Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

re help comb falling

Expand Messages
  • frogkailo
    Thank you Scot for your help, I just want to add some more questions.This hive was my strongest hive and it is now in really bad situation ,with many dead
    Message 1 of 2 , Aug 8, 2004
    • 0 Attachment
      Thank you Scot for your help,

      I just want to add some more questions.This hive was my strongest hive
      and it is now in really bad situation ,with many dead bees.I am pretty
      scared now to touch my other hives ,and make another disaster.
      My next hive has also made some nice looking comb,but this time it is
      nice looking and the comb is attached to the top bar with full lenght
      (sorry for my bad english),but again it is attached somewhat on sides
      of the hive.
      Can I cut the sides that are attached to the hive without the fear
      that the combs will fall down latter?Especially since the combs in
      this hive are almost big as the hive ,its really big?
      The bees tend to conect two combs on the ends near the hive walls.Is
      it wrong ,I have only cut them loose slowly ,and later I have put them
      back?Is this wrong,should I maybee ,take out the comb that is slightly
      bended,and give them top bars ,until they make nice straight line
      combs(is this posible anyway?)


      !I am afraid the bees will swarm,if I dont react soon.I have to go to
      my appiary tommorow and make some moves,no matter what hapens,will
      have to experiment.I really wish this tbh was a good idea,I really
      like the concept and the simplicity of it.
      Just a short question on something else,how are you treting varoa?
      Would I be better if I move my hives to a dry and not cold
      basement?Would this give more chances to my bees to survive this first
      winter?
      I have lost my package bees when I first bought my bees this summer,I
      have lost 6 of 10 packages.One strong hive had a disaster wiht comb
      falling,two are moderate ,and one is very small with only one top bar
      populated.

      Not to forget to said later,I have made 10 hives last year,the
      dimension are something like 90 cm x 45 cm x 28 cm ,it is not a
      trapezoid shape ,it is like a standard langstrot hive.I wanted to be
      able to use ordinary frames if this whole idea is a mess ( like some
      bad experiences suggest it really is).Also I have a fear from the
      winter,how will the bees survive,I have read in the books that bees
      like to move vertically and not horizontaly.

      regards,Sasha from Serbia,

      PS:it is a excellent idea to make a beekeeping wiki page,I hope I will
      contribute ,with my small experiences.It would be good to have some
      explanation for starting with tbh - how to start with packagee bees
      and tbh.And many other things.
    • Scot Mc Pherson
      ... I think the dimensions you describe below are too large. Quite a few people have tried this for the very same reasons you have. Interchangability with
      Message 2 of 2 , Aug 8, 2004
      • 0 Attachment
        On Sunday 08 August 2004 06:05 pm, frogkailo wrote:
        > Thank you Scot for your help,
        >
        > I just want to add some more questions.This hive was my strongest hive
        > and it is now in really bad situation ,with many dead bees.I am pretty
        > scared now to touch my other hives ,and make another disaster.
        > My next hive has also made some nice looking comb,but this time it is
        > nice looking and the comb is attached to the top bar with full lenght
        > (sorry for my bad english),but again it is attached somewhat on sides
        > of the hive.
        > Can I cut the sides that are attached to the hive without the fear
        > that the combs will fall down latter?Especially since the combs in
        > this hive are almost big as the hive ,its really big?

        I think the dimensions you describe below are too large. Quite a few people
        have tried this for the very same reasons you have. Interchangability with
        langstroth equipment. It does nt work in practice though. Hives built to
        langstroth dimensions seem to fail too often to call the design a success.

        I do not think it is safe to simply cut away attachments unless you know it is
        safe to do so. The brood chamber is the safest place to do comb trimming
        because the comb is rigid. New comb and honey comb though is soft and it may
        not hold very well after cutting away the support mechanisms ( attachments )

        > The bees tend to conect two combs on the ends near the hive walls.Is
        > it wrong ,I have only cut them loose slowly ,and later I have put them
        > back?Is this wrong,should I maybee ,take out the comb that is slightly
        > bended,and give them top bars ,until they make nice straight line
        > combs(is this posible anyway?)

        Cut away the bend ends of the combs, and if you have some, place the combs
        between two stright combs. They will build out striaght. Once you have a hive
        trained well, the comb is easy to maintain in striaghtness. Once comb has
        been built poorly though, it is often a struggle to train them back to
        building stright combs again. This is because with striaght combs, you can
        alway coach the bees to build more striaght combs by placing empty bars
        between two perfect combs. The comb that develops between them will also be
        perfect. If you do not have two combs to give the bees as guideline, they
        have nothing but what they have already to guide them. It can be a nuisance.

        >
        >
        > !I am afraid the bees will swarm,if I dont react soon.

        WHy are you afraid of swarming? Are there swarming signs?

        > I have to go to
        > my appiary tommorow and make some moves,no matter what hapens,will
        > have to experiment.I really wish this tbh was a good idea,I really
        > like the concept and the simplicity of it.

        It is a good concept, and you SHOUDL experiment, but understand that a lot of
        us have already experimented and the more successful designs are always
        smaller than the unsuccessful ones. I like my design best from 2 points of
        view. It is designed strictly to be of mechanically sound dimensions ( for
        comb engineering ) and also the readily available materials in this country
        are friendly to the dimensions so I have much less cutting of wood than some
        other designs might have. The pieces of lumber I need to purchase are 1x12,
        1x8 for the body and 2x4s for the top bars which I rip several bars from a
        single piece of wood. I have little cutting to perform, because the wood is
        already the size I need. I only cut the angles into the bottom board so the
        sides are flush with the surface and not providing spaces for pests to hide
        in.

        > Just a short question on something else,how are you treting varoa?
        I do not treat for pests. If a hive because infested, then nature has found a
        weakness in that line of bees and nature is doing her job of removing the
        weakness from the genetic pool. I haven't lost a colony yet to pests or
        disease though.

        > Would I be better if I move my hives to a dry and not cold
        > basement?Would this give more chances to my bees to survive this first
        > winter?

        This is hard for me to say, I do not kow serbia at all. But I don't think
        cellar wintering is a good idea. THis is a practice normally done in the very
        extreme cold places.

        > I have lost my package bees when I first bought my bees this summer,I
        > have lost 6 of 10 packages.One strong hive had a disaster wiht comb
        > falling,two are moderate ,and one is very small with only one top bar
        > populated.
        >
        > Not to forget to said later,I have made 10 hives last year,the
        > dimension are something like 90 cm x 45 cm x 28 cm ,it is not a
        > trapezoid shape ,it is like a standard langstrot hive.I wanted to be
        > able to use ordinary frames if this whole idea is a mess ( like some
        > bad experiences suggest it really is).Also I have a fear from the
        > winter,how will the bees survive,I have read in the books that bees
        > like to move vertically and not horizontaly.

        The bees don't necessarily like to MOVE vertically, but they are more
        comfortable with honey above their heads. When teh TopBarHive matures after a
        year or two, you find the brood nest does use the whol comb anymore, you will
        find several inches of honey above the brood nest and the nest will extend a
        bit further back into the hive. They will put surplus anywhere, they just
        want to have some honey above the brood.

        >
        > regards,Sasha from Serbia,
        >
        > PS:it is a excellent idea to make a beekeeping wiki page,I hope I will
        > contribute ,with my small experiences.It would be good to have some
        > explanation for starting with tbh - how to start with packagee bees
        > and tbh.And many other things.

        Thank you, I hope you get the time to contribute.

        --
        Scot Mc Pherson
        scot@...
        Sarasota, Florida, USA
        MSN: behomet@... AIM: scotlfs ICQ: 342349
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.