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Problem with age of Frodo...

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  • Mike Hayes
    I thought after watching the movies very carefully, that the Return of the King was the strongest of the three in capturing the spirit of the books. But I
    Message 1 of 4 , Apr 2, 2005
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      I thought after watching the movies very carefully, that the Return
      of the King was the strongest of the three in capturing the spirit of
      the books. But I thought the Fellowship of the Ring was terribly
      under-spirited. Some of the key and most poignant moments in the
      book for the hobbits are nowhere to be found in the movies.

      One of the things I think Tolkien would have had the most problem
      with in all the movies is the age of Frodo.

      It has been argued that since Frodo was in possession of the ring for
      so many years like Bilbo, that he too would have stayed very young.
      Therefore Elijah Wood portraying Frodo is accurate.

      I don't think this is so. Frodo did not use the ring to the extent
      that Frodo did. It was the extended USE of the ring that preserved
      Bilbo's age more than just having it in his house.

      When Frodo finally left on the quest to destroy the Ring, he is in
      his fifties in the books. Elijah Wood was 19 when he made the movies.

      I think this is one of the biggest flaws in the films. Frodo was no
      youth when he set out to destroy the ring. In fact, if you read the
      books, he is QUITE a different character than as portrayed in the
      movies.

      I don't think the mere possession of the ring would preserve his age
      the way it preserved Bilbo's, not to that extent.
    • elaine
      Hi, all, a bit new here, been lurking to see how y all get along. I think part of the reason for the feeling of under-spiritedness was that so much of the book
      Message 2 of 4 , Apr 2, 2005
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        Hi, all, a bit new here, been lurking to see how y'all get along.

        I think part of the reason for the feeling of under-spiritedness was
        that so much of the book was not used in the first movie. There's a lot
        of character introduction (and building) that goes on during the journey
        from Bag End to Bree, and much of it was not used. This makes some
        points confusing. There's no explanation of why in the world Merry and
        Pippin dropped everything and tagged along to Bree, and then Rivendell.
        There's no sense of friendship, kinship or even of them KNOWING Frodo.

        As for Frodo's age, he supposedly 'came of age' at the very beginning of
        the book, but then many years passed before he learned of the ring's
        history. In the movie, they didn't have time for that, so set him out
        as soon as reasonably possible for Gandalf to learn the truth and tell
        him. It's also simple Hollywood rules. Young male actors sell movies
        better than middle-aged, short, pudgy ones.

        Elaine



        Mike Hayes wrote:
        >
        > I thought after watching the movies very carefully, that the Return
        > of the King was the strongest of the three in capturing the spirit of
        > the books. But I thought the Fellowship of the Ring was terribly
        > under-spirited. Some of the key and most poignant moments in the
        > book for the hobbits are nowhere to be found in the movies.
        >
        > One of the things I think Tolkien would have had the most problem
        > with in all the movies is the age of Frodo.
        >
        > It has been argued that since Frodo was in possession of the ring for
        > so many years like Bilbo, that he too would have stayed very young.
        > Therefore Elijah Wood portraying Frodo is accurate.
        >
        > I don't think this is so. Frodo did not use the ring to the extent
        > that Frodo did. It was the extended USE of the ring that preserved
        > Bilbo's age more than just having it in his house.
        >
        > When Frodo finally left on the quest to destroy the Ring, he is in
        > his fifties in the books. Elijah Wood was 19 when he made the movies.
        >
        > I think this is one of the biggest flaws in the films. Frodo was no
        > youth when he set out to destroy the ring. In fact, if you read the
        > books, he is QUITE a different character than as portrayed in the
        > movies.
        >
        > I don't think the mere possession of the ring would preserve his age
        > the way it preserved Bilbo's, not to that extent.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
      • George
        I agree and disagree. I agree that the length of time between when Gandalf leaves the night of the party and when he returns to tell Frodo to go to Bree is
        Message 3 of 4 , Apr 2, 2005
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          I agree and disagree. I agree that the length of time between when
          Gandalf leaves the night of the party and when he returns to tell
          Frodo to go to Bree is not adequately describes. However, Hobbits are
          not humans and do not nessasarilly age the same way. I was under the
          impression that they age slower and I think that Elijah Wood's
          portrayal in terms of age profile was fine. They were consistant as
          Merry, Pippen and Sam (all of whom are somewhat younger than Frodo)
          all look younger than what we would expect a human to look like at
          their ages. Also, in the introduction, Bilbo is shown picking up the
          Ring in Gollum's cave and he looks very young though he is fifty as
          was Frodo during his adventure.

          ~George







          --- In TolkienDiscussions@yahoogroups.com, "Mike Hayes"
          <MRGRANT1863@a...> wrote:
          >
          > I thought after watching the movies very carefully, that the Return
          > of the King was the strongest of the three in capturing the spirit of
          > the books. But I thought the Fellowship of the Ring was terribly
          > under-spirited. Some of the key and most poignant moments in the
          > book for the hobbits are nowhere to be found in the movies.
          >
          > One of the things I think Tolkien would have had the most problem
          > with in all the movies is the age of Frodo.
          >
          > It has been argued that since Frodo was in possession of the ring for
          > so many years like Bilbo, that he too would have stayed very young.
          > Therefore Elijah Wood portraying Frodo is accurate.
          >
          > I don't think this is so. Frodo did not use the ring to the extent
          > that Frodo did. It was the extended USE of the ring that preserved
          > Bilbo's age more than just having it in his house.
          >
          > When Frodo finally left on the quest to destroy the Ring, he is in
          > his fifties in the books. Elijah Wood was 19 when he made the movies.
          >
          > I think this is one of the biggest flaws in the films. Frodo was no
          > youth when he set out to destroy the ring. In fact, if you read the
          > books, he is QUITE a different character than as portrayed in the
          > movies.
          >
          > I don't think the mere possession of the ring would preserve his age
          > the way it preserved Bilbo's, not to that extent.
        • Wilson, Bruce
          The book quite clearly says that Frodo didn t age after Bilbo left. It was subject to commentary in the Hobbiton area-- Some folks have all the luck.
          Message 4 of 4 , Apr 4, 2005
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            The book quite clearly says that Frodo didn't age after Bilbo left. It
            was subject to commentary in the Hobbiton area--"Some folks have all the
            luck." (Because Bilbo didn't age from 50 to 111.)

            -----Original Message-----
            From: elaine [mailto:elaine@...]
            Sent: Saturday, April 02, 2005 10:04 PM
            To: TolkienDiscussions@yahoogroups.com
            Subject: Re: [TolkienDiscussions] Problem with age of Frodo...




            Mike Hayes wrote:
            >>
            > It has been argued that since Frodo was in possession of the ring for
            > so many years like Bilbo, that he too would have stayed very young.
            > Therefore Elijah Wood portraying Frodo is accurate.
            >
            > I don't think this is so. Frodo did not use the ring to the extent
            > that Frodo did. It was the extended USE of the ring that preserved
            > Bilbo's age more than just having it in his house.



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