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gaps sealed with modeling clay

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  • walkeroftheearth
    Do others have difficulty with gaps in their top bar hives? I think our last hive failed from robbing. I just placed a swarm in our empty hive and noticed the
    Message 1 of 6 , May 3, 2010
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      Do others have difficulty with gaps in their top bar hives?
      I think our last hive failed from robbing.
      I just placed a swarm in our empty hive and noticed the bees using alternative entrances.
      So my son and I went out early and sealed the small gaps with modeling clay. It seems to have worked.
      We have the hive sealed down to only one entrace hole and 6 bars for now.
      And we gave them one small ziplock bag of sugar syrup to start.
      I don't want to crowd them, but I want it to be cozy for the comb drawing process.
      I really want them to stick around.
      Anyone have other suggestions for a best start?
      Juliana
    • txbee76
      Thats an interesting idea. Will the oil in the modeling clay cause a problem? It s generally petroleum based. I am having a bit of a problem with the bars
      Message 2 of 6 , May 3, 2010
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        Thats an interesting idea. Will the oil in the modeling clay cause a problem? It's generally petroleum based. I am having a bit of a problem with the bars sliding side to side. So, I added a short piece of bamboo skewer tacked into the hive side of the bar one inch from the side on each side. I hope this helps stabilize the bars and yet doesn't interfer with the bees (when I get them):-)
        --- In TopHive@yahoogroups.com, "walkeroftheearth" <walkeroftheearth@...> wrote:
        >
        > Do others have difficulty with gaps in their top bar hives?
        > I think our last hive failed from robbing.
        > I just placed a swarm in our empty hive and noticed the bees using alternative entrances.
        > So my son and I went out early and sealed the small gaps with modeling clay. It seems to have worked.
        > We have the hive sealed down to only one entrace hole and 6 bars for now.
        > And we gave them one small ziplock bag of sugar syrup to start.
        > I don't want to crowd them, but I want it to be cozy for the comb drawing process.
        > I really want them to stick around.
        > Anyone have other suggestions for a best start?
        > Juliana
        >
      • Gord Campbell
        The bees will propolize the living daylights out of the bars, so you won t have to worry about slippage at all. I swear you could glue elephants together if
        Message 3 of 6 , May 3, 2010
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          The bees will propolize the living daylights out of the bars, so you
          won't have to worry about slippage at all. I swear you could glue
          elephants together if you had enough propolis. ;-)

          On 05/03/2010 02:01 PM, txbee76 wrote:
          >
          >
          > Thats an interesting idea. Will the oil in the modeling clay cause a
          > problem? It's generally petroleum based. I am having a bit of a
          > problem with the bars sliding side to side. So, I added a short piece
          > of bamboo skewer tacked into the hive side of the bar one inch from
          > the side on each side. I hope this helps stabilize the bars and yet
          > doesn't interfer with the bees (when I get them):-)
          > --- In TopHive@yahoogroups.com <mailto:TopHive%40yahoogroups.com>,
          > "walkeroftheearth" <walkeroftheearth@...> wrote:
          > >
          > > Do others have difficulty with gaps in their top bar hives?
          > > I think our last hive failed from robbing.
          > > I just placed a swarm in our empty hive and noticed the bees using
          > alternative entrances.
          > > So my son and I went out early and sealed the small gaps with
          > modeling clay. It seems to have worked.
          > > We have the hive sealed down to only one entrace hole and 6 bars for
          > now.
          > > And we gave them one small ziplock bag of sugar syrup to start.
          > > I don't want to crowd them, but I want it to be cozy for the comb
          > drawing process.
          > > I really want them to stick around.
          > > Anyone have other suggestions for a best start?
          > > Juliana
          > >
          >
          >

          --
          Gord Campbell
          Beekeeper - Partner
          Seldom Fools Apiculture <http://sfapiculture.ca> 887 Plainview Place
          Kingston, ON K7P 2K3
          CANADA
          gord@... <mailto:gord@...>
          Phone: +1.613.530-5662

          Ontario's /first and only/ treatment-free commercial top-bar apiaries.



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Barry Jackson
          A swarm is well equipped for the move. They have enough fuel to start afresh, including wax building residue, so don t worry. Leave them bee for a week. I have
          Message 4 of 6 , May 3, 2010
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            A swarm is well equipped for the move. They have enough fuel to start
            afresh, including wax building residue, so don't worry. Leave them bee for a
            week. I have just had a swarm in a 5 bar TBH NUC and they had built comb
            (not fully) on all five bars in just 7 days enough for Queen to lay and they
            were foraging for pollen. I have just transferred into TBH and they seem
            happy. Half a litre of syrup stationed on roof has been untouched all week.
            Barry

            On 3 May 2010 16:35, walkeroftheearth <walkeroftheearth@...> wrote:

            >
            >
            > Do others have difficulty with gaps in their top bar hives?
            > I think our last hive failed from robbing.
            > I just placed a swarm in our empty hive and noticed the bees using
            > alternative entrances.
            > So my son and I went out early and sealed the small gaps with modeling
            > clay. It seems to have worked.
            > We have the hive sealed down to only one entrace hole and 6 bars for now.
            > And we gave them one small ziplock bag of sugar syrup to start.
            > I don't want to crowd them, but I want it to be cozy for the comb drawing
            > process.
            > I really want them to stick around.
            > Anyone have other suggestions for a best start?
            > Juliana
            >
            >
            >


            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • txbee76
            Thanks for the info that the bees will solve the problem with proplois. You know how newbies worry about things that will be handled perfectly by nature.
            Message 5 of 6 , May 3, 2010
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              Thanks for the info that the bees will solve the problem with proplois. You know how newbies worry about things that will be handled perfectly by nature.

              --- In TopHive@yahoogroups.com, Gord Campbell <gord@...> wrote:
              >
              > The bees will propolize the living daylights out of the bars, so you
              > won't have to worry about slippage at all. I swear you could glue
              > elephants together if you had enough propolis. ;-)
              >
              > On 05/03/2010 02:01 PM, txbee76 wrote:
              > >
              > >
              > > Thats an interesting idea. Will the oil in the modeling clay cause a
              >
            • Mike V
              Depends on where the gaps are. I ve used popsicle sticks and wood-glue to seal up gaps in the body itself. Not too worried about gaps between the top-bar -
              Message 6 of 6 , May 4, 2010
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                Depends on where the gaps are. I've used popsicle sticks and wood-glue to seal up gaps in the body itself. Not too worried about gaps between the top-bar - usually they're pretty tight when humidity is high and the bees seal up pretty good with propolis.

                When they draw completely the comb and have brood, open up the broodnest and move your follower board. Make sure you keep at least two brood-bars next to each other - don't isolate any single comb when opening up the broodnest. Also, bees make the straightest comb when the neighboring combs are straight, so choose those combs to put an empty top-bar between to build up lotsa straight combs. Of course, don't open it up too much. One or two empties until they get those mostly drawn out and ditto after that until the Spring buildup is over. After that they'll start focusing on storage so give them a bar or two at the back and as they've drawn those out another bar until they stop drawing the bars down and start filling the combs with honey. You probably won't fill up the hive this season - but next season they'll expand their broodnest significantly, seeing as they've already got lotsa brood-comb drawn from this season so the buildup will be much faster. Open it up the same way when they start filling up with brood and soforth. Get yourself a cold uncapping knife too - for cutting wall attachments. And don't go into the hive when it's hot out - only in the morning when it's still cool. At least until they've finished the comb and it's matured and stiffer - but even then mid-morning to early afternoon is about the best time to go into the hive anyway, earlier as it warms up so you don't have to deal with too much soft comb.

                Be well,
                Mike
                --
                Zone 8, Texas
                http://www.taroandti.com/ Exotic Plant Info and More...
                http://www.organichomesteading.com/ Organic Homesteading
                http://www.mjv.com/ Mike's Blog


                --- In TopHive@yahoogroups.com, "walkeroftheearth" <walkeroftheearth@...> wrote:
                >
                > Do others have difficulty with gaps in their top bar hives?
                > I think our last hive failed from robbing.
                > I just placed a swarm in our empty hive and noticed the bees using alternative entrances.
                > So my son and I went out early and sealed the small gaps with modeling clay. It seems to have worked.
                > We have the hive sealed down to only one entrace hole and 6 bars for now.
                > And we gave them one small ziplock bag of sugar syrup to start.
                > I don't want to crowd them, but I want it to be cozy for the comb drawing process.
                > I really want them to stick around.
                > Anyone have other suggestions for a best start?
                > Juliana
                >
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