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Re: How To Begin--I'm stuck

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  • urbisagricola
    All: Sorry about that. I neglected to put a subject in the subject line and my post may have looked like spam. We ve looked into different kinds of hives and
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 14, 2012
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      All:

      Sorry about that. I neglected to put a subject in the subject line and my post may have looked like spam.

      We've looked into different kinds of hives and are interested in the top bar model. That's a given. The problem is--"How to begin"? And maybe I should be more specific about where I am getting hung up.

      I bought a book called "Top Bar Beekeeping" by Crowder and Harrell. Being new to beekeeping, I have a little trouble following it sometimes, but I THINK I understand how to build the hive. As far as getting bees, I have friends/acquatances who raise bees in Langstroth hives who know how to catch swarms (or I guess I could order some bees), so I think I can find bees.

      Where I am stuck is how to get bees to set up in the the hive. Unless I am missing something, I don't see that the author of the book above tells how to do that. And here is where my original question comes in (should I start out with Langstroth hives to get my feet wet) because it just seems hard for someone to write a readable book that can explan what one needs to know. There is an old saying in my family "You learn by seeing and by doing"--a hands on teacher is probably the best way to learn.

      It seems like a shame to go to the expense of buying all the stuff to do Langstroth hiuves if I ultimately want to do top bar. On the other hand, I may be just setting myself up for frustration trying to do this with books.

      Maybe another or slightly different question would be, do you know a place that has good step my step instructions?





      --- In TopHive@yahoogroups.com, OOWONBS@... wrote:
      >
      > (no subject)
      > Posted by: "Urbis Agricola" urbisagricola@
      >
      > >All:A friend of mine and I both have children who are interested in beekeeping. We are interested in doing some sort of sustainable beekeeping, but everyone in our area that we are aware of, does Langstrogh hives. We've been reading about top bar hives, but it sounds like it is a little harder to get into. Do you think it would be wise or foolish to start out with Langstroth hives so that we can learn from local people we know and then once we get ourselves oriented, transition to top bar or Warre hives or something?
      >
      > FYI - "(no subject)" is what the latest spam craze uses.
      >
      > Many will not open msgs labeled thusly.
      >
      > It depends HOW you want to start.
      > And what you want to accomplish, via the bees.
      >
      > Do you want to make a lot of honey? A lot of wax?
      > Do it cheaply? Or mostly, just have bees...?
      >
      > You can start with a package, comb that you attach
      > to a TB/topbar, or TBs or frames that are already
      > occupied. Each has advantages.
      >
      > From a learning standpoint,, I thiMk the majority of
      > Langers use "treatments," while Warré folks rarely do.
      >
      > This can be a crucial area to consider. Many folks
      > who treat believe that if you do not, you are inviting
      > disease promotion in the area. This trend is reversing,
      > albeit very slowly. Chickens underwent the same issue
      > a few years back. Routine treatments began to breed
      > resistant diseases. It took a law to end this routine.
      >
      > BillSF9c
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
    • Joycelyn Kasmir
      Start Here: http://www.bushfarms.com/beestopbarhives.htm That guy s site is full of great information. -- Joycelyn Kasmir DiamondJFarms.com Home of Country
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 14, 2012
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        Start Here:

        http://www.bushfarms.com/beestopbarhives.htm

        That guy's site is full of great information.

        --
        Joycelyn Kasmir
        DiamondJFarms.com
        Home of "Country Side" TB son of Secretariat
        and "Sparklin High Cotton" Cremello QH Grandson of Shining Spark



        On 10/14/2012 7:28 AM, urbisagricola wrote:
        > All:
        >
        > Sorry about that. I neglected to put a subject in the subject line and my post may have looked like spam.
        >
        > We've looked into different kinds of hives and are interested in the top bar model. That's a given. The problem is--"How to begin"? And maybe I should be more specific about where I am getting hung up.
        >
        > I bought a book called "Top Bar Beekeeping" by Crowder and Harrell. Being new to beekeeping, I have a little trouble following it sometimes, but I THINK I understand how to build the hive. As far as getting bees, I have friends/acquatances who raise bees in Langstroth hives who know how to catch swarms (or I guess I could order some bees), so I think I can find bees.
        >
        > Where I am stuck is how to get bees to set up in the the hive. Unless I am missing something, I don't see that the author of the book above tells how to do that. And here is where my original question comes in (should I start out with Langstroth hives to get my feet wet) because it just seems hard for someone to write a readable book that can explan what one needs to know. There is an old saying in my family "You learn by seeing and by doing"--a hands on teacher is probably the best way to learn.
        >
        > It seems like a shame to go to the expense of buying all the stuff to do Langstroth hiuves if I ultimately want to do top bar. On the other hand, I may be just setting myself up for frustration trying to do this with books.
        >
        > Maybe another or slightly different question would be, do you know a place that has good step my step instructions?
        >
        >
      • Barb Barton
        I started with a top bar three years ago. I bought a package and put it in a completely comb free hive. They built up the comb and all was well. I know have
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 15, 2012
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          I started with a top bar three years ago. I bought a package and put it in
          a completely comb free hive. They built up the comb and all was well. I
          know have two top bar hives and two Langs. I find the top bars easier to
          work, especially the TB that has an observation window, I don't need to
          open it up if everything looks good from outside. I don't harvest much from
          the TBs, mostly from the Langs.

          As far as treatment, if you follow the organic beekeepers yahoo group, you
          will observe that the trend it toward downsizing bees to their original
          size before commercialization made them bigger. The smaller bees aren't
          affected by varoa and such because their trachea are smaller, and are
          healthier all around. I will be switching over eventually. I do not use
          treatment on any of my hives, and by treatment we mean chemical treatment.
          You can order small bees from Wolf Creek Apiaries. If I knew this ahead of
          time I would have started off with the smaller bees. It is harder to
          downsize once you have an established hive.

          Barb

          --
          *Barb Barton
          (734) 576-8427

          *"Your present circumstances don't determine where you can go; they simply
          determine where you start." Nido Qubein
          <http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/a/annlanders132029.html>
          *
          *


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • OOWONBS@Netscape.net
          ... Hey - No offense. We ALL ferget a Subject line or some other stuff, now and then. Heck, I repost a whole Digest about 1x a year. HOW to begin can be a few
          Message 4 of 5 , Oct 15, 2012
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            urbisagricola wrote:
            >We've looked into different kinds of hives and are interested in the top bar model. That's a given. The problem is--"How to begin"? And maybe I should be more specific about where I am getting hung up.

            Hey - No offense. We ALL ferget a Subject line or some
            other stuff, now and then. Heck, I repost a whole Digest
            about 1x a year.

            HOW to begin can be a few ways.
            It sorta depends a lot, on how you get the bees...
            As a nuc. as comb with honey & brood, on frames, and
            they make their own queen or you buy one, with this or
            separately... Or as a "Package" of 2, 3, or 4 lbs.

            Rather than regurgitate it all, can you tell us which way you
            thiMk you'll go?

            >...On the other hand, I may be just setting myself up for frustration trying to do this with books.Maybe another or slightly different question would be, do you know a place that has good step my step instructions?

            For cooking or computers or motorcycle maintenance, I always
            suggest at least 2 books. Better if they are from 2 dif publishers
            and authors, as each says things , "IOW., differently. I like one
            to be a thick reference and one to be a primer. By spring
            you can have read 5 books easily, from your library.
            You can just read what you want in each & skim the rest.

            There's a free eBook on the Warré list. If you've forgotten, they are a stacked
            TB/topbar hive. Sorta like a Lang, but usually w/o frames. Easiest to make, save
            for the roof, and there is a simple version of THAT.

            With a HTBH, aka, [usually] a Trapeziodal TBH, (as I suppose
            you intend,) the "How to Install Bees," is largely the same.
            You place in TB's w/comb, or, you pour in the bees, if a
            package. There are details, to each, and options. Example;
            Smoke was the necessary tool. Now, many use a water spritz,
            perhaps with the lightest of syrups, or use nothing. I didn't
            get a smoker. My experience is quite limited, but so far, no
            stings.

            Usual rules: No after shave or cologne. Don't take a drink to
            calm your nerves or have on fresh deodorant. Light colored
            clothing is suggested as animals wanting the brood tend to
            be dark - yet - many wear blue jeans... Don't breath a lot of
            your CO2 on them. That's a hungry animals nose in their
            business. No fast movements. Be still, or move slowly,
            w/o jerks in your motion.

            Will you have a suit? Or, as I, jury rig something?

            I have an idea... But I need to know the width of a Lang
            frame. And maybe the depth... Anyone?

            BillSF9c



            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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