail: skegley@...
        <mailto:skegley%40pesticideresearch.com>
        Web: http://www.pesticideresearch.com

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