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Plastic Wood

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  • rmontag48
    Hi Again, Everyone: I have recently become concerned that I potentially did something to screw-up 2 of my hives. In constructing my last 2 hives, I filled
    Message 1 of 9 , Apr 20 9:24 AM
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      Hi Again, Everyone:

      I have recently become concerned that I potentially did something to screw-up 2 of my hives. In constructing my last 2 hives, I filled some substantial gaps in the wooden boards with Plastic Wood. Although it has been about 2 weeks since I did that, there appeared to be some residual odor from its use, so I rubbed a bunch of bees-wax on the dried Plastic Wood, but I'm pretty sure that it failed to mask the odor. My bees are scheduled to be mailed to me on the week of April 23rd so they're not here (Maryland) yet, and since the hives are not yet occupied, the questions that I have at this point are:

      1) Did I really screw things up as far as the bees are concerned?
      2) Will the bees get t'hell out of Dodge because of those odors?
      3) Is there anything I can/should do to mask these odors?

      Your feedback is most urgently needed.

      Raf
    • James Zitting
      The bees do not seem to like plastic, even though you see several plastic product for bee hives. I don t like using it, however the bees are very resilient and
      Message 2 of 9 , Apr 23 1:07 AM
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        The bees do not seem to like plastic, even though you see several plastic
        product for bee hives. I don't like using it, however the bees are very
        resilient and creative with sealing off and covering up what they don't
        like. If you can use only untreated wood.



        James



        From: TopHive@yahoogroups.com [mailto:TopHive@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
        rmontag48
        Sent: Wednesday, April 20, 2011 11:24 AM
        To: TopHive@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [TopHive] Plastic Wood





        Hi Again, Everyone:

        I have recently become concerned that I potentially did something to
        screw-up 2 of my hives. In constructing my last 2 hives, I filled some
        substantial gaps in the wooden boards with Plastic Wood. Although it has
        been about 2 weeks since I did that, there appeared to be some residual odor
        from its use, so I rubbed a bunch of bees-wax on the dried Plastic Wood, but
        I'm pretty sure that it failed to mask the odor. My bees are scheduled to be
        mailed to me on the week of April 23rd so they're not here (Maryland) yet,
        and since the hives are not yet occupied, the questions that I have at this
        point are:

        1) Did I really screw things up as far as the bees are concerned?
        2) Will the bees get t'hell out of Dodge because of those odors?
        3) Is there anything I can/should do to mask these odors?

        Your feedback is most urgently needed.

        Raf





        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • roger g
        When i have a gap i want to fill i just mixe up some of the sawdust with titebonb2 glue i use for gluing and fill it in. Bees haven t complained or proped
        Message 3 of 9 , Apr 23 6:17 AM
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          When i have a gap i want to fill i just mixe up some of the sawdust with titebonb2 glue i use for gluing and fill it in. Bees haven't complained or proped over roger

          --- In TopHive@yahoogroups.com, "James Zitting" <james@...> wrote:
          >
          > The bees do not seem to like plastic, even though you see several plastic

          > I have recently become concerned that I potentially did something to
          > screw-up 2 of my hives. In constructing my last 2 hives, I filled some
          > substantial gaps in the wooden boards with Plastic Wood. Although it has
          > been about 2 weeks since I did that, there appeared to be some residual odor
        • Rafael Montag
          A good idea and certainly something to keep in mind for the future, but for right now do you think I can look forward to a mass exodus when I install my 2
          Message 4 of 9 , Apr 23 10:13 AM
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            A good idea and certainly something to keep in mind for the future, but for
            right now do you think I can look forward to a mass exodus when I install my 2
            packages in those 2 hives?




            ________________________________
            From: roger g <toad08551@...>
            To: TopHive@yahoogroups.com
            Sent: Sat, April 23, 2011 9:17:15 AM
            Subject: [TopHive] Re: Plastic Wood

             
            When i have a gap i want to fill i just mixe up some of the sawdust with
            titebonb2 glue i use for gluing and fill it in. Bees haven't complained or
            proped over roger

            --- In TopHive@yahoogroups.com, "James Zitting" <james@...> wrote:
            >
            > The bees do not seem to like plastic, even though you see several plastic

            > I have recently become concerned that I potentially did something to
            > screw-up 2 of my hives. In constructing my last 2 hives, I filled some
            > substantial gaps in the wooden boards with Plastic Wood. Although it has
            > been about 2 weeks since I did that, there appeared to be some residual odor




            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Rafael Montag
            Thanks for the feedback.  I ll just intall them and hope for the best. ________________________________ From: James Zitting To:
            Message 5 of 9 , Apr 23 10:15 AM
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              Thanks for the feedback.  I'll just intall them and hope for the best.




              ________________________________
              From: James Zitting <james@...>
              To: TopHive@yahoogroups.com
              Sent: Sat, April 23, 2011 4:07:06 AM
              Subject: RE: [TopHive] Plastic Wood

               
              The bees do not seem to like plastic, even though you see several plastic
              product for bee hives. I don't like using it, however the bees are very
              resilient and creative with sealing off and covering up what they don't
              like. If you can use only untreated wood.

              James

              From: TopHive@yahoogroups.com [mailto:TopHive@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
              rmontag48
              Sent: Wednesday, April 20, 2011 11:24 AM
              To: TopHive@yahoogroups.com
              Subject: [TopHive] Plastic Wood

              Hi Again, Everyone:

              I have recently become concerned that I potentially did something to
              screw-up 2 of my hives. In constructing my last 2 hives, I filled some
              substantial gaps in the wooden boards with Plastic Wood. Although it has
              been about 2 weeks since I did that, there appeared to be some residual odor
              from its use, so I rubbed a bunch of bees-wax on the dried Plastic Wood, but
              I'm pretty sure that it failed to mask the odor. My bees are scheduled to be
              mailed to me on the week of April 23rd so they're not here (Maryland) yet,
              and since the hives are not yet occupied, the questions that I have at this
              point are:

              1) Did I really screw things up as far as the bees are concerned?
              2) Will the bees get t'hell out of Dodge because of those odors?
              3) Is there anything I can/should do to mask these odors?

              Your feedback is most urgently needed.

              Raf

              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]




              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • OOWONBS@Netscape.net
              ... scheduled to bemailed to me on the week of April 23rd so they re not here (Maryland) yet,and since the hives are not yet occupied, the questions that I
              Message 6 of 9 , Apr 23 11:42 PM
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                >but I'm pretty sure that it failed to mask the odor. My bees are
                scheduled to bemailed to me on the week of April 23rd so they're not
                here (Maryland) yet,and since the hives are not yet occupied, the
                questions that I have at thispoint are:1) Did I really screw things up
                as far as the bees are concerned?2) Will the bees get t'hell out of
                Dodge because of those odors?3) Is there anything I can/should do to
                mask these odors?Your feedback is most urgently needed.Raf

                Can you replace or patch that piece, and cut the plastic wood out/ IF
                you detect it, I doubt they will like it at all. And they prolly cost
                you a hundred smackers. And are getting a LIL hard to even find.

                BillSF9c
              • Christy Hemenway
                Hi Raf -- I can understand your concern, especially since there s an odor. It sounds like you ve done some logical things to try to compensate for the smell,
                Message 7 of 9 , Apr 24 5:29 AM
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                  Hi Raf --

                  I can understand your concern, especially since there's an odor.
                  It sounds like you've done some logical things to try to compensate for the smell, so likely you've done all you could with that .

                  But here are some things to think about: Bees have been known to move into some pretty strange places - all on their own, such as: I have heard of bees moving into old automobile gas tanks, and 50 gallon drums that formerly had oil in them. I've pulled them out of spaces in buildings that also contained with loose fiberglas insulation. The original prototype model of the Gold Star hive had silicon caulk in it (smelly, especially when curing!)- and plexiglas observation windows (which off-gas). So it seems like bees might choose their homes based on criteria different from what we think of as important.

                  We have come to believe that avoiding plastic in a hive makes a lot of good sense, as well as things like silicon caulk and plexiglas - having three packages abscond one was our very painful lesson 4 years ago. And to carry that train of thought a little further - we go out of our way to use a non-toxic paint as well as a non-toxic caulk nowadays for the same reasons. We think a box that you are going to invite bees into should be as "benign" as possible.

                  I didn't see anyone mention this though - have you put some lemongrass essential oil into the hive? That's a smell often used as a swarm lure in a bait hive, and around here we give new top bar beekeepers a cotton ball with lemongrass essential oil on it for smearing on the interior wood of the hive - for a first year hive with no good beeswax or brood smells, we use it to help prevent "absconding" - the same concern you have. Seems to work reasonably well, especially when combined with a piece of brood comb - something a first year beekeeper won't have, so we try to provide a chunk of that too, and a piece of florist's wire to attach it to a top bar with.

                  In conclusion, I don't think that there is a cut and dried answer to how the bees will deal with the smell of the Plastic Wood. I think you'll do the best you can about the smell and hope for the best. Annoyingly, some of the best learned lessons are the ones that hurt the most. Also annoyingly, with bees, you don't always get to know exactly "why" anything happens. Why do two hives, side by side in the same apiary sometimes exhibit such completely different behaviors? Sometimes one thrives and one dies! And we wonder why, but often we never really know.

                  Here's wishing you all the best with your bees - which may actually be in the hive by now - and if so, I hope it went well!

                  -- Christy

                  ==================
                  I have recently become concerned that I potentially did something to
                  screw-up 2 of my hives. In constructing my last 2 hives, I filled some
                  substantial gaps in the wooden boards with Plastic Wood. Although it has
                  been about 2 weeks since I did that, there appeared to be some residual odor
                  from its use, so I rubbed a bunch of bees-wax on the dried Plastic Wood, but
                  I'm pretty sure that it failed to mask the odor. My bees are scheduled to be
                  mailed to me on the week of April 23rd so they're not here (Maryland) yet,
                  and since the hives are not yet occupied, the questions that I have at this
                  point are:

                  1) Did I really screw things up as far as the bees are concerned?
                  2) Will the bees get t'hell out of Dodge because of those odors?
                  3) Is there anything I can/should do to mask these odors?

                  Your feedback is most urgently needed.

                  Raf

                  -- Christy Hemenway
                  GOLD STAR HONEYBEES
                  PO Box 1061
                  Bath, Maine, USA 04530
                  207-449-1121
                  www.goldstarhoneybees.com

                  "When one tugs at a single thing in nature, one finds it attached to the rest of the world." -- John Muir



                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • P.H. Rankin Hansen
                  ... Indeed! They can get pretty desperate at times And when you catch a swarm, you can hive them in just about anything as well, as long as it meets a few
                  Message 8 of 9 , Apr 25 5:23 AM
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                    Den 24-04-2011 14:29, Christy Hemenway skrev:
                    > bees might choose their homes based on criteria different from what we think of as important.

                    Indeed! They can get pretty desperate at times

                    And when you catch a swarm, you can hive them in just about anything as
                    well, as long as it meets a few basic requirements, the primary one
                    being volume.

                    One year I ran out of bee boxes and had to put a swarm in a cardboard
                    box, with a few pieces of wood to support the frames. I wrapped the box
                    in a plastic garbage bag to keep the rain out. That worked surprisingly
                    well, and the only "problem" I had, was that the bees eventually gnawed
                    their way through the cardboard her and there.

                    This year, I have prepared cheap swarm traps along similar lines, where
                    I use folded cardboard to support the frames - and like Christy
                    suggests, I have rubbed the insides of the box with lemon grass.

                    --
                    venlig hilsen / best regards / vy 73 de OZ4PH& 5P1H

                    Peter H. Rankin Hansen
                    Stjærvej 15, Storring
                    DK-8464 Galten
                    Danmark

                    (+45) 7586 1688 / (+45) 2211 9611

                    Si vis pacem, para bellum - if you want peace, prepare for war.
                  • tom obrien
                    http://longlangwithlegs.blogspot.com/2009_06_01_archive.html
                    Message 9 of 9 , May 20, 2011
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