Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Bees here today gone tomorrow

Expand Messages
  • txbee76
    Installed my first colony on Friday! Everything was absolutely perfect. We got a high wind up the hill on Sunday night that tore the roof off of my hive along
    Message 1 of 7 , May 27, 2010
      Installed my first colony on Friday! Everything was absolutely perfect. We got a high wind up the hill on Sunday night that tore the roof off of my hive along with 3 top bars. Discovered a small cluster inside NW corner of hive and a small cluster on the outside wall immediately on the same side. replaced the bars reattached the roof replaced the syrup can that came with the bees and hoped for the best. By Tuesday the hive still had some activity and warned me off. But it appears to be a tiny group. By Wednesday and Thursday (today) saw evidence of many bees at our pond, flowers, vines and mesquites but can't tell where they are heading in the beeline. The hive isn't buzzing as merrily as it was on Sunday morning, but the bees are still protective. The queen was a R. Weaver, clipped and marked, though I understand that the nurse bees can pick her up and fly with her if necessary. Any suggestions? I plan to continue supplimenting feed in the hope of a miracle. I may try to capture and reintroduce workers from those foraging. advice welcomed
    • James Zitting
      That must have been some wind to blow your top bars off. Do you live in Wyoming? J I like to have a queen excluder cut down to cover the entrance until they
      Message 2 of 7 , May 27, 2010
        That must have been some wind to blow your top bars off. Do you live in
        Wyoming? J



        I like to have a queen excluder cut down to cover the entrance until they
        have brood. Check to see if you have a queen and a cluster, then work with
        what you have. Can you feed them honey rather than the refined substandard
        syrup? If you have foragers and a flow, you may not need to feed them.



        Let us know how it turns out.



        James A Zitting



        www.beelanding.com



        Become a fan of my facebook Page!
        http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=1465338161#!/pages/Bee-Landing/380313
        103678?ref=ts





        From: TopHive@yahoogroups.com [mailto:TopHive@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of
        txbee76
        Sent: Thursday, May 27, 2010 2:29 PM
        To: TopHive@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [TopHive] Bees here today gone tomorrow





        Installed my first colony on Friday! Everything was absolutely perfect. We
        got a high wind up the hill on Sunday night that tore the roof off of my
        hive along with 3 top bars. Discovered a small cluster inside NW corner of
        hive and a small cluster on the outside wall immediately on the same side.
        replaced the bars reattached the roof replaced the syrup can that came with
        the bees and hoped for the best. By Tuesday the hive still had some activity
        and warned me off. But it appears to be a tiny group. By Wednesday and
        Thursday (today) saw evidence of many bees at our pond, flowers, vines and
        mesquites but can't tell where they are heading in the beeline. The hive
        isn't buzzing as merrily as it was on Sunday morning, but the bees are still
        protective. The queen was a R. Weaver, clipped and marked, though I
        understand that the nurse bees can pick her up and fly with her if
        necessary. Any suggestions? I plan to continue supplimenting feed in the
        hope of a miracle. I may try to capture and reintroduce workers from those
        foraging. advice welcomed



        No virus found in this incoming message.
        Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
        Version: 9.0.819 / Virus Database: 271.1.1/2899 - Release Date: 05/27/10
        01:25:00



        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Mike V
        Worse. We live in Texas. :) It blew her top-cover off - which was weighted down with bricks and was aligned with some bolts (too short to put nuts on because
        Message 3 of 7 , May 27, 2010
          Worse. We live in Texas. :)

          It blew her top-cover off - which was weighted down with bricks and was aligned with some bolts (too short to put nuts on because we put shims underneath to separate the cover from the top-bars by a half inch or so), and then it blew those top-bars off.

          The sugar-water will stimulate comb-building for a new colony so there should be some comb in there already if the queen was present. It's not as good as honey, but better than nothing. I have seen queenless swarms just cluster up and do a whole lot of nothing tho - not even making any substantial comb. She does have a flow and once they've started settling in that will be their main food and they'll ignore the sugar-water.

          I live close enough to go take a peek but it'll be tomorrow evening before I can make it out there. It's promising that they're defensive - since defensive bees are defending a home and a queenless and combless box really isn't a home, so there's always hope.

          Be well,
          Mike
          --
          Zone 8, Texas
          http://www.taroandti.com/ Exotic Plant Info and More...
          http://www.organichomesteading.com/ Organic Homesteading
          http://www.naturalbeefarm.com/ Mike's Bee Farm

          --- In TopHive@yahoogroups.com, "James Zitting" <james@...> wrote:
          >
          > That must have been some wind to blow your top bars off. Do you live in
          > Wyoming? J
          >
          >
          >
          > I like to have a queen excluder cut down to cover the entrance until they
          > have brood. Check to see if you have a queen and a cluster, then work with
          > what you have. Can you feed them honey rather than the refined substandard
          > syrup? If you have foragers and a flow, you may not need to feed them.
          >
          >
          >
          > Let us know how it turns out.
          >
          >
          >
          > James A Zitting
          >
          >
          >
          > www.beelanding.com
          >
          >
        • txbee76
          Thanks folks :) Told ya it was a windy hill:)I m optomistic tho I ll let you know how things go. Did see some foragers returning to the hive this late
          Message 4 of 7 , May 27, 2010
            Thanks folks :) Told ya it was a windy hill:)I'm optomistic tho I'll let you know how things go. Did see some foragers returning to the hive this late afternoon.
            Bee Blessed,
            Brenda

            --- In TopHive@yahoogroups.com, "Mike V" <mike@...> wrote:
            >
            > Worse. We live in Texas. :)
            >
            > It blew her top-cover off - which was weighted down with bricks and was aligned with some bolts (too short to put nuts on because we put shims underneath to separate the cover from the top-bars by a half inch or so), and then it blew those top-bars off.
            >
            > The sugar-water will stimulate comb-building for a new colony so there should be some comb in there already if the queen was present. It's not as good as honey, but better than nothing. I have seen queenless swarms just cluster up and do a whole lot of nothing tho - not even making any substantial comb. She does have a flow and once they've started settling in that will be their main food and they'll ignore the sugar-water.
            >
            > I live close enough to go take a peek but it'll be tomorrow evening before I can make it out there. It's promising that they're defensive - since defensive bees are defending a home and a queenless and combless box really isn't a home, so there's always hope.
            >
            > Be well,
            > Mike
            > --
            > Zone 8, Texas
            > http://www.taroandti.com/ Exotic Plant Info and More...
            > http://www.organichomesteading.com/ Organic Homesteading
            > http://www.naturalbeefarm.com/ Mike's Bee Farm
            >
            > --- In TopHive@yahoogroups.com, "James Zitting" <james@> wrote:
            > >
            > > That must have been some wind to blow your top bars off. Do you live in
            > > Wyoming? J
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > I like to have a queen excluder cut down to cover the entrance until they
            > > have brood. Check to see if you have a queen and a cluster, then work with
            > > what you have. Can you feed them honey rather than the refined substandard
            > > syrup? If you have foragers and a flow, you may not need to feed them.
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > Let us know how it turns out.
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > James A Zitting
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > www.beelanding.com
            > >
            > >
            >
          • txbee76
            ... Bee Blessed, Brenda
            Message 5 of 7 , May 28, 2010
              --- In TopHive@yahoogroups.com, "txbee76" <lindsey.brenda@...> wrote:
              >Well we checked on thebees this evening. Ihave bees! perhaps most of them have returned to the hive. They've built comb, they are foraging. I haven't seen the queen or eggs yet but I am hopefull
              Bee Blessed,
              Brenda
            • owlsplace
              That good news. Maybe stack some straw bales around that hive... :) Roger Sierra Nevadas
              Message 6 of 7 , May 28, 2010
                That good news. Maybe stack some straw bales around that hive... :)
                Roger
                Sierra Nevadas

                --- In TopHive@yahoogroups.com, "txbee76" <lindsey.brenda@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                >
                > --- In TopHive@yahoogroups.com, "txbee76" <lindsey.brenda@> wrote:
                > >Well we checked on thebees this evening. Ihave bees! perhaps most of them have returned to the hive. They've built comb, they are foraging. I haven't seen the queen or eggs yet but I am hopefull
                > Bee Blessed,
                > Brenda
                >
              • Michael Vanecek
                I would have expected more comb but for the fact that they got interrupted by the windstorm and the time it took for the stragglers to make it back home, and
                Message 7 of 7 , May 28, 2010
                  I would have expected more comb but for the fact that they got
                  interrupted by the windstorm and the time it took for the stragglers to
                  make it back home, and they may have spent some time trying to get the
                  queen to come out of the queen-excluder covered the entrance to go
                  elsewhere. Now that they've settled in on that hive as home it looks
                  like they're getting ready to do some serious building. One top-bar has
                  a nice comb being developed and there's serious festooning on another
                  top-bar and minor festooning on three or four top-bars on the other side
                  so it looks like several combs will come down pretty soon. The bars that
                  came off in the wind were in the center and it looks like the main
                  cluster was at the back so I'm hopeful that the queen was preserved. The
                  bees that were lost temporarily were those that left thru the missing
                  top-bars to see what was up and got blown downwind. It looks like they
                  made their way home - I would wager that most of the package is back at
                  the hive and working. Of course, it's also possible that when she saw
                  just a tiny cluster, most of the bees were hanging on a branch waiting
                  for the queen and finally returned to to the hive to get back to
                  business making comb. Either way, I would have to say a big WHEW. I did
                  grab the empty package-box just in case I need to shake a couple frames
                  of bees into it but I don't think it'll be necessary - in a couple of
                  weeks I expect to see several combs with brood.

                  Be well,
                  Mike

                  --
                  Zone 8, Texas
                  http://www.taroandti.com/ Exotic Plant Info and More...
                  http://groups.yahoo.com/group/organichomesteading/
                  http://www.naturalbeefarm.com/ Natural Beekeeping


                  On 05/28/2010 09:32 PM, txbee76 wrote:
                  >
                  > --- In TopHive@yahoogroups.com, "txbee76"<lindsey.brenda@...> wrote:
                  >
                  >> Well we checked on thebees this evening. Ihave bees! perhaps most of them have returned to the hive. They've built comb, they are foraging. I haven't seen the queen or eggs yet but I am hopefull
                  >>
                  > Bee Blessed,
                  > Brenda
                  >
                  >
                  >
                Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.