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Positioning of TBH in the Yard & other Considerations

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  • David
    Hello, My names David Sneiders & am in southern California. Community gardening & basic wood working keeps me busy these days & now trying to help friend &
    Message 1 of 9 , Aug 1, 2008
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      Hello,

      My names David Sneiders & am in southern California. Community
      gardening & basic wood working keeps me busy these days & now trying to
      help friend & myself set up a hive as been many swarms here in southern
      California earlier this Spring/summer.

      Just finished contructing my 11" bottom-width x 17-5/16" top-width x 11-
      9/16" height x 41" (exterior) TBH for friend. Has 10 - 1-1/4"x 16"
      potential brood bars & 16 - 1-1/2"x 16" potential H. comb bars. w/
      reducer makes 27 total bars (used reclaimed wood & some redwood from
      hive tops). I understood that making the whole hive available at once
      makes for challenge for bees to cool & or heat at first so is prudent
      to start w/ less bars at first & set reducer. How many & what
      distribution of bar sequence is good to start? Also didn't include
      landing edge on front bottom entrance as read hive beetles are more
      likely to find easier entry & skunks like as buffet board. Or would
      landing be more productive in your experience?

      In my excitement I realize am jumping the gun & first must get more
      details on location details & position w/ hive entrance consideration.
      Also its late in season & bees if don't luckily take up residence must
      go out & capture swarm which I've seen one advertized on Craigs, but
      not quite ready yet for, so hopefully someone near or more prepared can
      aquire if nearby to San fernando Valley in Woodland Hils:

      http://losangeles.craigslist.org/sfv/zip/777919664.html .

      Gotta go make delivery, will check back soon.

      Cheers, David in San Gabriel Valley, southern Calif.
    • kengilbert12
      Hello David, Congratulations on completing your project. I live in the west side of Los Angeles, and built and started my hive in May. I got a swarm from a bee
      Message 2 of 9 , Aug 1, 2008
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        Hello David,
        Congratulations on completing your project.
        I live in the west side of Los Angeles, and built and started my
        hive in May. I got a swarm from a bee removal expert in your area
        for $40.
        If you like I can give you his contact off-line.
        I have a follower board inside, reducing the hive cavity to about 18
        bars, equally divided among the 1 1/4", 1 3/8" and 1 1/2" widths.
        Smaller up front, larger in the back.
        My bees almost immediately (within a week it seemed) built comb on
        the back 6 bars, starting in the back near the follower board. I
        thought they would start up front near the entrance. Since then they
        have been slowly filling out the comb, and slowly working forward
        toward the entrance. I have now after about 90 days about 8 fully
        drawn bars/comb and maybe three more in the early incomplete stages.
        If I had to start again, I would probably reduced my hive volume to
        the half way mark. Then later as watched them grow, keep moving that
        board back and add more bars. Though honestly, they did not seemed
        fussed with what they got.
        I do have a small landing board in front of my entrance. Through my
        inspections I have not seen evidence of beetles, or skunks for that
        matter. Now I think that board is more for me, those bees don't seem
        to have any trouble finding their way in a hole.
        I did have a trail of ants very soon after the hive started, so
        since then I have put each leg in a pan of motor oil. That has to be
        covered now because many bees have either fallen in or curious to
        know what is that, there are may dead ones in the pans, but no more
        ants!
        As for location, I have mine under a tree, dappled sunlite and
        shade, entrance toward East. Seems to work.
        You would have to be really lucky for a natural swarm to find your
        hive ready to move in. You would all those lemon-grass/propolis
        tricks and pray a lot for them to find it. Seems a little late,
        though. I can give you the name of that guy. He was great.
        Good Luck,
        Ken
      • David
        ... 18 ... they ... stages. ... that ... seem ... be ... Hello Ken, Glad to have finished my TBH, the comb guides I boxed planed thin enough to fit grooves
        Message 3 of 9 , Aug 2, 2008
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          --- In TopHive@yahoogroups.com, "kengilbert12" <kgilbert@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hello David,
          > Congratulations on completing your project.
          > I live in the west side of Los Angeles, and built and started my
          > hive in May. I got a swarm from a bee removal expert in your area
          > for $40.
          > If you like I can give you his contact off-line.
          > I have a follower board inside, reducing the hive cavity to about
          18
          > bars, equally divided among the 1 1/4", 1 3/8" and 1 1/2" widths.
          > Smaller up front, larger in the back.
          > My bees almost immediately (within a week it seemed) built comb on
          > the back 6 bars, starting in the back near the follower board. I
          > thought they would start up front near the entrance. Since then
          they
          > have been slowly filling out the comb, and slowly working forward
          > toward the entrance. I have now after about 90 days about 8 fully
          > drawn bars/comb and maybe three more in the early incomplete
          stages.
          > If I had to start again, I would probably reduced my hive volume to
          > the half way mark. Then later as watched them grow, keep moving
          that
          > board back and add more bars. Though honestly, they did not seemed
          > fussed with what they got.
          > I do have a small landing board in front of my entrance. Through my
          > inspections I have not seen evidence of beetles, or skunks for that
          > matter. Now I think that board is more for me, those bees don't
          seem
          > to have any trouble finding their way in a hole.
          > I did have a trail of ants very soon after the hive started, so
          > since then I have put each leg in a pan of motor oil. That has to
          be
          > covered now because many bees have either fallen in or curious to
          > know what is that, there are may dead ones in the pans, but no more
          > ants!
          > As for location, I have mine under a tree, dappled sunlite and
          > shade, entrance toward East. Seems to work.
          > You would have to be really lucky for a natural swarm to find your
          > hive ready to move in. You would all those lemon-grass/propolis
          > tricks and pray a lot for them to find it. Seems a little late,
          > though. I can give you the name of that guy. He was great.
          > Good Luck,
          > Ken
          >
          Hello Ken,

          Glad to have finished my TBH, the comb guides I boxed planed thin
          enough to fit grooves took the longest as only circular saw. Thanks
          for the positioning info. There is an eastern approach in half sun/
          shade that works. Someone brought that up as well on another board,
          that the landing board isn't found in nature w/ feral hives & seems
          to be more for the keepers need.

          Yes would be interested in the number of the local swarm removal guy.
          Is he in City of Industry? Just email me & I'll check him out w/ my
          friend. How many bees do you get for $40? Did you get a young queen
          or old you think, & does he mention? Sounds like your hive is healthy
          being it has many combs & more developing. I'll keep in mind using
          moveable backing board to reduce space at first when introducing.
          Supposed to be a late summer by many acounts of my gardener friends
          as June gloom came late this July here in southern Calif, but we
          shall see. BTW do you provide your own water nearby or just let em
          forage for their own? Read ya later, gotta checkout the latest on
          Organic Bee group.

          Cheers, David in San Gabriel Valley, southern California
        • azizasaid
          hi there, I ve got an email here from a guy that needs a swarm removed in Woodland Hills, So. Cal. in case anyone s interested. I ve got a cell number for him
          Message 4 of 9 , Aug 3, 2008
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            hi there,
            I've got an email here from a guy that needs a swarm removed in
            Woodland Hills, So. Cal. in case anyone's interested. I've got a cell
            number for him also if you need it.

            best,
            Megan

            From: Andre [mailto:untiedt@...] (untiedt @ gmail . com)
            Sent: Friday, August 01, 2008 9:20 PM
            To: Megan Martin
            Subject: Re: Bee Swarm looking for new home (Woodland Hills)

            Hi Megan,

            When I left home this morning the bees were still there - it would be
            great if some beekeeper would be able to use them.

            Andre
          • David
            ... cell ... be ... Hi Megan, Yes seen this ad in Craigslist.org freebies (no pun intended) http://losangeles.craigslist.org/sfv/zip/777919664.html, but am not
            Message 5 of 9 , Aug 3, 2008
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              --- In TopHive@yahoogroups.com, "azizasaid" <meganm@...> wrote:
              >
              > hi there,
              > I've got an email here from a guy that needs a swarm removed in
              > Woodland Hills, So. Cal. in case anyone's interested. I've got a
              cell
              > number for him also if you need it.
              >
              > best,
              > Megan
              >
              > From: Andre [mailto:untiedt@...] (untiedt @ gmail . com)
              > Sent: Friday, August 01, 2008 9:20 PM
              > To: Megan Martin
              > Subject: Re: Bee Swarm looking for new home (Woodland Hills)
              >
              > Hi Megan,
              >
              > When I left home this morning the bees were still there - it would
              be
              > great if some beekeeper would be able to use them.
              >
              > Andre
              >
              Hi Megan,
              Yes seen this ad in Craigslist.org freebies (no pun intended)
              http://losangeles.craigslist.org/sfv/zip/777919664.html,
              but am not suited yet for the challenge yet,literally. Need week more
              to get friend & myself coverage. Thanks much for the heads up & a
              great week to you & the bees.

              Cheers, David in San Gabriel Valley, southern California
            • OOWONBS@Netscape.net
              ... that the landing board isn t found in nature w/ feral hives & seems to be more for the keepers need. Cheers, David in San Gabriel Valley, southern
              Message 6 of 9 , Aug 5, 2008
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                >Someone brought that up as well on another board,
                that the landing board isn't found in nature w/ feral hives & seems
                to be more for the keepers need.
                Cheers, David in San Gabriel Valley, southern California

                I might argue that there is a landing board in nature.
                But *we* think horizontal, while bees land on a vertical
                surface, often. ;>) Some nice ones are at a 45 degree angle.
                BillSF9c
              • Jennifer Andersen
                True, and natural landing boards tend to be rougher surfaces (tree bark, etc) than we are providing on our hives.  Still, bees seem to do just fine without
                Message 7 of 9 , Aug 5, 2008
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                  True, and natural landing boards tend to be rougher surfaces (tree bark, etc) than we are providing on our hives.  Still, bees seem to do just fine without our artificial horizontal landing surfaces.  I doubt the bees really care which entrance they have, but I like the landing spot as it gives me a place to leave a bottle of water for them in the heat.

                  --- On Tue, 8/5/08, OOWONBS@... <OOWONBS@...> wrote:

                  From: OOWONBS@... <OOWONBS@...>
                  Subject: Re: [TopHive] Re: Positioning of TBH in the Yard & other Considerations
                  To: TopHive@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Tuesday, August 5, 2008, 1:35 AM






                  >Someone brought that up as well on another board,
                  that the landing board isn't found in nature w/ feral hives & seems
                  to be more for the keepers need.
                  Cheers, David in San Gabriel Valley, southern California

                  I might argue that there is a landing board in nature.
                  But *we* think horizontal, while bees land on a vertical
                  surface, often. ;>) Some nice ones are at a 45 degree angle.
                  BillSF9c















                  [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                • David
                  ... Yes, while on day hike last week, in local canyon, personally viewed a wild HB hive at base of burned out (15 years ago) but fully recovered oak. The bees
                  Message 8 of 9 , Aug 17, 2008
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                    --- In TopHive@yahoogroups.com, OOWONBS@... wrote:
                    >
                    > >Someone brought that up as well on another board,
                    > that the landing board isn't found in nature w/ feral hives & seems
                    > to be more for the keepers need.
                    > Cheers, David in San Gabriel Valley, southern California
                    >
                    > I might argue that there is a landing board in nature.
                    > But *we* think horizontal, while bees land on a vertical
                    > surface, often. ;>) Some nice ones are at a 45 degree angle.
                    > BillSF9c
                    >

                    Yes, while on day hike last week, in local canyon, personally viewed
                    a wild HB hive at base of burned out (15 years ago) but fully
                    recovered oak. The bees were landing on the vertical side of east
                    facing opening. They were going after wild flat topped Calif.
                    buckwheat, & flowering Coastal sagebrush (Artemisia californica)
                    amongst other numerous wild & suburban flowers not far away. Can't
                    capture as in wildlife preserve & as spotted deer nearby in
                    afternoon, must be careful of deer ticks,
                    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tick . Hopefully figure out how to
                    upload 60sec video to share wild hive online shortly.


                    Cheers, David in San Gabriel Valley, southern California
                  • David
                    ... bark, etc) than we are providing on our hives.  Still, bees seem to do just fine without our artificial horizontal landing surfaces.  I doubt the bees
                    Message 9 of 9 , Aug 17, 2008
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                      --- In TopHive@yahoogroups.com, Jennifer Andersen
                      <cattledogdreams@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > True, and natural landing boards tend to be rougher surfaces (tree
                      bark, etc) than we are providing on our hives.  Still, bees seem to
                      do just fine without our artificial horizontal landing surfaces.  I
                      doubt the bees really care which entrance they have, but I like the
                      landing spot as it gives me a place to leave a bottle of water for
                      them in the heat.
                      >
                      >

                      Hello,
                      Yes tree bark was the preferred landing pad for aforementioned wild
                      hive. Most of the hive entries were avoiding the oak leaf carpeted
                      horizontal base, but the opening was larger than typical man made
                      hives, & many were just zooming to the comb.

                      Do you use straight tap cold/ hot water or also additives? Hear small
                      amount of vinegar is supposed to be beneficial?

                      Cheers, David in San Gabriel Valley, southern Calif.
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