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Re: [TopHive] Re: WAS: Introduction/NOW: Baseline hives

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  • Tom O'Brien
    http://longlangwithlegs.blogspot.com/2009_06_01_archive.html as the season progresses i ll have more to say on long langs.....they are v simple and easy to
    Message 1 of 29 , Jan 18, 2010
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      http://longlangwithlegs.blogspot.com/2009_06_01_archive.html

      as the season progresses i'll have more to say on long langs.....they are v
      simple and easy to work with

      t

      --------------------------------------------------
      From: "Christy Hemenway" <christy@...>
      Sent: Sunday, January 17, 2010 8:43 PM
      To: <TopHive@yahoogroups.com>
      Subject: Re: [TopHive] Re: WAS: Introduction/NOW: Baseline hives

      > Dan,
      >
      > You make a terrific point about the "marketing" and the baseline
      > concept. Since the Langstroth hive had been for long and long the
      > only commercially produced beehive - it became an accepted sort of
      > "standard equipment". When I began keeping bees, I too thought - this
      > is the way you keep bees.
      >
      > But as I sat in my first beekeeping class, I still had to wonder, and
      > finally I gathered up my courage and I asked out loud - timidly
      > raising my hand from the back of the class - "What did bees do before
      > we gave them wax foundation?" When I got crickets for a response -
      > that unsettled me. It unsettled me enough to make me search in
      > earnest for an alternative. And top bar hives, when I stumbled upon
      > them were definitely alternative. So alternative as to almost be
      > considered "crackpot" by beekeepers with years of experience. But it
      > made so much sense!
      >
      > And then I remembered that the more matter of fact you are about
      > something, the more matter of fact-ly people respond to it. And so I
      > matter-of-factly began beekeeping in top bar hives, and then I began
      > making top bar hives, and now I own a company that manufactures a top
      > bar hive kit, and it is the beginning of the same sort of thing that
      > L.L. Langstroth began and Charlie P. Dadant continued. Gold Star Top
      > Bar Hives are a "standard" - with identical, interchangeable parts,
      > and a reliable company to stand behind it, and soon we will find that
      > Langstroth equipment is no longer the only alternative.
      >
      > Because we are shifting the paradigm. And we are just in time.
      >
      > -- Christy Hemenway
      > GOLD STAR HONEYBEES
      > "It's not about the honey, Honey - it's about the bees!"
      > 207-449-1121
      > www.goldstarhoneybees.com
      >
      > Gold Star Honeybees is based in Bath, Maine and is recognized as a
      > Green Business by the Green Business Network
      > www.greenamericatoday.org
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > On Jan 17, 2010, at 12:13 PM, Dan wrote:
      >
      >> Hello Christy, et al;
      >>
      >> You bring up an interesting point about whether Langstroth hives are
      >> a benchmark, baseline, standard, or something, to which other
      >> methods of beekeeping is compared. I kind of believe that it is. Let
      >> me explain.
      >>
      >> Up until relatively recently, say the past three or four years, I
      >> didn't realize that there were other ways to hive bees, at least
      >> here in the US.
      >> My grandfather had bees millenia ago, at least to me, and they were
      >> Langs...at least from the photos I saw of them. When learning about
      >> beekeeping and honey production in elementary school, and even in
      >> high school biology classes, it is the Langstroth hive that is used
      >> as the standard example. All of the commercial hives I have seen are
      >> Langs. When comb honey is bought, it is in frames that come from
      >> Langstroth hives, etc., etc., and so on.
      >>
      >> It seems that Mr Dadant, and others did a very great job of
      >> marketing these hives, and this way of beekeeping. So in my opinion,
      >> yes, Langstroth hives are kind of a standard, or baseline..whether
      >> real or percieved, that all other ways of beekeeping are compared
      >> to. TBH and Warre have always been sort of a novelty, at least for
      >> me, until I found more about them via the internet. Now I see TBH
      >> and Warre info all over the net.
      >>
      >> As you say, yes, why learn to keep bees via Langstroth hives, then
      >> unlearn it to learn other ways to keep bees. However, I do believe
      >> that most folks have a mental picture of a Lang hive when they first
      >> think of beekeeping.
      >>
      >> Luckily, today, there is more info on other hive styles, and when
      >> beginning to keep bees, one can start with a TBH or other style
      >> hive, and start learning that way, instead of relearning from what
      >> was learned by studying the Langstroth way of doing things.
      >>
      >> With the info that is now available on internet about TBH
      >> beekeeping, there is no reason to learn Lang first. Thanks for
      >> bringing this up, and for the links. They are great, and I have been
      >> to them many times.
      >>
      >> Stay warm,
      >>
      >> Dan Harriman
      >> Tyler Texas
      >>
      >> If at first you don't succeed, maybe you shouldn't try sky diving!
      >>
      >> --- On Sun, 1/17/10, Christy Hemenway
      >> <christy@...> wrote:
      >>
      >> > Hi Jimmy --
      >> >
      >> > It's odd to me how many people seem to think that
      >> > Langstroth is some
      >> > sort of baseline or benchmark. My thought is that if
      >> > you *begin* with
      >> > top bar hives, you don't have to learn, and then UNlearn
      >> > how to
      >> > manipulate Langstroth equipment and its accompanying
      >> > mindset.
      >> >
      >> > For information and research -- www.biobees.com is Phil
      >> > Chandler's
      >> > site (you've probably been there by now!) and he has
      >> > written a great
      >> > book on TBH call The Barefoot Beekeeper.
      >> >
      >> > And another terrific resource is Michael Bush's website at
      >> > www.bushfarms.com
      >> > . There is more information available there (and for
      >> > free) about all
      >> > things bee than you can shake a stick at.
      >> >
      >> > Have a great time - you will love keeping bees.
      >> >
      >> > -- Christy Hemenway
      >>
      >>
      >>
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >
      >
      > ------------------------------------
      >
      > The group archive and other pages can be accessed at
      > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TopHive
      > Yahoo! Groups Links
      >
      >
      >
      >
    • DonnaC
      Thank you for allowing me to join your group, my name is Donna and I live in KY. I have wanted to get involved in beekeeping for a long time but it seemed so
      Message 2 of 29 , Jul 13, 2012
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        Thank you for allowing me to join your group, my name is Donna and I live in KY. I have wanted to get involved in beekeeping for a long time but it seemed so complicated. Recently I heard about the top bar beehive and became quite intrigued. So I just finished building one, it is too late in the year to get bees, I have checked all over our area, but next year I hope to get some. I am interested in learning everthing I can about the hive and taking care of bees.
        Thank you again,
        Donna
      • Robbie Mabry
        Hi Donna, This is a great hobby, but I will warn you that beekeeping is like drugs, you can t get enough. I have been keeping bees for about 30 years and just
        Message 3 of 29 , Jul 13, 2012
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          Hi Donna,
          This is a great hobby, but I will warn you that beekeeping is like drugs,
          you can't get enough. I have been keeping bees for about 30 years and
          just built my first TBH this summer. The folks on this site really helped
          take the pressure off me and got me on the right road. Welcome to a great
          hobby.

          Robbie
          Melbourne, Arkansas

          On Fri, Jul 13, 2012 at 6:25 AM, DonnaC <dnnconvery@...> wrote:

          > **
          >
          >
          > Thank you for allowing me to join your group, my name is Donna and I live
          > in KY. I have wanted to get involved in beekeeping for a long time but it
          > seemed so complicated. Recently I heard about the top bar beehive and
          > became quite intrigued. So I just finished building one, it is too late in
          > the year to get bees, I have checked all over our area, but next year I
          > hope to get some. I am interested in learning everthing I can about the
          > hive and taking care of bees.
          > Thank you again,
          > Donna
          >
          >
          >


          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Donna Convery
          Thank you Robbie, I am sure that I am going to have fun, since I love to learn new things. How do you think the TBH compares to the standard beehive? Donna ...
          Message 4 of 29 , Jul 13, 2012
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            Thank you Robbie, I am sure that I am going to have fun, since I love to learn new things. How do you think the TBH compares to the standard beehive?
            Donna


            >________________________________
            > From: Robbie Mabry <robbie46@...>
            >To: TopHive@yahoogroups.com
            >Sent: Friday, July 13, 2012 7:45 AM
            >Subject: Re: [TopHive] Introduction
            >
            >Hi Donna,
            >This is a great hobby, but I will warn you that beekeeping is like drugs,
            >you can't get enough.  I have been keeping bees for about 30 years and
            >just built my first TBH this summer.  The folks on this site really helped
            >take the pressure off me and got me on the right road.  Welcome to a great
            >hobby.
            >
            >Robbie
            >Melbourne, Arkansas
            >
            >On Fri, Jul 13, 2012 at 6:25 AM, DonnaC <dnnconvery@...> wrote:
            >
            >> **
            >>
            >>
            >> Thank you for allowing me to join your group, my name is Donna and I live
            >> in KY. I have wanted to get involved in beekeeping for a long time but it
            >> seemed so complicated. Recently I heard about the top bar beehive and
            >> became quite intrigued. So I just finished building one, it is too late in
            >> the year to get bees, I have checked all over our area, but next year I
            >> hope to get some. I am interested in learning everthing I can about the
            >> hive and taking care of bees.
            >> Thank you again,
            >> Donna
            >>
            >> 
            >>
            >
            >
            >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            >
            >
            >
            >------------------------------------
            >
            >The group archive and other pages can be accessed at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TopHive
            >Yahoo! Groups Links
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            >

            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • Robbie Mabry
            I don t expect to get as much honey, but much more wax. I have found out it requires more fussing around, but that s why I keep bees. I would advise wearing
            Message 5 of 29 , Jul 13, 2012
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              I don't expect to get as much honey, but much more wax. I have found out
              it requires more fussing around, but that's why I keep bees. I would
              advise wearing a bee suit until you get relaxed with them then you will
              know what you can and can't do without protection. I am not to one to talk
              about the TBH as this is my first season with them. I expect some of the
              other folks will be giving you much better advise than I.

              On Fri, Jul 13, 2012 at 7:25 AM, Donna Convery <dnnconvery@...> wrote:

              > **
              >
              >
              > Thank you Robbie, I am sure that I am going to have fun, since I love to
              > learn new things. How do you think the TBH compares to the standard beehive?
              > Donna
              >
              > >________________________________
              > > From: Robbie Mabry <robbie46@...>
              > >To: TopHive@yahoogroups.com
              > >Sent: Friday, July 13, 2012 7:45 AM
              > >Subject: Re: [TopHive] Introduction
              > >
              > >Hi Donna,
              > >This is a great hobby, but I will warn you that beekeeping is like drugs,
              > >you can't get enough. I have been keeping bees for about 30 years and
              > >just built my first TBH this summer. The folks on this site really helped
              > >take the pressure off me and got me on the right road. Welcome to a great
              > >hobby.
              > >
              > >Robbie
              > >Melbourne, Arkansas
              > >
              > >On Fri, Jul 13, 2012 at 6:25 AM, DonnaC <dnnconvery@...> wrote:
              > >
              > >> **
              > >>
              > >>
              > >> Thank you for allowing me to join your group, my name is Donna and I
              > live
              > >> in KY. I have wanted to get involved in beekeeping for a long time but
              > it
              > >> seemed so complicated. Recently I heard about the top bar beehive and
              > >> became quite intrigued. So I just finished building one, it is too late
              > in
              > >> the year to get bees, I have checked all over our area, but next year I
              > >> hope to get some. I am interested in learning everthing I can about the
              > >> hive and taking care of bees.
              > >> Thank you again,
              > >> Donna
              > >>
              > >>
              > >>
              > >
              > >
              > >[Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >------------------------------------
              > >
              > >The group archive and other pages can be accessed at
              > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TopHive
              > >Yahoo! Groups Links
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              >
              >
              >


              [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
            • Rafael Montag
              Welcome.   Raf Hyattstown, MD From: DonnaC To: TopHive@yahoogroups.com Sent: Friday, July 13, 2012 7:25 AM Subject: [TopHive]
              Message 6 of 29 , Jul 13, 2012
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                Welcome.
                 
                Raf
                Hyattstown, MD

                From: DonnaC <dnnconvery@...>
                To: TopHive@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Friday, July 13, 2012 7:25 AM
                Subject: [TopHive] Introduction


                 
                Thank you for allowing me to join your group, my name is Donna and I live in KY. I have wanted to get involved in beekeeping for a long time but it seemed so complicated. Recently I heard about the top bar beehive and became quite intrigued. So I just finished building one, it is too late in the year to get bees, I have checked all over our area, but next year I hope to get some. I am interested in learning everthing I can about the hive and taking care of bees.
                Thank you again,
                Donna




                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Jorg Kewisch
                Donna, Welcome to one of the greatest hobbies. I would like to send you back into the wood-workshop to build a second hive. It is recommended to start with two
                Message 7 of 29 , Jul 13, 2012
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                  Donna,

                  Welcome to one of the greatest hobbies. I would like to send you back
                  into the wood-workshop to build a second hive. It is recommended to
                  start with two to four hives. First, because you can compare them in
                  their development. Bee colonies are like siblings, they are all
                  different in temperament, health and production. One student from my
                  beginners class said: If I had started with just the rowdy colony I
                  would have quit. But the good colony showed me how things should be.

                  Second, a bee keeper sometimes takes from a strong hive to help a weaker
                  one overcome a problem. If a queen gets sick and dies the beekeeper can
                  give them a bar with eggs from the other hives so that they can make a
                  new queen.

                  The other thing I suggest is to go to your local bee keepers club
                  meeting and offer your help to an experienced beekeeper, so you can get
                  comfortable handling the bees with some guidance.

                  Jorg
                • P.H. Rankin Hansen
                  I ll second Jorg s suggestions. Another thing to watch out for, is beekeeper burnout . _D_o_n_ _t_ get above five hives the first three years. I ve seen it
                  Message 8 of 29 , Jul 13, 2012
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                    I'll second Jorg's suggestions.

                    Another thing to watch out for, is "beekeeper burnout". _D_o_n_'_t_ get
                    above five hives the first three years.

                    I've seen it far too often. Very often the first year or two is
                    successful and there are only minor problems. This really gives people
                    the beekeeping bug, which leads them to expand the number of hives. What
                    they don't have, is experience, so they cut corners, and when the
                    inevitable problems start showing up, they can be hit very hard, often
                    leading to burnout - in some cases, even severe stress. Very few of
                    those burnouts remain beekeepers after the fifth year. Limiting yourself
                    to five hives, lets you gain experience without overextending.

                    And _do_ get your self a _compatible_ mentor. Having a mentor, can be
                    very rewarding, lead you away from a _lot_ of mistakes, and lead to long
                    lasting friendships. But find someone compatible - many are locked in
                    their mind to doing things one way only, and that usually does not
                    include topbar hives.

                    --
                    venlig hilsen / best regards

                    Peter H. Rankin Hansen
                    Stjærvej 15, Storring
                    DK-8464 Galten
                    Danmark

                    (+45) 7586 1688 / (+45) 2211 9611

                    Si vis pacem, para bellum - if you want peace, prepare for war.

                    Den 13-07-2012 15:24, Jorg Kewisch skrev:
                    > Donna,
                    >
                    > Welcome to one of the greatest hobbies. I would like to send you back
                    > into the wood-workshop to build a second hive. It is recommended to
                    > start with two to four hives. First, because you can compare them in
                    > their development. Bee colonies are like siblings, they are all
                    > different in temperament, health and production. One student from my
                    > beginners class said: If I had started with just the rowdy colony I
                    > would have quit. But the good colony showed me how things should be.
                    >
                    > Second, a bee keeper sometimes takes from a strong hive to help a weaker
                    > one overcome a problem. If a queen gets sick and dies the beekeeper can
                    > give them a bar with eggs from the other hives so that they can make a
                    > new queen.
                    >
                    > The other thing I suggest is to go to your local bee keepers club
                    > meeting and offer your help to an experienced beekeeper, so you can get
                    > comfortable handling the bees with some guidance.
                    >
                    > Jorg
                    >
                    >
                    > ------------------------------------
                    >
                    > The group archive and other pages can be accessed at http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TopHive
                    > Yahoo! Groups Links
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    >
                  • elegans@aol.com
                    Hey Donna! Everyone has said valuable suggestion. Wouldn t take any away. Would add that you are in for a terrific ride. Try not to use smoke when you go in to
                    Message 9 of 29 , Jul 13, 2012
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                      Hey Donna!

                      Everyone has said valuable suggestion. Wouldn't take any away. Would add
                      that you are in for a terrific ride. Try not to use smoke when you go in to
                      inspect. start from the back end, and one frame at a time move forward
                      slowly and deliberately and you will see how tolerant bees can bee.

                      As for stocking with a colony.... There is still a lot of summer left, So I
                      would go ahead with the understanding that they may or may not build up
                      and get a good storage for the winter. You might get only a half build. But
                      there are follower boards you can use to get it cozy for the winter, and
                      entrance reducers and all, and insulation.... but you will get there as
                      needed. PLUS if the hive does fail to make it over the first winter, there will
                      be built out comb for a new colony and they will have a great start to next
                      summer. Join a local bee club if you can, to get camaraderie. Although not
                      many bee club folks are Top bar folks and they look at you as crazy. But
                      they might be able to get you a captured swarm to start with!!!!!!

                      Stay with the group here, there is a whole lot of experience. A good web
                      site that I like is Michael Bush's site _http://www.bushfarms.com/bees.htm_
                      (http://www.bushfarms.com/bees.htm) He's got lots of good info. Though
                      primarily a Lang guy, he did build a horizontal Lang which is really a modified
                      Top Bar.

                      Good Luck,

                      George

                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • P.H. Rankin Hansen
                      And don t let yourself get confused. Whenever there s four beekeepers present, there s usually five opinions about how to do something - and most likely,
                      Message 10 of 29 , Jul 13, 2012
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                        And don't let yourself get confused. Whenever there's four beekeepers
                        present, there's usually five opinions about how to do something - and
                        most likely, they'll all work.

                        --
                        venlig hilsen / best regards

                        Peter H. Rankin Hansen
                        Stjærvej 15, Storring
                        DK-8464 Galten
                        Danmark

                        (+45) 7586 1688 / (+45) 2211 9611

                        Si vis pacem, para bellum - if you want peace, prepare for war.
                      • Donna Convery
                        Jorg and group, I have a second hive cut out, I just need to make my bars and roof. But I didn t think it was a good idea to do a second one right away, so now
                        Message 11 of 29 , Jul 13, 2012
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                          Jorg and group,
                          I have a second hive cut out, I just need to make my bars and roof. But I didn't think it was a good idea to do a second one right away, so now I will get back to putting that one together. I have to say thanks to everyone for all the great information.I can't believe how welcoming and helpful everyone is. I am going back over each response and write down the suggestions then get started on them. We have a local beekeeping group, but they are very anti top bar hives. I have my heart set on the TBH, so I haven't been going back. But I think I will now. We have a meeting next Thursday night. Gosh, I sure appreciate all the ideas.
                          Donna


                          >________________________________
                          > From: Jorg Kewisch <jorg@...>
                          >To: TopHive@yahoogroups.com
                          >Sent: Friday, July 13, 2012 9:24 AM
                          >Subject: Re: [TopHive] Introduction
                          >
                          >
                          >

                          >
                          >Donna,
                          >
                          >Welcome to one of the greatest hobbies. I would like to send you back
                          >into the wood-workshop to build a second hive. It is recommended to
                          >start with two to four hives. First, because you can compare them in
                          >their development. Bee colonies are like siblings, they are all
                          >different in temperament, health and production. One student from my
                          >beginners class said: If I had started with just the rowdy colony I
                          >would have quit. But the good colony showed me how things should be.
                          >
                          >Second, a bee keeper sometimes takes from a strong hive to help a weaker
                          >one overcome a problem. If a queen gets sick and dies the beekeeper can
                          >give them a bar with eggs from the other hives so that they can make a
                          >new queen.
                          >
                          >The other thing I suggest is to go to your local bee keepers club
                          >meeting and offer your help to an experienced beekeeper, so you can get
                          >comfortable handling the bees with some guidance.
                          >
                          >Jorg
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • Maureen Russell
                          Hi Donna I haven t really posted on this forum but wanted to welcome you because I have felt the same way about attending my local bee group. In fact the
                          Message 12 of 29 , Jul 13, 2012
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                            Hi Donna
                            I haven't really posted on this forum but wanted to welcome you because I have felt the same way about attending my local bee group. In fact the Florida beekeepers group didn't even want to respond toe when they heard I had top bar hives. I have inky been beekeeping since October but things are going well. I split my hives earlier in the year fro
                            Two to four. It took them awhile to become queen right with the weather but all is well now. They way we box our bees are different but how and what you look for is very much the same. Remember we are beekeepers not box keepers. Welcome to the group. If you need anything just give a shout!

                            Sent from my iPhone

                            On Jul 13, 2012, at 1:12 PM, Donna Convery <dnnconvery@...> wrote:

                            > Jorg and group,
                            > I have a second hive cut out, I just need to make my bars and roof. But I didn't think it was a good idea to do a second one right away, so now I will get back to putting that one together. I have to say thanks to everyone for all the great information.I can't believe how welcoming and helpful everyone is. I am going back over each response and write down the suggestions then get started on them. We have a local beekeeping group, but they are very anti top bar hives. I have my heart set on the TBH, so I haven't been going back. But I think I will now. We have a meeting next Thursday night. Gosh, I sure appreciate all the ideas.
                            > Donna
                            >
                            > >________________________________
                            > > From: Jorg Kewisch <jorg@...>
                            > >To: TopHive@yahoogroups.com
                            > >Sent: Friday, July 13, 2012 9:24 AM
                            > >Subject: Re: [TopHive] Introduction
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >Donna,
                            > >
                            > >Welcome to one of the greatest hobbies. I would like to send you back
                            > >into the wood-workshop to build a second hive. It is recommended to
                            > >start with two to four hives. First, because you can compare them in
                            > >their development. Bee colonies are like siblings, they are all
                            > >different in temperament, health and production. One student from my
                            > >beginners class said: If I had started with just the rowdy colony I
                            > >would have quit. But the good colony showed me how things should be.
                            > >
                            > >Second, a bee keeper sometimes takes from a strong hive to help a weaker
                            > >one overcome a problem. If a queen gets sick and dies the beekeeper can
                            > >give them a bar with eggs from the other hives so that they can make a
                            > >new queen.
                            > >
                            > >The other thing I suggest is to go to your local bee keepers club
                            > >meeting and offer your help to an experienced beekeeper, so you can get
                            > >comfortable handling the bees with some guidance.
                            > >
                            > >Jorg
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            > >
                            >
                            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            >
                            >


                            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                          • P.H. Rankin Hansen
                            ... hives. I have my heart set on the TBH, so I haven t been going back There s usually at least one with an open mind - mayhap even one who s been itching to
                            Message 13 of 29 , Jul 13, 2012
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                              > We have a local beekeeping group, but they are very anti top bar
                              hives. I have my heart set on the TBH, so I haven't been going back

                              There's usually at least one with an open mind - mayhap even one who's
                              been itching to try it him-/herself.

                              --
                              venlig hilsen / best regards

                              Peter H. Rankin Hansen
                              Stjærvej 15, Storring
                              DK-8464 Galten
                              Danmark

                              (+45) 7586 1688 / (+45) 2211 9611

                              Si vis pacem, para bellum - if you want peace, prepare for war.
                            • L. Carlson
                              My local club is also very langstroth-centric... but i have found a few TBH/Warre curiosity seekers and I just go for the general knoweledge questions ( things
                              Message 14 of 29 , Jul 13, 2012
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                                My local club is also very langstroth-centric... but i have found a few TBH/Warre curiosity seekers and I just go for the general knoweledge questions ( things that applies to all hives or I can adapt to my Warres)
                                 
                                there are some things that are universal to all hives weather/feeding/pest control etc.. how you handle may have to be altered a bit but you can get ideas...



                                From: P.H. Rankin Hansen <ping@...>
                                Subject: Re: [TopHive] Introduction
                                To: TopHive@yahoogroups.com
                                Date: Friday, July 13, 2012, 2:42 PM



                                 



                                > We have a local beekeeping group, but they are very anti top bar
                                hives. I have my heart set on the TBH, so I haven't been going back

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                              • Rachel
                                There are members of my local bee guild that have voiced dismay that a first-time beekeeper would have a top bar hive. Luckily we also have a strong contingent
                                Message 15 of 29 , Jul 13, 2012
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                                  There are members of my local bee guild that have voiced dismay that a
                                  first-time beekeeper would have a top bar hive. Luckily we also have a
                                  strong contingent of top bar and "all - natural" bee keepers. Put us all in
                                  a room together and it's a more than lively discussion- because at the end
                                  of the day we're all there for the bees!
                                  Rachel

                                  On Fri, Jul 13, 2012 at 12:42 PM, P.H. Rankin Hansen <ping@...>wrote:

                                  > **
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > > We have a local beekeeping group, but they are very anti top bar
                                  > hives. I have my heart set on the TBH, so I haven't been going back
                                  >
                                  > There's usually at least one with an open mind - mayhap even one who's
                                  > been itching to try it him-/herself.
                                  >
                                  > --
                                  > venlig hilsen / best regards
                                  >
                                  > Peter H. Rankin Hansen
                                  > Stj�rvej 15, Storring
                                  > DK-8464 Galten
                                  > Danmark
                                  >
                                  > (+45) 7586 1688 / (+45) 2211 9611
                                  >
                                  > Si vis pacem, para bellum - if you want peace, prepare for war.
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >


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                                • elegans@aol.com
                                  In a message dated 7/13/2012 12:44:11 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time, maureen.schoolcraftrussell@gmail.com writes ... Remember we are beekeepers not box keepers.
                                  Message 16 of 29 , Jul 13, 2012
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                                    In a message dated 7/13/2012 12:44:11 P.M. Pacific Daylight Time,
                                    maureen.schoolcraftrussell@... writes
                                    :

                                    "Remember we are beekeepers not box keepers. "


                                    Nicely put!!!!!!!!

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