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Re: [TolkienDiscussions] Re: The Hobbit - Chapter Nineteen Summary

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  • -
    ... journeys of Frodo and his friends. Karen W. Fonstad, author of the Atlas of Middle-Earth, has provided detailed walking mileage charts for those who want
    Message 1 of 13 , Mar 31, 2008
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      On Mon, Mar 31, 2008 at 10:52 AM, <whiteladyofrohan@...> wrote:
      Ye, wanderlust.  Probably what drew me to the Hobbit to begin with.
       
      In a message dated 3/31/2008 12:23:15 P.M. Eastern Daylight Time, tea_party@... writes:
      Makes you wonder what it would be like to set out on foot and walk
      halfway across a continent.
      Tolkien has provided so much detail in LOTR that you can actually walk the journeys of Frodo and his friends. Karen W. Fonstad, author of the Atlas of Middle-Earth, has provided detailed walking mileage charts for those who want to do their own walking exercise and travel along with them. <http://home.insightbb.com/~eowynchallenge/Walk/walk.html>

      The maps from The Journeys of Frodo are more detailed for walkers. Here is one for the first hours or so of Frodo's journey from Bag End to Riverdell: <http://www.fortunecity.co.uk/library/fantasy/11/hobbiton_to_bywater.htm>

      Here is what it says in LOTR about this leg of the journey:

      'Well, now we're off at last!' said Frodo. They shouldered their packs and took up their sticks, and walked round the corner to the west side of Bag End. 'Good-bye!' said Frodo, looking at the dark blank windows, He waved his hand, and then turned and (following Bilbo, if he had know it) hurried after Peregrin down the garden-path. They jumped over the low place in the hedge at the bottom and took to the fields, passing into the darkness like a rustle in the grasses.

      At the bottom of the Hill on its western side they came to the gate opening on to a narrow lane. There they halted and adjusted the straps of their packs....

      For a short way they followed the lane westwards. Then leaving it they turned left and took quietly to the fields again. They went in single file along hedgerows and the borders of coppices, and night fell dark about them....

      After some time they crossed The Water, west of Hobbiton, by a narrow plank-bridge. The stream was there no more than a winding black ribbon bordered with leaning alder-trees. A mile or two further south they hastily crossed the great road from the Brandywine Bridge; they were now in Tookland and bending south-eastwards they made for the Green Hill Country. As they began to climb its first slopes they looked back and saw the lamps in Hobbiton far off twinkling in the gentle valley of the Water. Soon it disappeared in the folds of the darkened land, and was followed by Bywater beside its grey pool. When the light of the last farm was far behind peeping among the trees, Frodo turned and waved a hand in farewell.

      'I wonder if I shall ever look down into that valley again,' he said quietly....
      ------------------------------

      From the map, you can see the Green Dragon and Farmer Cotton's place to the east in Bywater. I do recommend getting the book Journeys of Frodo if you can otherwise here is the full index: <http://www.fortunecity.co.uk/library/fantasy/11/maps.htm>. 




      Create a Home Theater Like the Pros. Watch the video on AOL Home.

    • John Davis
      Hi, I wonder if, like meditation, walking long distances like that can be a way of emptying the mind, of returning to a more animal-like state of awareness.
      Message 2 of 13 , Apr 1, 2008
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        Hi,

        I wonder if, like meditation, walking long distances like that can be a way
        of emptying the mind, of returning to a more animal-like state of awareness.

        Which might sound like new-age waffle, but walking every day certainly helps
        clear my thoughts, and I can only imagine that walking all day every day
        would do this but to a far greater degree.

        I suppose, also, that given both of their long lifespans, and the slower
        pace of life in Middle-earth, a few month's walk would be less staggeringly
        different to their usual existence than it is for us.

        John
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: <steveseg@...>
        To: <TolkienDiscussions@yahoogroups.com>
        Sent: Monday, March 31, 2008 5:47 PM
        Subject: Re: [TolkienDiscussions] Re: The Hobbit - Chapter Nineteen Summary


        > Matt wondered:
        >
        > When a journey takes so many months, one wonders what two companions
        > would talk about for so long. Do they fall into long periods of quiet,
        > or did Gandalf regale Bilbo with the history of Ea?
        >
        >
        > Steve responds: The possability of such a conversation staggers the mind.
        > Mine at least.
        >
        > Steve S.
        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: Matt <tea_party@...>
        > To: TolkienDiscussions@yahoogroups.com
        > Sent: Mon, 31 Mar 2008 12:22 pm
        > Subject: [TolkienDiscussions] Re: The Hobbit - Chapter Nineteen Summary
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > It is interesting that Bilbo has such a whimsical title for his
        > memoirs, while Frodo gives his a much more pragmatic one.
        >
        > One wonders what inspired Tolkien to give Bilbo such horrendously
        > awful relatives. Perhaps his own in-laws?? Bilbo's relatives always
        > make me feel uneasy.
        >
        > When a journey takes so many months, one wonders what two companions
        > would talk about for so long. Do they fall into long periods of quiet,
        > or did Gandalf regale Bilbo with the history of Ea?
        >
        > Very few people undertake journeys of this distance on foot anymore.
        > Certainly not for a purpose. Most commonly it is done for recreation.
        > Makes you wonder what it would be like to set out on foot and walk
        > halfway across a continent.
        >
        > Matt West
        >
        > --- In TolkienDiscussions@yahoogroups.com, steveseg@... wrote:
        >>
        >> "The Last Stage" is appropriately enough the nineteenth and last
        > chapter of "The Hobbit."?
        >>
        >> Bilbo and Gandalf had just crossed the Misty Mountains and were
        > making their way to Rivendell, which they reach on May 1st. It is
        > evening as they enter the Last (or First) Homely House and the elves
        > greet the pair in song, as is their way. This particular song
        > celebrates the death of Smaug and the cleansing of nearby lands.
        >>
        >> The hobbit and wizard are then met by a party of elves and taken to
        > the house of Elrond where the pair regaled the household with the
        > details of their adventures since leaving Rivendell on their way to
        > Erebor.
        >>
        >> During the recital, Bilbo learned that Gandalf had been attending a
        > council of white wizards (were there any declared black wizards?),
        > which then drove the Necromancer from Dol Goldur in the south of
        > Mirkwood. Perhaps Sauron was thought of as a Black Wizard though he
        > was actually so much more. Possibly a couple of the Ring Wraiths were
        > once wizards or sorcerers and still practiced their arts. As to the
        > Blue Wizards, they might have turned to the shadow out in the lands to
        > the east of Rhun...
        >>
        >> Bilbo falls asleep soon after the talk of dragons and wizards is
        > ended and awakes in a bed during the night with elves paying him
        > homage in song. The hobbit banters with the elves outside his window
        > before returning to sleep. Within a week Bilbo and Gandalf take leave
        > of Elrond and Rivendell, and begin the last stage of their journey to
        > the Shire. A strong rain accompanies them as Gandalf states "There is
        > a long road yet" and Bilbo responds "But it is the last road."
        >>
        >> Soon the Wild is left behind and Bilbo recalls many of the places
        > along the road where he, Gandalf and the dwarves had journeyed on
        > their way east. This includes the gold hoard of Tom, Bert and bill,
        > the man-eating trolls. Wizard and hobbit split the treasure between them.
        >>
        >> As the month of June advanced, so too did the odd pair and finally
        > the Shire is entered and soon thereafter, the Hill in Hobbiton. Bilbo
        > is prompted to poetry at the sight, commenting on how the "roads go
        > ever ever on," hinting at the horrors of the world and the warmth of
        > home, in a cyclical journey.
        >>
        >> The door to Bilbo's home is reached, ending the cycle in its'
        > entirety. To his shock, he finds Bag End overrun with locals removing
        > the contents of his home which they purchased at auction. It takes
        > years for Bilbo to finally resolve the legalities of the situation,
        > with the Sackville-Bagginses proving to be the worst culprits involved.
        >>
        >> Aside from losing some spoons, the hobbit had also lost his
        > respectable reputation, except for a few of the wilder Tooks, from
        > that side. Bilbo is not concerned with the loss of either the spoons
        > or reputation. Well, the spoons might have rankled him a bit more than
        > he led on...
        >>
        >> Bilbo's sword and mail were put on display, at Bag End and a museum,
        > respectively, though surely he retrieved the latter at some point. He
        > took to writing more poetry and visiting elves, though they were
        > probably in transit to Lune, preparatory to leaving Middle-Earth.
        >>
        >> The hobbit even took to writing his memoirs, "There and Back
        > Again,?a Hobbit's Holiday." In fact, some years after his adventures
        > in the Wild, while writing these memoirs, Gandalf shows up with Balin
        > and the trio waste no time in catching up on events during and since
        > their time together. Bard had rebuilt Dale and Lake-town still
        > prospered as well, though the old Master had come to a bad end. The
        > dwarves, men and elves of the region surrounding the Lonely Mountain
        > were mutually allied and this becomes significant during the War of
        > the Ring.
        >>
        >> The chapter and book end with Gandalf saying "You are a very fine
        > person, Mr. Baggins, and I am very fond of you, but you are only quite
        > a little fellow in a wide world after all!" The hobbit laughingly
        > responds "Thank goodness" as he hands the wizard a tobacco-jar.
        >>
        >> Steve S.
        >>
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • Matt
        Exactly! I was left pondering that idea for quite a while. No one spends that kind of time with another person anymore. How much time do you actually spend
        Message 3 of 13 , Apr 1, 2008
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          Exactly! I was left pondering that idea for quite a while. No one
          spends that kind of time with another person anymore. How much time do
          you actually spend talking to your friends? your spouse? your
          children? Not much compared to the kind of time these guys had as they
          walked from Erebor to The Shire.

          I have found in my life that I built the strongest bonds with the
          people that I have hiked with. I'm not talking about a stroll in the
          woods, but real arduous hiking and sleeping out under the stars. For
          example, I spent 4 separate 3 week trips hiking valleys and climbing
          cliffs for my Geology degree. Usually those excursions were with only
          one or two others. You really bond with someone whom you faced danger
          with or with whom you accomplished a great journey.

          For this reason, I hope that I can take my daughter on an arduous hike
          someday before she is too old to want to spend that kind of time with
          her old man. I just have to wait until she is old enough and strong
          enough to do it. I know a couple of father/daughter teams that have
          done extensive hiking, such as on the Appalachian Trail, and have
          built life long bonds that they could not have achieved in the day to
          day life of city living.

          Matt West


          --- In TolkienDiscussions@yahoogroups.com, steveseg@... wrote:
          >
          > Matt wondered:
          >
          > When a journey takes so many months, one wonders what two companions
          > would talk about for so long. Do they fall into long periods of quiet,
          > or did Gandalf regale Bilbo with the history of Ea?
          >
          >
          > Steve responds: The possability of such a conversation staggers the
          mind. Mine at least.
          >
          > Steve S.
          >
          > -----Original Message-----
          > From: Matt <tea_party@...>
          > To: TolkienDiscussions@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Mon, 31 Mar 2008 12:22 pm
          > Subject: [TolkienDiscussions] Re: The Hobbit - Chapter Nineteen Summary
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          >
          > It is interesting that Bilbo has such a whimsical title for his
          > memoirs, while Frodo gives his a much more pragmatic one.
          >
          > One wonders what inspired Tolkien to give Bilbo such horrendously
          > awful relatives. Perhaps his own in-laws?? Bilbo's relatives always
          > make me feel uneasy.
          >
          > When a journey takes so many months, one wonders what two companions
          > would talk about for so long. Do they fall into long periods of quiet,
          > or did Gandalf regale Bilbo with the history of Ea?
          >
          > Very few people undertake journeys of this distance on foot anymore.
          > Certainly not for a purpose. Most commonly it is done for recreation.
          > Makes you wonder what it would be like to set out on foot and walk
          > halfway across a continent.
          >
          > Matt West
          >
          > --- In TolkienDiscussions@yahoogroups.com, steveseg@ wrote:
          > >
          > > "The Last Stage" is appropriately enough the nineteenth and last
          > chapter of "The Hobbit."?
          > >
          > > Bilbo and Gandalf had just crossed the Misty Mountains and were
          > making their way to Rivendell, which they reach on May 1st. It is
          > evening as they enter the Last (or First) Homely House and the elves
          > greet the pair in song, as is their way. This particular song
          > celebrates the death of Smaug and the cleansing of nearby lands.
          > >
          > > The hobbit and wizard are then met by a party of elves and taken to
          > the house of Elrond where the pair regaled the household with the
          > details of their adventures since leaving Rivendell on their way to
          > Erebor.
          > >
          > > During the recital, Bilbo learned that Gandalf had been attending a
          > council of white wizards (were there any declared black wizards?),
          > which then drove the Necromancer from Dol Goldur in the south of
          > Mirkwood. Perhaps Sauron was thought of as a Black Wizard though he
          > was actually so much more. Possibly a couple of the Ring Wraiths were
          > once wizards or sorcerers and still practiced their arts. As to the
          > Blue Wizards, they might have turned to the shadow out in the lands to
          > the east of Rhun...
          > >
          > > Bilbo falls asleep soon after the talk of dragons and wizards is
          > ended and awakes in a bed during the night with elves paying him
          > homage in song. The hobbit banters with the elves outside his window
          > before returning to sleep. Within a week Bilbo and Gandalf take leave
          > of Elrond and Rivendell, and begin the last stage of their journey to
          > the Shire. A strong rain accompanies them as Gandalf states "There is
          > a long road yet" and Bilbo responds "But it is the last road."
          > >
          > > Soon the Wild is left behind and Bilbo recalls many of the places
          > along the road where he, Gandalf and the dwarves had journeyed on
          > their way east. This includes the gold hoard of Tom, Bert and bill,
          > the man-eating trolls. Wizard and hobbit split the treasure between
          them.
          > >
          > > As the month of June advanced, so too did the odd pair and finally
          > the Shire is entered and soon thereafter, the Hill in Hobbiton. Bilbo
          > is prompted to poetry at the sight, commenting on how the "roads go
          > ever ever on," hinting at the horrors of the world and the warmth of
          > home, in a cyclical journey.
          > >
          > > The door to Bilbo's home is reached, ending the cycle in its'
          > entirety. To his shock, he finds Bag End overrun with locals removing
          > the contents of his home which they purchased at auction. It takes
          > years for Bilbo to finally resolve the legalities of the situation,
          > with the Sackville-Bagginses proving to be the worst culprits involved.
          > >
          > > Aside from losing some spoons, the hobbit had also lost his
          > respectable reputation, except for a few of the wilder Tooks, from
          > that side. Bilbo is not concerned with the loss of either the spoons
          > or reputation. Well, the spoons might have rankled him a bit more than
          > he led on...
          > >
          > > Bilbo's sword and mail were put on display, at Bag End and a museum,
          > respectively, though surely he retrieved the latter at some point. He
          > took to writing more poetry and visiting elves, though they were
          > probably in transit to Lune, preparatory to leaving Middle-Earth.
          > >
          > > The hobbit even took to writing his memoirs, "There and Back
          > Again,?a Hobbit's Holiday." In fact, some years after his adventures
          > in the Wild, while writing these memoirs, Gandalf shows up with Balin
          > and the trio waste no time in catching up on events during and since
          > their time together. Bard had rebuilt Dale and Lake-town still
          > prospered as well, though the old Master had come to a bad end. The
          > dwarves, men and elves of the region surrounding the Lonely Mountain
          > were mutually allied and this becomes significant during the War of
          > the Ring.
          > >
          > > The chapter and book end with Gandalf saying "You are a very fine
          > person, Mr. Baggins, and I am very fond of you, but you are only quite
          > a little fellow in a wide world after all!" The hobbit laughingly
          > responds "Thank goodness" as he hands the wizard a tobacco-jar.
          > >
          > > Steve S.
          > >
          >
        • Matt
          How many of us can actually afford the luxury of such a walk? How would you pay the bills back home? How would you keep your job? Who among us has the skills
          Message 4 of 13 , Apr 1, 2008
          • 0 Attachment
            How many of us can actually afford the luxury of such a walk? How
            would you pay the bills back home? How would you keep your job? Who
            among us has the skills to obtain food and water, start a fire without
            matches or a lighter, repair clothing and footwear, and so on. Who
            could cross a mountain pass in late summer and sustain themselves?

            I have a lot of outdoor experience, and I can tell you, I do not have
            the ability to survive such a journey.

            One thing that Tolkien does not spend much time on is how his
            characters survive. How do they get water, food, and fire?

            Matt West


            --- In TolkienDiscussions@yahoogroups.com, "John Davis" <mcxg46@...>
            wrote:
            >
            > Hi,
            >
            > I wonder if, like meditation, walking long distances like that can
            be a way
            > of emptying the mind, of returning to a more animal-like state of
            awareness.
            >
            > Which might sound like new-age waffle, but walking every day
            certainly helps
            > clear my thoughts, and I can only imagine that walking all day every
            day
            > would do this but to a far greater degree.
            >
            > I suppose, also, that given both of their long lifespans, and the
            slower
            > pace of life in Middle-earth, a few month's walk would be less
            staggeringly
            > different to their usual existence than it is for us.
            >
            > John
            > ----- Original Message -----
            > From: <steveseg@...>
            > To: <TolkienDiscussions@yahoogroups.com>
            > Sent: Monday, March 31, 2008 5:47 PM
            > Subject: Re: [TolkienDiscussions] Re: The Hobbit - Chapter Nineteen
            Summary
            >
            >
            > > Matt wondered:
            > >
            > > When a journey takes so many months, one wonders what two companions
            > > would talk about for so long. Do they fall into long periods of quiet,
            > > or did Gandalf regale Bilbo with the history of Ea?
            > >
            > >
            > > Steve responds: The possability of such a conversation staggers
            the mind.
            > > Mine at least.
            > >
            > > Steve S.
            > >
            > > -----Original Message-----
            > > From: Matt <tea_party@...>
            > > To: TolkienDiscussions@yahoogroups.com
            > > Sent: Mon, 31 Mar 2008 12:22 pm
            > > Subject: [TolkienDiscussions] Re: The Hobbit - Chapter Nineteen
            Summary
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > It is interesting that Bilbo has such a whimsical title for his
            > > memoirs, while Frodo gives his a much more pragmatic one.
            > >
            > > One wonders what inspired Tolkien to give Bilbo such horrendously
            > > awful relatives. Perhaps his own in-laws?? Bilbo's relatives always
            > > make me feel uneasy.
            > >
            > > When a journey takes so many months, one wonders what two companions
            > > would talk about for so long. Do they fall into long periods of quiet,
            > > or did Gandalf regale Bilbo with the history of Ea?
            > >
            > > Very few people undertake journeys of this distance on foot anymore.
            > > Certainly not for a purpose. Most commonly it is done for recreation.
            > > Makes you wonder what it would be like to set out on foot and walk
            > > halfway across a continent.
            > >
            > > Matt West
            > >
            > > --- In TolkienDiscussions@yahoogroups.com, steveseg@ wrote:
            > >>
            > >> "The Last Stage" is appropriately enough the nineteenth and last
            > > chapter of "The Hobbit."?
            > >>
            > >> Bilbo and Gandalf had just crossed the Misty Mountains and were
            > > making their way to Rivendell, which they reach on May 1st. It is
            > > evening as they enter the Last (or First) Homely House and the elves
            > > greet the pair in song, as is their way. This particular song
            > > celebrates the death of Smaug and the cleansing of nearby lands.
            > >>
            > >> The hobbit and wizard are then met by a party of elves and taken to
            > > the house of Elrond where the pair regaled the household with the
            > > details of their adventures since leaving Rivendell on their way to
            > > Erebor.
            > >>
            > >> During the recital, Bilbo learned that Gandalf had been attending a
            > > council of white wizards (were there any declared black wizards?),
            > > which then drove the Necromancer from Dol Goldur in the south of
            > > Mirkwood. Perhaps Sauron was thought of as a Black Wizard though he
            > > was actually so much more. Possibly a couple of the Ring Wraiths were
            > > once wizards or sorcerers and still practiced their arts. As to the
            > > Blue Wizards, they might have turned to the shadow out in the lands to
            > > the east of Rhun...
            > >>
            > >> Bilbo falls asleep soon after the talk of dragons and wizards is
            > > ended and awakes in a bed during the night with elves paying him
            > > homage in song. The hobbit banters with the elves outside his window
            > > before returning to sleep. Within a week Bilbo and Gandalf take leave
            > > of Elrond and Rivendell, and begin the last stage of their journey to
            > > the Shire. A strong rain accompanies them as Gandalf states "There is
            > > a long road yet" and Bilbo responds "But it is the last road."
            > >>
            > >> Soon the Wild is left behind and Bilbo recalls many of the places
            > > along the road where he, Gandalf and the dwarves had journeyed on
            > > their way east. This includes the gold hoard of Tom, Bert and bill,
            > > the man-eating trolls. Wizard and hobbit split the treasure
            between them.
            > >>
            > >> As the month of June advanced, so too did the odd pair and finally
            > > the Shire is entered and soon thereafter, the Hill in Hobbiton. Bilbo
            > > is prompted to poetry at the sight, commenting on how the "roads go
            > > ever ever on," hinting at the horrors of the world and the warmth of
            > > home, in a cyclical journey.
            > >>
            > >> The door to Bilbo's home is reached, ending the cycle in its'
            > > entirety. To his shock, he finds Bag End overrun with locals removing
            > > the contents of his home which they purchased at auction. It takes
            > > years for Bilbo to finally resolve the legalities of the situation,
            > > with the Sackville-Bagginses proving to be the worst culprits
            involved.
            > >>
            > >> Aside from losing some spoons, the hobbit had also lost his
            > > respectable reputation, except for a few of the wilder Tooks, from
            > > that side. Bilbo is not concerned with the loss of either the spoons
            > > or reputation. Well, the spoons might have rankled him a bit more than
            > > he led on...
            > >>
            > >> Bilbo's sword and mail were put on display, at Bag End and a museum,
            > > respectively, though surely he retrieved the latter at some point. He
            > > took to writing more poetry and visiting elves, though they were
            > > probably in transit to Lune, preparatory to leaving Middle-Earth.
            > >>
            > >> The hobbit even took to writing his memoirs, "There and Back
            > > Again,?a Hobbit's Holiday." In fact, some years after his adventures
            > > in the Wild, while writing these memoirs, Gandalf shows up with Balin
            > > and the trio waste no time in catching up on events during and since
            > > their time together. Bard had rebuilt Dale and Lake-town still
            > > prospered as well, though the old Master had come to a bad end. The
            > > dwarves, men and elves of the region surrounding the Lonely Mountain
            > > were mutually allied and this becomes significant during the War of
            > > the Ring.
            > >>
            > >> The chapter and book end with Gandalf saying "You are a very fine
            > > person, Mr. Baggins, and I am very fond of you, but you are only quite
            > > a little fellow in a wide world after all!" The hobbit laughingly
            > > responds "Thank goodness" as he hands the wizard a tobacco-jar.
            > >>
            > >> Steve S.
            > >>
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > >
            >
          • John Davis
            Hi, Well, being vegan, I d probably starve in a matter of a week or so! But Hobbits are always portrayed as being faster, quieter, and more atuned with nature
            Message 5 of 13 , Apr 2, 2008
            • 0 Attachment
              Hi,

              Well, being vegan, I'd probably starve in a matter of a week or so!

              But Hobbits are always portrayed as being faster, quieter, and more atuned
              with nature than men, so I would imagine that foraging for food would be
              easy enough for them, especially a newly-hardened Bilbo. As for Gandalf, do
              Istari even need to eat?

              John
              ----- Original Message -----
              From: "Matt" <tea_party@...>
              To: <TolkienDiscussions@yahoogroups.com>
              Sent: Tuesday, April 01, 2008 3:02 PM
              Subject: [TolkienDiscussions] Re: The Hobbit - Chapter Nineteen Summary


              > How many of us can actually afford the luxury of such a walk? How
              > would you pay the bills back home? How would you keep your job? Who
              > among us has the skills to obtain food and water, start a fire without
              > matches or a lighter, repair clothing and footwear, and so on. Who
              > could cross a mountain pass in late summer and sustain themselves?
              >
              > I have a lot of outdoor experience, and I can tell you, I do not have
              > the ability to survive such a journey.
              >
              > One thing that Tolkien does not spend much time on is how his
              > characters survive. How do they get water, food, and fire?
              >
              > Matt West
              >
              >
              > --- In TolkienDiscussions@yahoogroups.com, "John Davis" <mcxg46@...>
              > wrote:
              >>
              >> Hi,
              >>
              >> I wonder if, like meditation, walking long distances like that can
              > be a way
              >> of emptying the mind, of returning to a more animal-like state of
              > awareness.
              >>
              >> Which might sound like new-age waffle, but walking every day
              > certainly helps
              >> clear my thoughts, and I can only imagine that walking all day every
              > day
              >> would do this but to a far greater degree.
              >>
              >> I suppose, also, that given both of their long lifespans, and the
              > slower
              >> pace of life in Middle-earth, a few month's walk would be less
              > staggeringly
              >> different to their usual existence than it is for us.
              >>
              >> John
              >> ----- Original Message -----
              >> From: <steveseg@...>
              >> To: <TolkienDiscussions@yahoogroups.com>
              >> Sent: Monday, March 31, 2008 5:47 PM
              >> Subject: Re: [TolkienDiscussions] Re: The Hobbit - Chapter Nineteen
              > Summary
              >>
              >>
              >> > Matt wondered:
              >> >
              >> > When a journey takes so many months, one wonders what two companions
              >> > would talk about for so long. Do they fall into long periods of quiet,
              >> > or did Gandalf regale Bilbo with the history of Ea?
              >> >
              >> >
              >> > Steve responds: The possability of such a conversation staggers
              > the mind.
              >> > Mine at least.
              >> >
              >> > Steve S.
              >> >
              >> > -----Original Message-----
              >> > From: Matt <tea_party@...>
              >> > To: TolkienDiscussions@yahoogroups.com
              >> > Sent: Mon, 31 Mar 2008 12:22 pm
              >> > Subject: [TolkienDiscussions] Re: The Hobbit - Chapter Nineteen
              > Summary
              >> >
              >> >
              >> >
              >> >
              >> >
              >> >
              >> > It is interesting that Bilbo has such a whimsical title for his
              >> > memoirs, while Frodo gives his a much more pragmatic one.
              >> >
              >> > One wonders what inspired Tolkien to give Bilbo such horrendously
              >> > awful relatives. Perhaps his own in-laws?? Bilbo's relatives always
              >> > make me feel uneasy.
              >> >
              >> > When a journey takes so many months, one wonders what two companions
              >> > would talk about for so long. Do they fall into long periods of quiet,
              >> > or did Gandalf regale Bilbo with the history of Ea?
              >> >
              >> > Very few people undertake journeys of this distance on foot anymore.
              >> > Certainly not for a purpose. Most commonly it is done for recreation.
              >> > Makes you wonder what it would be like to set out on foot and walk
              >> > halfway across a continent.
              >> >
              >> > Matt West
              >> >
              >> > --- In TolkienDiscussions@yahoogroups.com, steveseg@ wrote:
              >> >>
              >> >> "The Last Stage" is appropriately enough the nineteenth and last
              >> > chapter of "The Hobbit."?
              >> >>
              >> >> Bilbo and Gandalf had just crossed the Misty Mountains and were
              >> > making their way to Rivendell, which they reach on May 1st. It is
              >> > evening as they enter the Last (or First) Homely House and the elves
              >> > greet the pair in song, as is their way. This particular song
              >> > celebrates the death of Smaug and the cleansing of nearby lands.
              >> >>
              >> >> The hobbit and wizard are then met by a party of elves and taken to
              >> > the house of Elrond where the pair regaled the household with the
              >> > details of their adventures since leaving Rivendell on their way to
              >> > Erebor.
              >> >>
              >> >> During the recital, Bilbo learned that Gandalf had been attending a
              >> > council of white wizards (were there any declared black wizards?),
              >> > which then drove the Necromancer from Dol Goldur in the south of
              >> > Mirkwood. Perhaps Sauron was thought of as a Black Wizard though he
              >> > was actually so much more. Possibly a couple of the Ring Wraiths were
              >> > once wizards or sorcerers and still practiced their arts. As to the
              >> > Blue Wizards, they might have turned to the shadow out in the lands to
              >> > the east of Rhun...
              >> >>
              >> >> Bilbo falls asleep soon after the talk of dragons and wizards is
              >> > ended and awakes in a bed during the night with elves paying him
              >> > homage in song. The hobbit banters with the elves outside his window
              >> > before returning to sleep. Within a week Bilbo and Gandalf take leave
              >> > of Elrond and Rivendell, and begin the last stage of their journey to
              >> > the Shire. A strong rain accompanies them as Gandalf states "There is
              >> > a long road yet" and Bilbo responds "But it is the last road."
              >> >>
              >> >> Soon the Wild is left behind and Bilbo recalls many of the places
              >> > along the road where he, Gandalf and the dwarves had journeyed on
              >> > their way east. This includes the gold hoard of Tom, Bert and bill,
              >> > the man-eating trolls. Wizard and hobbit split the treasure
              > between them.
              >> >>
              >> >> As the month of June advanced, so too did the odd pair and finally
              >> > the Shire is entered and soon thereafter, the Hill in Hobbiton. Bilbo
              >> > is prompted to poetry at the sight, commenting on how the "roads go
              >> > ever ever on," hinting at the horrors of the world and the warmth of
              >> > home, in a cyclical journey.
              >> >>
              >> >> The door to Bilbo's home is reached, ending the cycle in its'
              >> > entirety. To his shock, he finds Bag End overrun with locals removing
              >> > the contents of his home which they purchased at auction. It takes
              >> > years for Bilbo to finally resolve the legalities of the situation,
              >> > with the Sackville-Bagginses proving to be the worst culprits
              > involved.
              >> >>
              >> >> Aside from losing some spoons, the hobbit had also lost his
              >> > respectable reputation, except for a few of the wilder Tooks, from
              >> > that side. Bilbo is not concerned with the loss of either the spoons
              >> > or reputation. Well, the spoons might have rankled him a bit more than
              >> > he led on...
              >> >>
              >> >> Bilbo's sword and mail were put on display, at Bag End and a museum,
              >> > respectively, though surely he retrieved the latter at some point. He
              >> > took to writing more poetry and visiting elves, though they were
              >> > probably in transit to Lune, preparatory to leaving Middle-Earth.
              >> >>
              >> >> The hobbit even took to writing his memoirs, "There and Back
              >> > Again,?a Hobbit's Holiday." In fact, some years after his adventures
              >> > in the Wild, while writing these memoirs, Gandalf shows up with Balin
              >> > and the trio waste no time in catching up on events during and since
              >> > their time together. Bard had rebuilt Dale and Lake-town still
              >> > prospered as well, though the old Master had come to a bad end. The
              >> > dwarves, men and elves of the region surrounding the Lonely Mountain
              >> > were mutually allied and this becomes significant during the War of
              >> > the Ring.
              >> >>
              >> >> The chapter and book end with Gandalf saying "You are a very fine
              >> > person, Mr. Baggins, and I am very fond of you, but you are only quite
              >> > a little fellow in a wide world after all!" The hobbit laughingly
              >> > responds "Thank goodness" as he hands the wizard a tobacco-jar.
              >> >>
              >> >> Steve S.
              >> >>
              >> >
              >> >
              >> >
              >> >
              >> >
              >>
              >
              >
              >
              > ------------------------------------
              >
              > Come and visit our Tolkien Discussions group online and take advantage
              > of our Messages, Chat, Files, Photos, Links, Database, Polls, Members,
              > and Calendar sections.
              > http://groups.yahoo.com/group/TolkienDiscussions
              > Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
            • Jack
              No cars, no bicycles - relatively few horses Before the bike was invented, most people did not travel very far. ... Jack... _____ From:
              Message 6 of 13 , Apr 2, 2008
              • 0 Attachment

                No cars, no bicycles – relatively few horses

                 

                Before the bike was invented, most people did not travel very far. 

                 

                :o)
                Jack
                ...


                From: TolkienDiscussions@yahoogroups.com [mailto: TolkienDiscussions@yahoogroups.com ] On Behalf Of John Davis
                Sent: 01 April 2008 08:39
                To: TolkienDiscussions@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: Re: [TolkienDiscussions] Re: The Hobbit - Chapter Nineteen Summary

                 

                Hi,

                I wonder if, like meditation, walking long distances like that can be a way
                of emptying the mind, of returning to a more animal-like state of awareness.

                Which might sound like new-age waffle, but walking every day certainly helps
                clear my thoughts, and I can only imagine that walking all day every day
                would do this but to a far greater degree.

                I suppose, also, that given both of their long lifespans, and the slower
                pace of life in Middle-earth, a few month's walk would be less staggeringly
                different to their usual existence than it is for us.

                John

                ----- Original Message -----
                From: <steveseg@aol. com>
                To: <TolkienDiscussions@ yahoogroups. com>
                Sent: Monday, March 31, 2008 5:47 PM
                Subject: Re: [TolkienDiscussions ] Re: The Hobbit - Chapter Nineteen Summary

                > Matt wondered:
                >
                > When a journey takes so many months, one wonders what two companions
                > would talk about for so long. Do they fall into long periods of quiet,
                > or did Gandalf regale Bilbo with the history of Ea?
                >
                >
                > Steve responds: The possability of such a conversation staggers the mind.
                > Mine at least.
                >
                > Steve S.
                >
                > -----Original Message-----
                > From: Matt <tea_party@ourbrisba ne.com>
                > To: TolkienDiscussions@ yahoogroups. com
                > Sent: Mon, 31 Mar 2008 12:22 pm
                > Subject: [TolkienDiscussions ] Re: The Hobbit - Chapter Nineteen Summary
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > It is interesting that Bilbo has such a whimsical title for his
                > memoirs, while Frodo gives his a much more pragmatic one.
                >
                > One wonders what inspired Tolkien to give Bilbo such horrendously
                > awful relatives. Perhaps his own in-laws?? Bilbo's relatives always
                > make me feel uneasy.
                >
                > When a journey takes so many months, one wonders what two companions
                > would talk about for so long. Do they fall into long periods of quiet,
                > or did Gandalf regale Bilbo with the history of Ea?
                >
                > Very few people undertake journeys of this distance on foot anymore.
                > Certainly not for a purpose. Most commonly it is done for recreation.
                > Makes you wonder what it would be like to set out on foot and walk
                > halfway across a continent.
                >
                > Matt West
                >
                > --- In TolkienDiscussions@ yahoogroups. com, steveseg@... wrote:
                >>
                >> "The Last Stage" is appropriately enough the nineteenth and last
                > chapter of "The Hobbit."?
                >>
                >> Bilbo and Gandalf had just crossed the Misty Mountains and were
                > making their way to Rivendell, which they reach on May 1st. It is
                > evening as they enter the Last (or First) Homely House and the elves
                > greet the pair in song, as is their way. This particular song
                > celebrates the death of Smaug and the cleansing of nearby lands.
                >>
                >> The hobbit and wizard are then met by a party of elves and taken to
                > the house of Elrond where the pair regaled the household with the
                > details of their adventures since leaving Rivendell on their way to
                > Erebor.
                >>
                >> During the recital, Bilbo learned that Gandalf had been attending a
                > council of white wizards (were there any declared black wizards?),
                > which then drove the Necromancer from Dol Goldur in the south of
                > Mirkwood. Perhaps Sauron was thought of as a Black Wizard though he
                > was actually so much more. Possibly a couple of the Ring Wraiths were
                > once wizards or sorcerers and still practiced their arts. As to the
                > Blue Wizards, they might have turned to the shadow out in the lands to
                > the east of Rhun...
                >>
                >> Bilbo falls asleep soon after the talk of dragons and wizards is
                > ended and awakes in a bed during the night with elves paying him
                > homage in song. The hobbit banters with the elves outside his window
                > before returning to sleep. Within a week Bilbo and Gandalf take leave
                > of Elrond and Rivendell, and begin the last stage of their journey to
                > the Shire. A strong rain accompanies them as Gandalf states "There is
                > a long road yet" and Bilbo responds "But it is the last road."
                >>
                >> Soon the Wild is left behind and Bilbo recalls many of the places
                > along the road where he, Gandalf and the dwarves had journeyed on
                > their way east. This includes the gold hoard of Tom, Bert and bill,
                > the man-eating trolls. Wizard and hobbit split the treasure between them.
                >>
                >> As the month of June advanced, so too did the odd pair and finally
                > the Shire is entered and soon thereafter, the Hill in Hobbiton. Bilbo
                > is prompted to poetry at the sight, commenting on how the "roads go
                > ever ever on," hinting at the horrors of the world and the warmth of
                > home, in a cyclical journey.
                >>
                >> The door to Bilbo's home is reached, ending the cycle in its'
                > entirety. To his shock, he finds Bag End overrun with locals removing
                > the contents of his home which they purchased at auction. It takes
                > years for Bilbo to finally resolve the legalities of the situation,
                > with the Sackville-Bagginses proving to be the worst culprits involved.
                >>
                >> Aside from losing some spoons, the hobbit had also lost his
                > respectable reputation, except for a few of the wilder Tooks, from
                > that side. Bilbo is not concerned with the loss of either the spoons
                > or reputation. Well, the spoons might have rankled him a bit more than
                > he led on...
                >>
                >> Bilbo's sword and mail were put on display, at Bag End and a museum,
                > respectively, though surely he retrieved the latter at some point. He
                > took to writing more poetry and visiting elves, though they were
                > probably in transit to Lune, preparatory to leaving Middle-Earth.
                >>
                >> The hobbit even took to writing his memoirs, "There and Back
                > Again,?a Hobbit's Holiday ." In fact, some years after his adventures
                > in the Wild, while writing these memoirs, Gandalf shows up with Balin
                > and the trio waste no time in catching up on events during and since
                > their time together. Bard had rebuilt Dale and Lake-town still
                > prospered as well, though the old Master had come to a bad end. The
                > dwarves, men and elves of the region surrounding the Lonely Mountain
                > were mutually allied and this becomes significant during the War of
                > the Ring.
                >>
                >> The chapter and book end with Gandalf saying "You are a very fine
                > person, Mr. Baggins, and I am very fond of you, but you are only quite
                > a little fellow in a wide world after all!" The hobbit laughingly
                > responds "Thank goodness" as he hands the wizard a tobacco-jar.
                >>
                >> Steve S.
                >>
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >

              • Bruce Alan Wilson
                As for Istari needing to eat, JRRT says that one of the limitations put on them was that they had the same physical needs as the Children of Illuvatar. I
                Message 7 of 13 , Apr 2, 2008
                • 0 Attachment
                  Re: The Hobbit - Chapter Nineteen Summary

                  As for Istari needing to eat, JRRT says that one of the limitations put on them was that they had the same physical needs as the Children of Illuvatar.  I presume that would include needing to eat.

                  And he does talk about their food supplies growing low in Mirkwood, about Bilbo gathering herbs and fruits when they were going down the other side of the mountains, of Elrond and Beorn resupplying their foodstuffs, and it says that dwarves are very good at starting fires in all but the worst conditions and that Dori and Ori were good at it even for Dwarves.  (And, of course, if worse comes to worse for most of the trip they had a firemage!)  He doesn't go on and on about it like David Eddings does (hurrah!)

                  Bruce Alan Wilson

                  "The bicycle is the most civilized conveyance known to man.  Other forms of transport grow daily more nightmarish.  Only the bicycle remains pure in heart."--Iris Murdoch

                • mbranparker
                  Simply Wonderful.....thank you 8) ... chapter of The Hobbit. ? ... making their way to Rivendell, which they reach on May 1st. It is evening as they enter the
                  Message 8 of 13 , Apr 2, 2008
                  • 0 Attachment
                    Simply Wonderful.....thank you 8)
                    --- In TolkienDiscussions@yahoogroups.com, steveseg@... wrote:
                    >
                    > "The Last Stage" is appropriately enough the nineteenth and last
                    chapter of "The Hobbit."?
                    >
                    > Bilbo and Gandalf had just crossed the Misty Mountains and were
                    making their way to Rivendell, which they reach on May 1st. It is
                    evening as they enter the Last (or First) Homely House and the elves
                    greet the pair in song, as is their way. This particular song
                    celebrates the death of Smaug and the cleansing of nearby lands.
                    >
                    > The hobbit and wizard are then met by a party of elves and taken to
                    the house of Elrond where the pair regaled the household with the
                    details of their adventures since leaving Rivendell on their way to
                    Erebor.
                    >
                    > During the recital, Bilbo learned that Gandalf had been attending a
                    council of white wizards (were there any declared black wizards?),
                    which then drove the Necromancer from Dol Goldur in the south of
                    Mirkwood. Perhaps Sauron was thought of as a Black Wizard though he
                    was actually so much more. Possibly a couple of the Ring Wraiths were
                    once wizards or sorcerers and still practiced their arts. As to the
                    Blue Wizards, they might have turned to the shadow out in the lands
                    to the east of Rhun...
                    >
                    > Bilbo falls asleep soon after the talk of dragons and wizards is
                    ended and awakes in a bed during the night with elves paying him
                    homage in song. The hobbit banters with the elves outside his window
                    before returning to sleep. Within a week Bilbo and Gandalf take leave
                    of Elrond and Rivendell, and begin the last stage of their journey to
                    the Shire. A strong rain accompanies them as Gandalf states "There is
                    a long road yet" and Bilbo responds "But it is the last road."
                    >
                    > Soon the Wild is left behind and Bilbo recalls many of the places
                    along the road where he, Gandalf and the dwarves had journeyed on
                    their way east. This includes the gold hoard of Tom, Bert and bill,
                    the man-eating trolls. Wizard and hobbit split the treasure between
                    them.
                    >
                    > As the month of June advanced, so too did the odd pair and finally
                    the Shire is entered and soon thereafter, the Hill in Hobbiton. Bilbo
                    is prompted to poetry at the sight, commenting on how the "roads go
                    ever ever on," hinting at the horrors of the world and the warmth of
                    home, in a cyclical journey.
                    >
                    > The door to Bilbo's home is reached, ending the cycle in its'
                    entirety. To his shock, he finds Bag End overrun with locals removing
                    the contents of his home which they purchased at auction. It takes
                    years for Bilbo to finally resolve the legalities of the situation,
                    with the Sackville-Bagginses proving to be the worst culprits
                    involved.
                    >
                    > Aside from losing some spoons, the hobbit had also lost his
                    respectable reputation, except for a few of the wilder Tooks, from
                    that side. Bilbo is not concerned with the loss of either the spoons
                    or reputation. Well, the spoons might have rankled him a bit more
                    than he led on...
                    >
                    > Bilbo's sword and mail were put on display, at Bag End and a
                    museum, respectively, though surely he retrieved the latter at some
                    point. He took to writing more poetry and visiting elves, though they
                    were probably in transit to Lune, preparatory to leaving Middle-Earth.
                    >
                    > The hobbit even took to writing his memoirs, "There and Back Again,?
                    a Hobbit's Holiday." In fact, some years after his adventures in the
                    Wild, while writing these memoirs, Gandalf shows up with Balin and
                    the trio waste no time in catching up on events during and since
                    their time together. Bard had rebuilt Dale and Lake-town still
                    prospered as well, though the old Master had come to a bad end. The
                    dwarves, men and elves of the region surrounding the Lonely Mountain
                    were mutually allied and this becomes significant during the War of
                    the Ring.
                    >
                    > The chapter and book end with Gandalf saying "You are a very fine
                    person, Mr. Baggins, and I am very fond of you, but you are only
                    quite a little fellow in a wide world after all!" The hobbit
                    laughingly responds "Thank goodness" as he hands the wizard a tobacco-
                    jar.
                    >
                    > Steve S.
                    >
                  • Matt
                    Ancestral humans did travel a lot. In primitive times they followed herds around or journeyed from villages to hunting grounds. Our most primitive ancestors
                    Message 9 of 13 , Apr 3, 2008
                    • 0 Attachment
                      Ancestral humans did travel a lot. In primitive times they followed
                      herds around or journeyed from villages to hunting grounds. Our most
                      primitive ancestors walked out of Africa and spread across the entire
                      globe, all on foot. In ancient times, pilgrims traveled for years to
                      visit religious sites. Armies swept across Europe, Asia, and Northern
                      Africa on foot or horseback. Roads connected the Middle-east to
                      central and Eastern Asia. People traversed these great distances on
                      foot, camel, and horse to exchange goods, conquer new lands, and
                      conduct pilgrimages. Sea faring peoples traveled ever farther. Ships
                      plied the coasts of Europe, North America, Africa, the Mediterranean,
                      and the South China Sea. Europeans crossed the North American
                      continent in wagons and on horseback. Asian migrants populated North
                      and South America entirely on foot or in relatively primitive boats.
                      Australian aboriginals sailed to Australia from SE Asia. They
                      regularly crossed the continent following annual cycles. South seas
                      peoples traversed the oceans in primitive boats and populated islands
                      scattered all over the Pacific ocean.

                      When journeys were undertaken, they lasted months or years, not hours
                      or days.

                      I think that humans have lost the skills needed to survive on long
                      journeys. Of course, we have also all but wiped out the natural food
                      supply. If it weren't for agriculture, we'd still be wandering the
                      Earth as a relatively insignificant bi-pedal mammal.

                      Matt West


                      --- In TolkienDiscussions@yahoogroups.com, "Jack" <jck@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > No cars, no bicycles - relatively few horses
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Before the bike was invented, most people did not travel very far.
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > :o)
                      > Jack...
                      >
                      > _____
                      >
                      > From: TolkienDiscussions@yahoogroups.com
                      > [mailto:TolkienDiscussions@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of John Davis
                      > Sent: 01 April 2008 08:39
                      > To: TolkienDiscussions@yahoogroups.com
                      > Subject: Re: [TolkienDiscussions] Re: The Hobbit - Chapter Nineteen
                      Summary
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > Hi,
                      >
                      > I wonder if, like meditation, walking long distances like that can
                      be a way
                      > of emptying the mind, of returning to a more animal-like state of
                      awareness.
                      >
                      > Which might sound like new-age waffle, but walking every day
                      certainly helps
                      >
                      > clear my thoughts, and I can only imagine that walking all day every
                      day
                      > would do this but to a far greater degree.
                      >
                      > I suppose, also, that given both of their long lifespans, and the
                      slower
                      > pace of life in Middle-earth, a few month's walk would be less
                      staggeringly
                      > different to their usual existence than it is for us.
                      >
                      > John
                      > ----- Original Message -----
                      > From: <steveseg@aol. <mailto:steveseg%40aol.com> com>
                      > To: <TolkienDiscussions@ <mailto:TolkienDiscussions%40yahoogroups.com>
                      > yahoogroups.com>
                      > Sent: Monday, March 31, 2008 5:47 PM
                      > Subject: Re: [TolkienDiscussions] Re: The Hobbit - Chapter Nineteen
                      Summary
                      >
                      > > Matt wondered:
                      > >
                      > > When a journey takes so many months, one wonders what two companions
                      > > would talk about for so long. Do they fall into long periods of quiet,
                      > > or did Gandalf regale Bilbo with the history of Ea?
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > Steve responds: The possability of such a conversation staggers
                      the mind.
                      > > Mine at least.
                      > >
                      > > Steve S.
                      > >
                      > > -----Original Message-----
                      > > From: Matt <tea_party@ourbrisba <mailto:tea_party%40ourbrisbane.com>
                      > ne.com>
                      > > To: TolkienDiscussions@ <mailto:TolkienDiscussions%40yahoogroups.com>
                      > yahoogroups.com
                      > > Sent: Mon, 31 Mar 2008 12:22 pm
                      > > Subject: [TolkienDiscussions] Re: The Hobbit - Chapter Nineteen
                      Summary
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > > It is interesting that Bilbo has such a whimsical title for his
                      > > memoirs, while Frodo gives his a much more pragmatic one.
                      > >
                      > > One wonders what inspired Tolkien to give Bilbo such horrendously
                      > > awful relatives. Perhaps his own in-laws?? Bilbo's relatives always
                      > > make me feel uneasy.
                      > >
                      > > When a journey takes so many months, one wonders what two companions
                      > > would talk about for so long. Do they fall into long periods of quiet,
                      > > or did Gandalf regale Bilbo with the history of Ea?
                      > >
                      > > Very few people undertake journeys of this distance on foot anymore.
                      > > Certainly not for a purpose. Most commonly it is done for recreation.
                      > > Makes you wonder what it would be like to set out on foot and walk
                      > > halfway across a continent.
                      > >
                      > > Matt West
                      > >
                      > > --- In TolkienDiscussions@
                      <mailto:TolkienDiscussions%40yahoogroups.com>
                      > yahoogroups.com, steveseg@ wrote:
                      > >>
                      > >> "The Last Stage" is appropriately enough the nineteenth and last
                      > > chapter of "The Hobbit."?
                      > >>
                      > >> Bilbo and Gandalf had just crossed the Misty Mountains and were
                      > > making their way to Rivendell, which they reach on May 1st. It is
                      > > evening as they enter the Last (or First) Homely House and the elves
                      > > greet the pair in song, as is their way. This particular song
                      > > celebrates the death of Smaug and the cleansing of nearby lands.
                      > >>
                      > >> The hobbit and wizard are then met by a party of elves and taken to
                      > > the house of Elrond where the pair regaled the household with the
                      > > details of their adventures since leaving Rivendell on their way to
                      > > Erebor.
                      > >>
                      > >> During the recital, Bilbo learned that Gandalf had been attending a
                      > > council of white wizards (were there any declared black wizards?),
                      > > which then drove the Necromancer from Dol Goldur in the south of
                      > > Mirkwood. Perhaps Sauron was thought of as a Black Wizard though he
                      > > was actually so much more. Possibly a couple of the Ring Wraiths were
                      > > once wizards or sorcerers and still practiced their arts. As to the
                      > > Blue Wizards, they might have turned to the shadow out in the lands to
                      > > the east of Rhun...
                      > >>
                      > >> Bilbo falls asleep soon after the talk of dragons and wizards is
                      > > ended and awakes in a bed during the night with elves paying him
                      > > homage in song. The hobbit banters with the elves outside his window
                      > > before returning to sleep. Within a week Bilbo and Gandalf take leave
                      > > of Elrond and Rivendell, and begin the last stage of their journey to
                      > > the Shire. A strong rain accompanies them as Gandalf states "There is
                      > > a long road yet" and Bilbo responds "But it is the last road."
                      > >>
                      > >> Soon the Wild is left behind and Bilbo recalls many of the places
                      > > along the road where he, Gandalf and the dwarves had journeyed on
                      > > their way east. This includes the gold hoard of Tom, Bert and bill,
                      > > the man-eating trolls. Wizard and hobbit split the treasure
                      between them.
                      > >>
                      > >> As the month of June advanced, so too did the odd pair and finally
                      > > the Shire is entered and soon thereafter, the Hill in Hobbiton. Bilbo
                      > > is prompted to poetry at the sight, commenting on how the "roads go
                      > > ever ever on," hinting at the horrors of the world and the warmth of
                      > > home, in a cyclical journey.
                      > >>
                      > >> The door to Bilbo's home is reached, ending the cycle in its'
                      > > entirety. To his shock, he finds Bag End overrun with locals removing
                      > > the contents of his home which they purchased at auction. It takes
                      > > years for Bilbo to finally resolve the legalities of the situation,
                      > > with the Sackville-Bagginses proving to be the worst culprits
                      involved.
                      > >>
                      > >> Aside from losing some spoons, the hobbit had also lost his
                      > > respectable reputation, except for a few of the wilder Tooks, from
                      > > that side. Bilbo is not concerned with the loss of either the spoons
                      > > or reputation. Well, the spoons might have rankled him a bit more than
                      > > he led on...
                      > >>
                      > >> Bilbo's sword and mail were put on display, at Bag End and a museum,
                      > > respectively, though surely he retrieved the latter at some point. He
                      > > took to writing more poetry and visiting elves, though they were
                      > > probably in transit to Lune, preparatory to leaving Middle-Earth.
                      > >>
                      > >> The hobbit even took to writing his memoirs, "There and Back
                      > > Again,?a Hobbit's Holiday." In fact, some years after his adventures
                      > > in the Wild, while writing these memoirs, Gandalf shows up with Balin
                      > > and the trio waste no time in catching up on events during and since
                      > > their time together. Bard had rebuilt Dale and Lake-town still
                      > > prospered as well, though the old Master had come to a bad end. The
                      > > dwarves, men and elves of the region surrounding the Lonely Mountain
                      > > were mutually allied and this becomes significant during the War of
                      > > the Ring.
                      > >>
                      > >> The chapter and book end with Gandalf saying "You are a very fine
                      > > person, Mr. Baggins, and I am very fond of you, but you are only quite
                      > > a little fellow in a wide world after all!" The hobbit laughingly
                      > > responds "Thank goodness" as he hands the wizard a tobacco-jar.
                      > >>
                      > >> Steve S.
                      > >>
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      > >
                      >
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