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Re: [TopHive] Re: alternative materials for making hives

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  • Ben P
    Vicky, I envy you your swarms:) David Heaf just updated his site with feeder pictures, http://warre.biobees.com/feeders.htm, shows a few options. It s a good
    Message 1 of 28 , Oct 1, 2009
      Vicky,
      I envy you your swarms:) David Heaf just updated his site with feeder
      pictures, http://warre.biobees.com/feeders.htm, shows a few options. It's a
      good site for general info.
      Ben


      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
    • Victoria Hobbs
      Ben, I like David s pictures! Jazzy colour scheme too - wonder what bee-safe paints he used! Illuminates the feeder issue. I keep looking ad David s bit of the
      Message 2 of 28 , Oct 1, 2009
        Ben, I like David's pictures! Jazzy colour scheme too - wonder what bee-safe paints he used! Illuminates the feeder issue. I keep looking ad David's bit of the site given that he is based in the UK - shame Wales is a bit different from a London environment from a bee perspective - though I am told that honey produced in London is really high quality generally.... Wales still sounds more bee friendly somehow! Thanks for letting me know about the update.
         
        Vicky

        --- On Thu, 1/10/09, Ben P <benjamin.primrose@...> wrote:


        From: Ben P <benjamin.primrose@...>
        Subject: Re: [TopHive] Re: alternative materials for making hives
        To: TopHive@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Thursday, 1 October, 2009, 3:19 PM


        Vicky,
            I envy you your swarms:)  David Heaf just updated his site with feeder
        pictures, http://warre.biobees.com/feeders.htm, shows a few options.  It's a
        good site for general info.
        Ben


        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]



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        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • OOWONBS@Netscape.net
        Ben, Tom, Vicki, all; great inputs of late. Plywood may split all over if non-marine grade plywood, which is costly and generally not very available, esp in
        Message 3 of 28 , Oct 1, 2009
          Ben, Tom, Vicki, all; great inputs of late.

          Plywood may split all over if non-marine grade plywood, which
          is costly and generally not very available, esp in pieces or
          sections that are pieces cut off the 4x8 sheets. In he US we
          have stores that sell 4x4 and 2x2 and even 2x2 ft pieces/pcs.

          Folks hate having paint inside a hive, and a plywood floor can,
          in some seasons in some climates, get very wet. Some Warre'
          & other top bars and many Langs add a bottom screen.

          If so, and if your paint issue was not offgassing, just contact,
          then they would not be ON the floor, and you could paint it or
          wax treat it with hot wax or paraffin.

          For other outdoor uses, I like epoxy resin. (Think, fiberglass
          like a boat, but w/o the glass fibers.) This does offgass, but
          I haven't had time to research how bad it is over time. it is
          a 2 part, you add a catalyst and you have 15 minutes to
          2 hrs to apply it... depending on how much you know how
          to manipulate the catalyst and the weather. It sure is purdy.
          The light amber clear 9you can get pigments) let's the wood
          show through. It would sure waterproof a plywood edge or
          floor, or a roof... ;>) And it's essentially a glue, so a painted
          joint would be stronger, before or after assembly. there
          are 2 common sources (mfrs) I know.

          Warre' hive deoth is not critical... but a deeper box/body
          lends itself less well to flexibility of swapping out a box.
          You have to wait longer for it to fill, and you harvest more,
          leaving less therefore, when you harvest.

          BUT, you could pop the top and just steal a couple top bars,
          if you do not nail the top bars in place as Warre' did. the
          US frowns on fixed frames/top bars. They are considered
          unsafe tio the bee community at large as they cannot be
          as readily removed for close inspection by you or an
          inspector.

          The original was made to be an 18 liter box, with a volume
          of 2 quarts shy of 10 gallons. This was (and potentially
          valuable info for non-Warre's) because Warre', who had
          tens of hives per dozens of each hive type with which to
          study, and being a monk, (Abby) he had time on his hands,
          (no giggles, here plz,) and observed that this was the
          minimum best allowable size for a healthy colony.

          I've kind of forgotten the volumes of most Trapezoidal
          Top Bar hives, or Kenyans, or Langs. Anyone? Or handy
          dimensions? ANyway, with smaller (~8 1/4" tall) Warre'
          bodies, youi can swap out more often, and steal honey
          more often, doing less each time. I believe I recall that
          a full box is 25KG or 50 lbs +/-. As I approach 60 and
          feel much younger, I still realize that I will appreciate
          less weight, regardless of the neat lifts you can make.

          Wow. 1x1 ft inside and 16 3/4" tall, inside, for the old
          1-box original prototype Warre', which is 16 1'2 inches
          in the 2-box version. (Minus the insulating roof/etc.)
          That is what he considered a minimum sustainable hive.
          barely enough for brood and THEIR own honey stores.

          It is interesting to consider, esp as compared to a
          practical hive, where we need more room so they can
          store enough so we can take some, a box at a time.

          Something to consider Vicki, as to hive depth, Lang users
          use mediums or shallows for honey "supers." Deeps hold
          the brood, and are ~ 9" tall. But the brood stays there.

          In Warre', brood is as in a tree cavity. It continually
          hatches and moves downward as honey backfills way
          up, where the older lain eggs hatch out. The bottom
          box does not stay put. It moves upward. Smaller honey
          boxes can be harvested more often. Are lighter. Too
          small (short) has many top bars to impede bees. But
          it has been done. My compromise is a top bar that is
          more vertical than the traditional design.

          Taking less at a time is better for the bees. When the
          boxes get too shallow, some feel that the bees have
          to go through too many top bars, something that nature
          puts few of in tree cavities. (Some beeks are "going
          native." No top bars. Once in a while, a "spale." It's
          like 1 top bar, but only 1/8th as many, and at odd
          varying angles. Less to impede the bees, but some
          occasional support.

          BillSF9c
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