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Brood and Honey Bar Sequence

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  • fred flinstone
    Cutting different size bars is going to make for an exciting first year.    Generally in an established hive my bees use the first  5-15 frames for brood
    Message 1 of 31 , Nov 13, 2010
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      Cutting different size bars is going to make for an exciting first year.
         Generally in an established hive my bees use the first  5-15 frames for brood depending on the time of the year. and store extra honey directly behind the brood frames.   
          If it was me I would not worry about using the honey top bars at first they will store honey where ever is handy including a line a few cells deep on the brood frames. I would get them to work on drawing at least 7 or 8 brood frames before I started to worry about using the bigger honey bars. After that your inspections will tell you where to put the honey bars and it will move considerably in the first year.
        To start the hive some where between 12 and 20 bars in front of the follower board is a good place to start depending on the size of the box. for reference mine are about 4ft long 16 in at the top and 9 at the base and about a foot to 14 in deep. I use about 12- 15 bars depending on the size of the swarm.
        I know many people that have had difficulty getting a package to stay in a TB hive and would recommend an excluder on the entrance or just locking them in with syrup for a few days. Natural swarms seem to take better to TB hives for me but that may just be my luck.




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    • talktotheglock27
      I would email Sam and ask him what he has in mind. It s his first year doing the package bee thing, I believe. Frankly, I wouldn t want comb from anyone who I
      Message 31 of 31 , Nov 17, 2010
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        I would email Sam and ask him what he has in mind. It's his first year doing the package bee thing, I believe.
        Frankly, I wouldn't want comb from anyone who I didn't know. You risk adding who knows what disease problems not to mention the chemical laced comb.
        Package bees are trauma survivors normally put with a strange queen. I suppose they need whatever extra support they can get. Maybe getting Lang foundation and chop and crop would help? Personally, I would let them draw out their own comb.

        I have never done any of this before. I started studying all of this last June. Too late to get any bees! What a long wait! But I am glad because I would have ended up with some package of Itailian bees from the deep south that would never have survived in northern vermont.

        The organic bees group on yahoo is a great resource.
        Dennis Murrell's site has tons of info too.
        Then ther are the YouTube videos on topbar hives.
        There's tons of info.
        But I know until I start working with the ladies I won't really start the most important learning of all.


        --- In TopHive@yahoogroups.com, Rafael Montag <rmontag48@...> wrote:
        >
        > Thanks for the idea Caryn.  Chop-and-crop.  What a novel idea.  Sam Comfort told
        > me that I would need a bunch of combs already in the hives so when I get my
        > packages, the queen can start laying right away instead of waiting for the
        > workers to make new comb.  Would this bee a good idea to get starter comb into
        > the hives?  I tried looking for suppliers to sell me combs that I was thinking
        > of wiring to new bars, but for the life of me I couldn't find any.  Does anybody
        > know where I can order some?  Maybe even get some land frames and chop-and-crop
        > if I knew where to get some.  I'd prefer to get some without foundation.  does
        > anyone have any ideas?  How much should I expect to pay per Lang frame?
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > ________________________________
        > From: talktotheglock27 <caryn@...>
        > To: TopHive@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Tue, November 16, 2010 9:08:53 PM
        > Subject: [TopHive] Re: Brood and Honey Bar Sequence
        >
        >  
        > Hi Raf,
        > Chop and crop is what you do to get a Lang frame into a Kenyan tbh.
        > You remove the sides and bottom of the frame and the crop the comb to fit into
        > the hive.
        >
        > Phil Chandler has a video on YouTube showing how to do this. Visit the
        > biobees.com site if you haven't already.
        > I have decided to go Tanzanian with one of Beewrangler's designs. I will make
        > four hives this winter. My very first nucs are ready to pickup around May 10th.
        > I will get two and then split them if they are strong enough by the end of June.
        > If only we get as good a summer as this last one!!
        > Caryn
        >
        > --- In TopHive@yahoogroups.com, Rafael Montag <rmontag48@> wrote:
        > >
        > > Hi, Caryn:
        > > I'm rather new in the Bee Universe, so please forgive my lack of familiarity
        > > with the jargon.  What is chop-and-crop?
        > > Raf
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > ________________________________
        > > From: talktotheglock27 <caryn@>
        > > To: TopHive@yahoogroups.com
        > > Sent: Sun, November 14, 2010 2:51:33 PM
        > > Subject: [TopHive] Re: Brood and Honey Bar Sequence
        > >
        > >  
        > > When you say that your hive can accept Lang frames - do you mean that you can
        > > drop in an entire frame?? Or that you can accept a chop- and- crop??
        > > The reason I ask is that I have Lang nucs ordered from Kirk webster and I will
        >
        > > need to either chopncrop or build a Tanzanian top bar hive.
        > > Any suggestions??
        > > Caryn
        > >
        > >
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        > >
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