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Re: windy locations

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  • aartiana
    I am not sure if that is too fast a wind, so I will let someone else answer that portion. In Montana, I understand the beekeepers used stacked haybales on the
    Message 1 of 6 , May 1, 2010
      I am not sure if that is too fast a wind, so I will let someone else answer that portion. In Montana, I understand the beekeepers used stacked haybales on the North and sometimes also the West side(s) of the hive, with pretty good success.
    • thebeemanuk
      Bees are NOT creatures of the plains or open highlands; they are forest dwellers.So I would advise a simple shelter that allows a flow of air and one that
      Message 2 of 6 , May 2, 2010
        Bees are NOT creatures of the plains or open highlands; they are forest dwellers.So I would advise a simple shelter that allows a flow of air and one that allows cold air to roll down the hill side. Even a simple trellis would suffice.Dont inadvertantly create a frost pocket by blocking the downwards fall of air ( like I once did!) as this will slow-down the spring build-up and possibly kill your bees.
        I built a trllis and grew blackberry up it and it sufficed. I am in the middle of England in the Derbyshire Dales at 650 feet above sea level and it gets more wet than cold (except this year...Brrrrrr).Just use as a guage how YOU feel in the cold or heat on your hill side and build your shelter accordingly. OR make a bee house on the same style as a barn that holds calves, plenty of air-flow but reduced draught ( the type of barn with vertical slatts). I hate draughts and so do cats so bees may well feel the same!
        Big Tone
        Matlock
        England
      • lindsey.brenda@rocketmail.com
        Thanks for the insight. I had talked with my husband about setting up a trellis and honeysuckle vine, or perhaps more of a plant gazebo with morning glories.
        Message 3 of 6 , May 2, 2010
          Thanks for the insight. I had talked with my husband about setting up a trellis and honeysuckle vine, or perhaps more of a plant gazebo with morning glories. The wind dies down for the most part during the brightest and hottest dry days of summer. N. Central Texas can get "mighty hot". So, shade will probably be as important an issue as wind break. The plant gazebo might help on both counts.
          I completed the TBH, we opted for 2x4's for the legs for added stability, and plan to order "survivor" bees from a source called Zia Bees. The apiary is in New Mexico, and the bees are acclimatized to our heat.
          I am discovering that there are some bee keepers out here, but, as I am new to the area it will take time to get to know everyone.
          Be Blessed,
        • OOWONBS@Netscape.net
          Snow fence? It s a lathe fence, with lathe skipping every other spot. A flat obstruction eddies, making wind behind it scouring and far worse than in front.
          Message 4 of 6 , May 3, 2010
            Snow fence? It's a lathe fence, with lathe skipping every other spot.
            A flat obstruction eddies, making wind behind it scouring and far
            worse than in front. Sorta a cheap chain link fence effect, but
            with lathe, every other slot.

            Any lil valley or swale (small depression, often used to hold water
            until soil can absorb it, would be an added benefit. bales. on end
            (staked down?!?) sound neat... spaced a foot apart??? Or,
            staggered so there's 18" between? (The mere pattern would
            sure help them find home from the skies... It's no fun, flying in
            bad weather AND having to read the map, homeward.)

            BillSF9c
          • txbee76
            A lathe fence sounds good It s somewhat like a trellis with vines on it. Just difussing the wind to make it pleasant, as well as providing a landmark. Is such
            Message 5 of 6 , May 4, 2010
              A lathe fence sounds good It's somewhat like a trellis with vines on it. Just difussing the wind to make it pleasant, as well as providing a landmark. Is such a highly visible landmark necessary?

              --- In TopHive@yahoogroups.com, OOWONBS@... wrote:
              >
              >
              > Snow fence? It's a lathe fence, with lathe skipping every other spot.
              > A flat obstruction eddies, making wind behind it scouring and far
              > worse than in front. Sorta a cheap chain link fence effect, but
              > with lathe,
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