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bee space

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  • elizacampbell1960
    Hello, I am new to the group and have done lots of reading but am left with a couple of basic questions I need answered quickly. I am expecting 3 pkgs. next
    Message 1 of 14 , Jun 1, 2008
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      Hello, I am new to the group and have done lots of reading but am left
      with a couple of basic questions I need answered quickly. I am
      expecting 3 pkgs. next week and I am putting the final touches on my
      HTBhives.

      Do you need bee space above the top bars, under the lid?
      If so how much do you recommend? I am getting Buckfast bees.

      Do any of you, in really cold areas (I am in southern Ontario Canada)
      leave room under the lid for insulation of any sort or do you add
      insulation or wrapping on the outside to winterize them?

      I am thinking of putting 3 one inch round holes on the side but at one
      end, near the bottom.
      Is this a good idea? Do the bees have any problem cleaning out their
      hive or should the holes be really low, really close to the bottom?
      Will this be enough ventilation in the winter? The bottom of the hive
      is screened but will be covered when it gets colder.

      Thank you very much for your input in advance.
      eliza
    • Michael Vanecek
      TBH hives don t need bee-space above the top-bars - the top-bars completely enclose the cavity so a bee-space would be useless anyway. I live in Texas so I
      Message 2 of 14 , Jun 1, 2008
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        TBH hives don't need "bee-space" above the top-bars - the top-bars
        completely enclose the cavity so a bee-space would be useless anyway.

        I live in Texas so I can't help with hive insulation issues.

        Bees can clean out the hive just fine with top-entrance, mid-entrance or
        bottom entrance. I prefer a top-entrance myself on one of the short
        ends. I also don't use a landing board - there's been documentation that
        hive beetles use the landing board to help land since they're fairly
        clumsy fliers. Bees don't need it, so why have it? Some people even use
        one of the top-bars on the end to create an entrance. That's a top-bar
        top entrance. Bees can carry debris up out the entrance as easily as
        thru the bottom entrance. Plus, with a bottom entrance, you face the
        problem with dead bees clogging up the entrance in winter, and for me
        down South, with a dropped honey comb blocking the entrance with honey
        and debris, increasing the temperature even further and resulting in a
        catastrophic hive loss.

        I prefer an entrance on the small end rather than in the middle of the
        long end. Why split up the honey section with a central brood section? I
        believe that with the brood section at one end, it's way less intrusive
        to be able to rob the honey from the other end with far less intrusion.

        Be well,
        Mike

        --
        Zone 8, Texas
        http://www.taroandti.com/ Exotic Plants and More...
        http://www.mjv.com/ Home...



        elizacampbell1960 wrote:
        > Hello, I am new to the group and have done lots of reading but am left
        > with a couple of basic questions I need answered quickly. I am
        > expecting 3 pkgs. next week and I am putting the final touches on my
        > HTBhives.
        >
        > Do you need bee space above the top bars, under the lid?
        > If so how much do you recommend? I am getting Buckfast bees.
        >
        > Do any of you, in really cold areas (I am in southern Ontario Canada)
        > leave room under the lid for insulation of any sort or do you add
        > insulation or wrapping on the outside to winterize them?
        >
        > I am thinking of putting 3 one inch round holes on the side but at one
        > end, near the bottom.
        > Is this a good idea? Do the bees have any problem cleaning out their
        > hive or should the holes be really low, really close to the bottom?
        > Will this be enough ventilation in the winter? The bottom of the hive
        > is screened but will be covered when it gets colder.
        >
        > Thank you very much for your input in advance.
        > eliza
        >
        >
        >
      • Jennifer Andersen
        With regard to entrances, I recently changed my entrance to the middle so that the brood chamber would be able to expand in two directions. This is the first
        Message 3 of 14 , Jun 2, 2008
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          With regard to entrances, I recently changed my entrance to the middle so that the brood chamber would be able to expand in two directions. This is the first year I have tried this.

          Both my hives swarmend this year even though there was plenty of room in the hive. It appeared this occured because the bees had finished a comb of honey that constricted the brood chamber (in both hives) and I did not notice it in time. With the brood chamber having two directions to expand, I am hoping the queen will not be so easily confined by her workers and I will have a better chance of catching the problem and moving the comb before a swarm.

          However, my managment style is "less is best". That is, I only open up the hive about three or four times a year if there aren't any obvious problems that I can see from the outside. I do not have a traditional top-bar hive for this reason (Top Bars require more maintenance to keep the comb from getting stuck to the sides of the hive). Mine is a 4 foot long hybrid hive I call a "Lateral Lang" (uses all the same equipment as a Langstoth hive, but all on one level). So, for those of you with traditional top bars, I imagine you keep on top of the brood chamber better than I do, so the other considerations that MIke pointed out might be more important.

          Jennifer

          Michael Vanecek <mike@...> wrote:
          TBH hives don't need "bee-space" above the top-bars - the top-bars
          completely enclose the cavity so a bee-space would be useless anyway.

          I live in Texas so I can't help with hive insulation issues.

          Bees can clean out the hive just fine with top-entrance, mid-entrance or
          bottom entrance. I prefer a top-entrance myself on one of the short
          ends. I also don't use a landing board - there's been documentation that
          hive beetles use the landing board to help land since they're fairly
          clumsy fliers. Bees don't need it, so why have it? Some people even use
          one of the top-bars on the end to create an entrance. That's a top-bar
          top entrance. Bees can carry debris up out the entrance as easily as
          thru the bottom entrance. Plus, with a bottom entrance, you face the
          problem with dead bees clogging up the entrance in winter, and for me
          down South, with a dropped honey comb blocking the entrance with honey
          and debris, increasing the temperature even further and resulting in a
          catastrophic hive loss.

          I prefer an entrance on the small end rather than in the middle of the
          long end. Why split up the honey section with a central brood section? I
          believe that with the brood section at one end, it's way less intrusive
          to be able to rob the honey from the other end with far less intrusion.

          Be well,
          Mike

          --
          Zone 8, Texas
          http://www.taroandti.com/ Exotic Plants and More...
          http://www.mjv.com/ Home...

          elizacampbell1960 wrote:
          > Hello, I am new to the group and have done lots of reading but am left
          > with a couple of basic questions I need answered quickly. I am
          > expecting 3 pkgs. next week and I am putting the final touches on my
          > HTBhives.
          >
          > Do you need bee space above the top bars, under the lid?
          > If so how much do you recommend? I am getting Buckfast bees.
          >
          > Do any of you, in really cold areas (I am in southern Ontario Canada)
          > leave room under the lid for insulation of any sort or do you add
          > insulation or wrapping on the outside to winterize them?
          >
          > I am thinking of putting 3 one inch round holes on the side but at one
          > end, near the bottom.
          > Is this a good idea? Do the bees have any problem cleaning out their
          > hive or should the holes be really low, really close to the bottom?
          > Will this be enough ventilation in the winter? The bottom of the hive
          > is screened but will be covered when it gets colder.
          >
          > Thank you very much for your input in advance.
          > eliza
          >
          >
          >





          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Michael Vanecek
          Hives naturally swarm. Less is best management will result in swarming regardless of the entrance position because that s how hives naturally propagate.
          Message 4 of 14 , Jun 2, 2008
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            Hives naturally swarm. Less is best management will result in swarming
            regardless of the entrance position because that's how hives naturally
            propagate. Managing just a little more will help allay that issue - you
            don't have to go into the brood section, just go up to it periodically
            and add a few bars between it and the honey to give the hive a little
            more breathing room. Then when you have an over-abundance of
            brood-combs, do a split - basically, swarm under your conditions rather
            than theirs. That way you don't lose half of your hive or more (there
            can be multiple swarms in a year) and production isn't adversely affected.

            My next hive will be a long Lang style. It'll have home-made frames so
            that they will have top-bar style tops rather than the bee-space
            top-bars you see in regular Lang frames - so from outside it'll look
            like a Tanzanian top-bar hive. I figure about 48" should be long enough.
            The entrance will be on one end and I may put a smoker-hole (with a flap
            to close it) on the other end. This is popular in Africa for both
            European and African bees. African bees are extremely swarm-prone and
            these hives allow them to be managed so they don't swarm so much. You
            puff a little smoke into the smoker hole and that makes the bees go
            forward into the brood section so you don't have as many bees on the
            honey section to deal with. Then you harvest your honey and make sure
            there's enough room for the brood then close it up again. I see that as
            a marriage of top-bar and Langstroth - the best of both worlds. No
            supers to deal with either. And you have your choice of foundationless
            frames - basically top-bar frames - or frames with foundations. I'll try
            both and see how it works.

            Be well,
            Mike

            --
            Zone 8, Texas
            http://www.taroandti.com/ Exotic Plants and More...
            http://www.mjv.com/ Home...



            Jennifer Andersen wrote:
            > With regard to entrances, I recently changed my entrance to the middle so that the brood chamber would be able to expand in two directions. This is the first year I have tried this.
            >
            > Both my hives swarmend this year even though there was plenty of room in the hive. It appeared this occured because the bees had finished a comb of honey that constricted the brood chamber (in both hives) and I did not notice it in time. With the brood chamber having two directions to expand, I am hoping the queen will not be so easily confined by her workers and I will have a better chance of catching the problem and moving the comb before a swarm.
            >
            > However, my managment style is "less is best". That is, I only open up the hive about three or four times a year if there aren't any obvious problems that I can see from the outside. I do not have a traditional top-bar hive for this reason (Top Bars require more maintenance to keep the comb from getting stuck to the sides of the hive). Mine is a 4 foot long hybrid hive I call a "Lateral Lang" (uses all the same equipment as a Langstoth hive, but all on one level). So, for those of you with traditional top bars, I imagine you keep on top of the brood chamber better than I do, so the other considerations that MIke pointed out might be more important.
            >
            > Jennifer
            >
            >
          • Ben Foldes
            For the less is more approach, you might want to look into a Warre-style hive. It s a vertically-oriented TBH, designed to be opened twice a year (barring you
            Message 5 of 14 , Jun 2, 2008
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              For the less is more approach, you might want to look into a
              Warre-style hive. It's a vertically-oriented TBH, designed to be
              opened twice a year (barring you noticing something being wrong from
              entrance activity). There's a Warre beekeeping group, with Abbe
              Warre's book outlining the hive and his reasons for it in the files
              section.
              Ben


              --- In TopHive@yahoogroups.com, Michael Vanecek <mike@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hives naturally swarm. Less is best management will result in swarming
              > regardless of the entrance position because that's how hives naturally
              > propagate. Managing just a little more will help allay that issue - you
              > don't have to go into the brood section, just go up to it periodically
              > and add a few bars between it and the honey to give the hive a little
              > more breathing room. Then when you have an over-abundance of
              > brood-combs, do a split - basically, swarm under your conditions rather
              > than theirs. That way you don't lose half of your hive or more (there
              > can be multiple swarms in a year) and production isn't adversely
              affected.
              >
              > My next hive will be a long Lang style. It'll have home-made frames so
              > that they will have top-bar style tops rather than the bee-space
              > top-bars you see in regular Lang frames - so from outside it'll look
              > like a Tanzanian top-bar hive. I figure about 48" should be long
              enough.
              > The entrance will be on one end and I may put a smoker-hole (with a
              flap
              > to close it) on the other end. This is popular in Africa for both
              > European and African bees. African bees are extremely swarm-prone and
              > these hives allow them to be managed so they don't swarm so much. You
              > puff a little smoke into the smoker hole and that makes the bees go
              > forward into the brood section so you don't have as many bees on the
              > honey section to deal with. Then you harvest your honey and make sure
              > there's enough room for the brood then close it up again. I see that as
              > a marriage of top-bar and Langstroth - the best of both worlds. No
              > supers to deal with either. And you have your choice of foundationless
              > frames - basically top-bar frames - or frames with foundations. I'll
              try
              > both and see how it works.
              >
              > Be well,
              > Mike
              >
              > --
              > Zone 8, Texas
              > http://www.taroandti.com/ Exotic Plants and More...
              > http://www.mjv.com/ Home...
              >
              >
              >
              > Jennifer Andersen wrote:
              > > With regard to entrances, I recently changed my entrance to the
              middle so that the brood chamber would be able to expand in two
              directions. This is the first year I have tried this.
              > >
              > > Both my hives swarmend this year even though there was plenty of
              room in the hive. It appeared this occured because the bees had
              finished a comb of honey that constricted the brood chamber (in both
              hives) and I did not notice it in time. With the brood chamber having
              two directions to expand, I am hoping the queen will not be so easily
              confined by her workers and I will have a better chance of catching
              the problem and moving the comb before a swarm.
              > >
              > > However, my managment style is "less is best". That is, I only
              open up the hive about three or four times a year if there aren't any
              obvious problems that I can see from the outside. I do not have a
              traditional top-bar hive for this reason (Top Bars require more
              maintenance to keep the comb from getting stuck to the sides of the
              hive). Mine is a 4 foot long hybrid hive I call a "Lateral Lang"
              (uses all the same equipment as a Langstoth hive, but all on one
              level). So, for those of you with traditional top bars, I imagine you
              keep on top of the brood chamber better than I do, so the other
              considerations that MIke pointed out might be more important.
              > >
              > > Jennifer
              > >
              > >
              >
            • Michael Vanecek
              The only problem I have with the Warre hive is that to add more supers, you add them to the bottom, meaning you have to lift the whole hive. Of course, I m
              Message 6 of 14 , Jun 2, 2008
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                The only problem I have with the Warre hive is that to add more supers,
                you add them to the bottom, meaning you have to lift the whole hive. Of
                course, I'm sure there are creative solutions. They're beautiful hives!
                Basically a stacked top-bar where the bees work from the top down, as in
                nature.

                Be well,
                Mike

                --
                Zone 8, Texas
                http://www.taroandti.com/ Exotic Plants and More...
                http://www.mjv.com/ Home...



                Ben Foldes wrote:
                > For the less is more approach, you might want to look into a
                > Warre-style hive. It's a vertically-oriented TBH, designed to be
                > opened twice a year (barring you noticing something being wrong from
                > entrance activity). There's a Warre beekeeping group, with Abbe
                > Warre's book outlining the hive and his reasons for it in the files
                > section.
                > Ben
                >
                >
              • Michael Vanecek
                Let me amend that - my Long Lang may very well have altered Dadant frames. I work at a hardware store so I have the luxury to browse thru our wood and I found
                Message 7 of 14 , Jun 2, 2008
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                  Let me amend that - my Long Lang may very well have altered Dadant
                  frames. I work at a hardware store so I have the luxury to browse thru
                  our wood and I found a 1/8" x 1 3/8" piece of molding that we sell that
                  would be absolutely perfect if glued and stapled to the top of a Dadant
                  frame to kill the bee-space and make it a top-bar style frame. That
                  would be actually cheaper than trying to build the frames from scratch,
                  methinks. Now, to explore foundationless techniques. I'm hoping if the
                  bees will make comb over tightly strung wire that the resulting comb
                  would be able to be extracted and re-used. Anyone have any experience
                  with this?

                  Be well,
                  Mike

                  --
                  Zone 8, Texas
                  http://www.taroandti.com/ Exotic Plants and More...
                  http://www.mjv.com/ Home...



                  Michael Vanecek wrote:
                  > My next hive will be a long Lang style. It'll have home-made frames so
                  > that they will have top-bar style tops rather than the bee-space
                  > top-bars you see in regular Lang frames - so from outside it'll look
                  > like a Tanzanian top-bar hive.
                • OOWONBS@Netscape.net
                  ... with a couple of basic questions I need answered quickly. I am expecting 3 pkgs. next week and I am putting the final touches on my HTBhives. Do you need
                  Message 8 of 14 , Jun 3, 2008
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                    > I am new to the group and have done lots of reading but am left
                    with a couple of basic questions I need answered quickly. I am
                    expecting 3 pkgs. next week and I am putting the final touches on my
                    HTBhives.

                    Do you need bee space above the top bars, under the lid?
                    If so how much do you recommend? I am getting Buckfast bees.

                    I can't remem all the bee types, at present.
                    1) no. 2) It is sometimes, used.

                    >Do any of you, in really cold areas (I am in southern Ontario Canada)
                    leave room under the lid for insulation of any sort or do you add
                    insulation or wrapping on the outside to winterize them?

                    You might use a telescoping lig, & add merely 1/4", 1/2" or a layer
                    of bubblewrap or two. 2 layers of 1/4' beats 1 layer of 1/2" in
                    bubblewrap's case.

                    >I am thinking of putting 3 one inch round holes on the side but at one
                    end, near the bottom. Is this a good idea? Do the bees have any problem
                    cleaning out their hive or should the holes be really low, really close
                    to
                    the bottom?

                    Dunno. Why not, 1 high, (summer cooling, ! low, winter heat-saving,]
                    1, uh, somewhere else.

                    >Will this be enough ventilation in the winter? The bottom of the hive
                    is screened but will be covered when it gets colder.

                    Sounds like enuf. Or more than, in the winter. Put me in a sleeping bag
                    in the winter, and I am nowhere near the head opening, on an open
                    tent...

                    >Thank you very much for your input in advance.
                    eliza

                    >TBH hives don't need "bee-space" above the top-bars - the top-bars
                    completely enclose the cavity so a bee-space would be useless anyway.
                    I live in Texas so I can't help with hive insulation issues.
                    Mike, Texas

                    I'll look for an ALASKAN bee list I an in.
                    And Mike, you have heat issues. Insulate, some.
                    Yes, a lil dif, sure.

                    BillSF9c
                  • Michael Vanecek
                    My top-bar has a pair of 3x4 square wood bars going the length of the hive on top of the hive and on top of that I have a sheet of solarboard plywood. Very
                    Message 9 of 14 , Jun 3, 2008
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                      My top-bar has a pair of 3x4" square wood bars going the length of the
                      hive on top of the hive and on top of that I have a sheet of solarboard
                      plywood. Very good at taking the heat down a few degrees, plus the
                      air-space let's more air thru the little spaces between the top-bars,
                      especially when there's a breeze. So far, so good. In the winter,
                      they'll just propolize those little spaces so I'm good either way.

                      Be well,
                      Mike

                      --
                      Zone 8, Texas
                      http://www.taroandti.com/ Exotic Plants and More...
                      http://www.mjv.com/ Home...



                      OOWONBS@... wrote:
                      > And Mike, you have heat issues. Insulate, some.
                      > Yes, a lil dif, sure.
                      >
                      > BillSF9c
                      >
                      >
                    • Gold Star Honeybees
                      Hi, all - I d like to hear a sound-off from people who have got observation windows in the sides of their top-bar hives. 1) What are the windows made of?
                      Message 10 of 14 , Jun 3, 2008
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                        Hi, all -



                        I'd like to hear a sound-off from people who have got observation windows in
                        the sides of their top-bar hives.



                        1) What are the windows made of? Glass? Plexiglas? Something else I
                        haven't heard of?

                        2) How big are they? And --

                        3) How are they covered?



                        -- Christy Hemenway

                        GOLD STAR HONEYBEES

                        "It's not about the honey, Honey - it's about the Bees!"

                        207-449-1121

                        www.goldstarhoneybees.com <http://www.goldstarhoneybees.com/>

                        Some great bee sites: www.biobees.com <http://www.biobees.com/> , and
                        www.bushfarms.com/bees.htm, and www.beeguardian.org
                        <http://www.beeguardian.org/>



                        "'Tis with our judgments as our watches, none go just alike, yet each
                        believes his own." --Alexander Pope

                        _____



                        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                      • Ken Gilbert
                        I have two TBH, both with windows, and it works great! You can see a photo on this blog of which I am a guest:
                        Message 11 of 14 , Jun 3, 2008
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                          I have two TBH, both with windows, and it works great!
                          You can see a photo on this blog of which I am a guest:
                          http://topbarbees.wordpress.com/2008/05/23/kens-hives-and-new-bees/
                          As you can see, it takes up about 70% the length and 50% the height of
                          the side of the hive. My hive is only about 36 inches long, so that is a
                          window of about 24" x 5".
                          The window is glass, and it is set flush to the inside of the hive wall,
                          so the inside is one smooth continuous surface, there is no step up or
                          down or frame where the glass is set inside. I routed out the depth of
                          the glass and epoxied it in place.
                          On the outside, I have a door, very much like your kitchen or bathroom
                          cabinet door, with spring closing hinges and a knob. With the door
                          closed it is completely dark inside, no light leaking in.
                          I love it. I am a first time bee keeper, and it has satisfied my
                          curiosity immensely without disturbing the bees too much.
                          I can open the door, look in the window, and have a good view of the
                          mystery that is happening in there.
                          Do they sense when the window is open? Sure, one or two come to the
                          glass like a curious fly, but they are so busy in there who cares. I
                          never have it open for more than a minute, and I only check every few
                          days or a week might pass.
                          If you are really curious I can get you more details and photos. One
                          hive is empty and I could take all kinds of photos.
                          Ken



                          ________________________________

                          From: TopHive@yahoogroups.com [mailto:TopHive@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
                          Of Gold Star Honeybees
                          Sent: Tuesday, June 03, 2008 3:06 PM
                          To: TopHive@yahoogroups.com
                          Subject: [TopHive] Observation windows



                          Hi, all -

                          I'd like to hear a sound-off from people who have got observation
                          windows in
                          the sides of their top-bar hives.

                          1) What are the windows made of? Glass? Plexiglas? Something else I
                          haven't heard of?

                          2) How big are they? And --

                          3) How are they covered?

                          -- Christy Hemenway

                          GOLD STAR HONEYBEES

                          "It's not about the honey, Honey - it's about the Bees!"

                          207-449-1121

                          www.goldstarhoneybees.com <http://www.goldstarhoneybees.com/
                          <http://www.goldstarhoneybees.com/> >

                          Some great bee sites: www.biobees.com <http://www.biobees.com/
                          <http://www.biobees.com/> > , and
                          www.bushfarms.com/bees.htm, and www.beeguardian.org
                          <http://www.beeguardian.org/ <http://www.beeguardian.org/> >

                          "'Tis with our judgments as our watches, none go just alike, yet each
                          believes his own." --Alexander Pope

                          _____

                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]






                          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                        • mike hoffman
                          Hi Christy, I have an observation window, 4 by 24 from recycled glass. I made a wood cover held in place by toggles. It sure is fun to watch them in there, I
                          Message 12 of 14 , Jun 4, 2008
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                            Hi Christy,
                            I have an observation window, 4" by 24" from recycled glass. I made a
                            wood cover held in place by toggles.
                            It sure is fun to watch them in there, I have the hive situated so that
                            you can sit and watch from in the house.
                            Kids really like it.
                            Thanks,
                            mike h



                            On Tue, 3 Jun 2008 18:05:36 -0400, "Gold Star Honeybees"
                            <christy@...> said:
                            > Hi, all -
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > I'd like to hear a sound-off from people who have got observation windows
                            > in
                            > the sides of their top-bar hives.
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > 1) What are the windows made of? Glass? Plexiglas? Something else I
                            > haven't heard of?
                            >
                            > 2) How big are they? And --
                            >
                            > 3) How are they covered?
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > -- Christy Hemenway
                            >
                            > GOLD STAR HONEYBEES
                            >
                            > "It's not about the honey, Honey - it's about the Bees!"
                            >
                            > 207-449-1121
                            >
                            > www.goldstarhoneybees.com <http://www.goldstarhoneybees.com/>
                            >
                            > Some great bee sites: www.biobees.com <http://www.biobees.com/> , and
                            > www.bushfarms.com/bees.htm, and www.beeguardian.org
                            > <http://www.beeguardian.org/>
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > "'Tis with our judgments as our watches, none go just alike, yet each
                            > believes his own." --Alexander Pope
                            >
                            > _____
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                            >
                            --
                            mike hoffman
                            m_hoffman@...
                          • OOWONBS@Netscape.net
                            ... windows in the sides of their top-bar hives. Let me poke a little fun here, and claim prejudice... (I ve spoken w Cristy and she s nice, so remember this
                            Message 13 of 14 , Jun 5, 2008
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                              >I'd like to hear a sound-off from people who have got observation
                              windows in the sides of their top-bar hives.

                              Let me poke a little fun here, and claim prejudice...
                              (I've spoken w Cristy and she's nice, so remember this is jocularity.
                              Well. mostly... ;>)

                              WhY... are you only interested in TB observation windows that
                              are on the sides of the hives?!? ThiMk about that. Seriously...

                              >1) What are the windows made of? Glass? Plexiglas?
                              Something else I
                              haven't heard of?

                              First, I haven't concluded my design yet, and who
                              knows when I will... some setbacks with my partner.
                              My life... his life... Life, ya know?

                              But lexan is a high temp plexi... and pretty scratch resistant.
                              Glass can be scraped clean with low scratch risk. A razor
                              blade seems the obvious tool.

                              I might ask, how often it seems required to delete propylis,
                              and what % of "glass' is occluded, initially, or by smeraring
                              when you clean it.

                              I'll assume, this is annual? Or not...

                              So, do you make haste or swap bars into a spare hive?

                              >2) How big are they? And --

                              Most seem to cover front to rear and all but 2 or 4 frames,
                              er, bar-lengths... And most seem to be about 4" tall.
                              And most are flush with the inside. With most designs, this
                              means no easy removal to clean a window.

                              >3) How are they covered?

                              Wood predominates. I'll guess that 25% are hinged. The same,
                              slide. Most have a wooden or metal clip on the lower and a
                              clip on the upper near ea end. Sometimes a 3rd for long ones.

                              In any event, comb blocks a lot of the view. I wonder about a
                              window on each side, one mainly for light passage, although
                              it may as well be similar.

                              BillSF9c
                            • Michael Vanecek
                              I cut out my second colony of honeybees this past weekend. It was from a framed well-cover and a hive that had been there for 5 years. The owner had ordered an
                              Message 14 of 14 , Jun 9, 2008
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                                I cut out my second colony of honeybees this past weekend. It was from a
                                framed well-cover and a hive that had been there for 5 years. The owner
                                had ordered an extermination and the guy drilled two holes into the top
                                and sprayed, but while that killed thousands of bees, it didn't destroy
                                the hive. Now, two months after the spraying, I come and remove a pretty
                                healthy and very docile hive. I also test an alternative technique to
                                tying up comb to top-bars too - and it worked marvelously - far better
                                than just tying up with string. Here's my article about it:

                                http://bees.taroandti.com/2008/06/09/second-cutout/

                                Be well,
                                Mike

                                --
                                Zone 8, Texas
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