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  • Urbis Agricola
    All: A friend of mine and I both have children who are interested in beekeeping. We are interested in doing some sort of sustainable beekeeping, but everyone
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 11, 2012
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      All:

      A friend of mine and I both have children who are interested in beekeeping. We are interested in doing some sort of sustainable beekeeping, but everyone in our area that we are aware of, does Langstrogh hives. We've been reading about top bar hives, but it sounds like it is a little harder to get into. Do you think it would be wise or foolish to start out with Langstroth hives so that we can learn from local people we know and then once we get ourselves oriented, transition to top bar or Warre hives or something?

      Thanks!

      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Kewisch, Jorg
      It does not matter how you start. If you get bitten by the bee bug you will eventually want to try the other method. You should however attend a beekeeping
      Message 2 of 3 , Oct 11, 2012
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        It does not matter how you start. If you get bitten by the bee bug you will eventually want to try the other method. You should however attend a beekeeping class. What you learn there can be applied to both methods. My monthly bee class consisted of 1 hour bee yard and 1 1/2 hour class room. So my first contact with bees was in the presence of my teacher. That was the most important part, it gave me the confidence to handle bees. If you don't have such a class ask another beekeeper for help the first time. If he/she does not want to help because of the top bar hive he/she is narrow-minded and you won't learn anything from that person. But all the beekeeper I met are the nicest people.





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      • roger g
        It would help i when you post to let us know where your from perhaps someone on your area would could guide you better. I have both topbar and langs,for the
        Message 3 of 3 , Oct 12, 2012
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          It would help i when you post to let us know where your from perhaps someone on your area would could guide you better.
          I have both topbar and langs,for the hobbie beek i think the topbars remain more dosil. I often go into my topbars with no vail, and i never ware glove unless i know it's an aggresive colony. I've made several topbars for fellow beeks and so far all enjoy.
          Folks here are very helpfull, if you post a question answers pop up rather quick. I know it's not like looking over someones shoulder but helps. A good mentor is best.
          You can start with either top or langs,both are fun. you most always find something new and interesting when checking hives.I feed my topbar by putting quart chick waterers right in hive behind comb and works great LOL not too close when building comb i had one once enclose the jar with comb.(another lesson learned)
          I could go on and i'm sure others will. Good luck . Roger-NJ

          --- In TopHive@yahoogroups.com, Urbis Agricola <urbisagricola@...> wrote:
          >
          > All:
          >
          > A friend of mine and I both have children who are interested in beekeeping. We are interested in doing some sort of sustainable beekeeping, but everyone in our area that we are aware of, does Langstrogh hives. We've been reading about top bar hives, but it sounds like it is a little harder to get into. Do you think it would be wise or foolish to start out with Langstroth hives so that we can learn from local people we know and then once we get ourselves oriented, transition to top bar or Warre hives or something?
          >
          > Thanks!
          >
          > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          >
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