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Re: [TopHive] Rubber Bands?

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  • OOWONBS@Netscape.net
    I ve heard of using rubber bands... and string. It seems that the bees eventually remove the string. Do they remove the rubber bands? And as some beeks are
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 26, 2011
      I've heard of using rubber bands... and string.
      It seems that the bees eventually remove the string.
      Do they remove the rubber bands?


      And as some beeks are carefl of what they put in a hive
      (or on one,) I ask, what of off-gassing?
      Quite a few rubber bands stink of sulphur and etc.


      Thought. Kite string may be easily strung through a comb
      via the use os an upholtery needle, which is like a large
      sewing needle. (Some are curved.)


      BillSF9c



      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Jacqueline and Joseph Freeman
      I ve got a rubber band question, too. I know when I ve used string to hold the combs in, once they anchor the comb in a few days later, they chew through the
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 27, 2011
        I've got a rubber band question, too. I know when I've used string to hold the combs in, once they anchor the comb in a few days later, they chew through the string and start carrying it out. I expect that they'd do the same thing with the rubber bands, but unlike string, the rubber band would have a big snapping twang to it when it breaks. I expect bees would be harmed by that and given how many bands it takes to do a move, you could cause quite a bit of damage in there.

        Any thoughts on this?

        Jacqueline Freeman

        Friendly Haven Rise Farm
        www.friendlyhaven.com
        Venersborg, Wa
      • Traci Perg
        I ve only done it once, and I used two really big thick rubber bands. When I checked a month later, they had anchored in the comb, but the rubber band was
        Message 3 of 5 , Jun 27, 2011
          I've only done it once, and I used two really big thick rubber bands. When I
          checked a month later, they had anchored in the comb, but the rubber band
          was still there, so I removed it.

          Traci

          On Mon, Jun 27, 2011 at 6:29 PM, Jacqueline and Joseph Freeman <
          j88@...> wrote:

          > **
          >
          >
          > I've got a rubber band question, too. I know when I've used string to hold
          > the combs in, once they anchor the comb in a few days later, they chew
          > through the string and start carrying it out. I expect that they'd do the
          > same thing with the rubber bands, but unlike string, the rubber band would
          > have a big snapping twang to it when it breaks. I expect bees would be
          > harmed by that and given how many bands it takes to do a move, you could
          > cause quite a bit of damage in there.
          >
          > Any thoughts on this?
          >
          > Jacqueline Freeman
          >
          > Friendly Haven Rise Farm
          > www.friendlyhaven.com
          > Venersborg, Wa
          >
          >
          >



          --
          "We hold this treasure in earthen vessels, that the surpassing power may be
          of G-d and not from us. We are afflicted in every way, but not constrained;
          perplexed, but not driven to despair; persecuted, but not abandoned; struck
          down, but not destroyed"
          2 Corinthians 4: 7-9


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Christy Hemenway
          When we ve used rubber bands, the bees first anchor the comb, some of it to the bands themselves, and then chew through in multiple places and remove them in
          Message 4 of 5 , Jun 28, 2011
            When we've used rubber bands, the bees first anchor the comb, some of it to the bands themselves, and then chew through in multiple places and remove them in chunks.

            No twanging!

            -- Christy Hemenway
            GOLD STAR HONEYBEES
            PO Box 1061
            Bath, Maine, USA 04530
            207-449-1121
            www.goldstarhoneybees.com

            "When one tugs at a single thing in nature, one finds it attached to the rest of the world." -- John Muir
          • Larry Krengel
            When we ve used rubber bands, the bees first anchor the comb, some of it to the bands themselves, and then chew through in multiple places and remove them in
            Message 5 of 5 , Jun 29, 2011
              When we've used rubber bands, the bees first anchor the comb, some of it to the bands themselves, and then chew through in multiple places and remove them in chunks.

              -------------------------------------------

              I use the very thin rubber bands to hold comb in Langstroth frames when I move comb during a bee extraction. The bees handle it fine. They build around the rubber bands and I later find pieces that have been chewed off. Never noticed any bad effects.

              Larry Krengel
              Marengo, IL USA

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
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