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RE: [?? Probable Spam] [Thecoachingnetwork] When is it OK to give a Pay rise??

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  • Mollel, Vivian
    Dear All, Here at SNV we do have the COLA and a step increase in the salary scale for good performers. I like the pragmatic solutions suggested by Charles , my
    Message 1 of 28 , Feb 8, 2013
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      Dear All,

       

      Here at SNV we do have the COLA and a step increase in the salary scale for good performers.

       

      I like the pragmatic solutions suggested by Charles , my only question to Charles is how do you help an employee discover what their passion is and encourage them to have their own business. I envision a lot of questions coming my way as I lack the business advisory skills.

       

      Kind regards

       

      Vivi

       

       

      From: Thecoachingnetwork@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Thecoachingnetwork@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Eyomu Charles
      Sent: 08 February 2013 12:33
      To: Thecoachingnetwork@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: RE: [?? Probable Spam] [Thecoachingnetwork] When is it OK to give a Pay rise??

       

       

      Dear Isaac,
      The combination below can work well with profit making organizations. It may also also work with some NGOs except that NGOs are donor funded and salaries seem to be fixed with few increments at the end of each year. For profit making companies that sell products like sodas or milk, employees can be allocated those products at retail or factory prices for them to find somebody to buy and share the profits or learn to do business themselves. Representatives of employees with support from national unions must advocate for this and companies must help employees to beat inflation. BAT, Soda and Soap selling companies can lead in this.
      Secondly the managers of the economy and bank of Uganda officials in most cases don't tell us the truth about the cost of living index. This is so because most of bank of Uganda officials want to keep their jobs. Last year they raised the lending rate and this created a ripple effect in the banking system and instead made life difficult for all. Unfortunately some banks who had thought this was a field day ended up loosing customers and borrowers as well. Today bank agents are begging employees to borrow money from banks because people are scared of interest rates that they have refused to lower. Now banks in Uganda are pretending to be doing well and yet simple economics teaches that banks make most of their money by lending to borrowers and it is from those repayments that banks survive.
      For NGOs the majority of which get their funds from donors, salaries are often fixed and because of this staff have had to bear inflation. NGOs therefore should start their own resource mobilization schemes in country to raise funds to top up inflationary periods. Internal rules within NGOs can also be streamlined so as to identify those who are seriously affected by inflation like the lower cadre staff whose wages or salaries are often equal to the amount of money other staff use for transporting themselves  to office. That category of staff should be supported and if possible an NGO van should be used to collect them from the City Square to the NGO office in the morning and back in the evening. Other motivations like providing staff with foodstuffs during public holidays and duty free loans payable within one year might help some staff to start businesses. Other wise benefits like medical that NGOs are good at providing should cover more of family members of NGO staff and the benefits easily accessible so as to enable an employee to do the job. I know a friend who allowed his wife to continue working a certain NGO and earning only 320,000/=  because of the good medical and welfare benefits in the place.
      Lastly resource mobilizers when writing proposals should always try to negotiate for increased salaries of staff. Other managers can then try to argue for what is called a thirteenth cheque during the Christmas period. Otherwise things like tea and lunch if provided in the place of work can help an employee reduce on some of the unfair costs.
      Otherwise allow me to advise all employees in all organizations to start doing some business for their own survival. the future lies in business because it is the best shock absorber when one looses a job and I know of people who ended up leaving their jobs and are now employing other people.

      Charles

      --- On Tue, 2/5/13, manpower <manpower@...> wrote:


      From: manpower <manpower@...>
      Subject: RE: [?? Probable Spam] [Thecoachingnetwork] When is it OK to give a Pay rise??
      To: Thecoachingnetwork@yahoogroups.com
      Date: Tuesday, February 5, 2013, 10:32 PM

       

      Hello,

       

      Complements of the new year.

       

      A combination would work better – assuming the organization has a vibrant performance appraisal culture.

       

      Regards.

       

      Abubakar M Nsekela

      Country Manager

      Manpower Services (T) Ltd

      Dar es Salaam.

       

      Dear Team.

      When is it right to give a salary rise?

      Talking to a number of professionals in different organizations, I have come to notice that different institutions follow different approaches when it comes to giving pay rise.

      Some do have a standard percentage - say 5% of an employees salary is added at the beginning of every new year.

      Some will look at the inflation levels, calculate the Cost of Living and then make the respective adjustments.

      Others will look at the percentage rise in the profitability of the company and then base on that to make adjustments.

      etc etc.

      What is the culture or practice where you work? and what should organizations adopt - a combination??

      Will wait to read your thoughts.

      Kind regards

      Isaac


      No virus found in this message.
      Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
      Version: 2012.0.2221 / Virus Database: 2639/5588 - Release Date: 02/07/13

      DISCLAIMER: This email and any files transmitted with it are confidential and intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are addressed. Any views or opinions presented in this email are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of SNV. SNV accepts no liability for any damage caused by any virus transmitted by this email.
    • osembo martin
      Many thanks Charles for sharing ... From: Eyomu Charles Subject: RE: [?? Probable Spam] [Thecoachingnetwork] When is it OK to give a Pay
      Message 2 of 28 , Feb 8, 2013
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        Many thanks Charles for sharing

        --- On Fri, 2/8/13, Eyomu Charles <eyomuc@...> wrote:

        From: Eyomu Charles <eyomuc@...>
        Subject: RE: [?? Probable Spam] [Thecoachingnetwork] When is it OK to give a Pay rise??
        To: Thecoachingnetwork@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Friday, February 8, 2013, 1:32 AM

         

         

        Regards.

         

        Abubakar M Nsekela

        Country Manager

        Manpower Services (T) Ltd

        Dar es Salaam.

         

        Dear Team.

        When is it right to give a salary rise?

        Talking to a number of professionals in different organizations, I have come to notice that different institutions follow different approaches when it comes to giving pay rise.

        Some do have a standard percentage - say 5% of an employees salary is added at the beginning of every new year.

        Some will look at the inflation levels, calculate the Cost of Living and then make the respective adjustments.

        Others will look at the percentage rise in the profitability of the company and then base on that to make adjustments.

        etc etc.

        What is the culture or practice where you work? and what should organizations adopt - a combination??

        Will wait to read your thoughts.

        Kind regards

        Isaac

        Dear Isaac,
        The combination below can work well with profit making organizations. It may also also work with some NGOs except that NGOs are donor funded and salaries seem to be fixed with few increments at the end of each year. For profit making companies that sell products like sodas or milk, employees can be allocated those products at retail or factory prices for them to find somebody to buy and share the profits or learn to do business themselves. Representatives of employees with support from national unions must advocate for this and companies must help employees to beat inflation. BAT, Soda and Soap selling companies can lead in this.
        Secondly the managers of the economy and bank of Uganda officials in most cases don't tell us the truth about the cost of living index. This is so because most of bank of Uganda officials want to keep their jobs. Last year they raised the lending rate and this created a ripple effect in the banking system and instead made life difficult for all. Unfortunately some banks who had thought this was a field day ended up loosing customers and borrowers as well. Today bank agents are begging employees to borrow money from banks because people are scared of interest rates that they have refused to lower. Now banks in Uganda are pretending to be doing well and yet simple economics teaches that banks make most of their money by lending to borrowers and it is from those repayments that banks survive.
        For NGOs the majority of which get their funds from donors, salaries are often fixed and because of this staff have had to bear inflation. NGOs therefore should start their own resource mobilization schemes in country to raise funds to top up inflationary periods. Internal rules within NGOs can also be streamlined so as to identify those who are seriously affected by inflation like the lower cadre staff whose wages or salaries are often equal to the amount of money other staff use for transporting themselves  to office. That category of staff should be supported and if possible an NGO van should be used to collect them from the City Square to the NGO office in the morning and back in the evening. Other motivations like providing staff with foodstuffs during public holidays and duty free loans payable within one year might help some staff to start businesses. Other wise benefits like medical that NGOs are good at providing should cover more of family members of NGO staff and the benefits easily accessible so as to enable an employee to do the job. I know a friend who allowed his wife to continue working a certain NGO and earning only 320,000/=  because of the good medical and welfare benefits in the place.
        Lastly resource mobilizers when writing proposals should always try to negotiate for increased salaries of staff. Other managers can then try to argue for what is called a thirteenth cheque during the Christmas period. Otherwise things like tea and lunch if provided in the place of work can help an employee reduce on some of the unfair costs.
        Otherwise allow me to advise all employees in all organizations to start doing some business for their own survival. the future lies in business because it is the best shock absorber when one looses a job and I know of people who ended up leaving their jobs and are now employing other people.

        Charles

        --- On Tue, 2/5/13, manpower <manpower@...> wrote:

        From: manpower <manpower@...>
        Subject: RE: [?? Probable Spam] [Thecoachingnetwork] When is it OK to give a Pay rise??
        To: Thecoachingnetwork@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Tuesday, February 5, 2013, 10:32 PM

         

        Hello,

         

        Complements of the new year.

         

        A combination would work better – assuming the organization has a vibrant performance appraisal culture.

      • Eyomu Charles
        Dear Vivian, Thank you for your response and inquiry. I was really referring to business as a solution for lower cadre employees who earn low wages. I carried
        Message 3 of 28 , Feb 9, 2013
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          Dear Vivian,
          Thank you for your response and inquiry. I was really referring to business as a solution for lower cadre employees who earn low wages. I carried out research to establish how lower cadre employees survive and found out that most of them had to do something alongside their work for survival. It is difficult to imagine and office messenger earning 150,000/- surviving in Uganda today and probably with a family especially in Kampala city. Most of those  security guards carrying rifles and keeping premises of all sorts earn something like that or less. Some of them told me that they give their wives some of that money to invest in foodstuffs from markets like Kalerwe and selling the food for a profit. In most police barracks in Uganda you will find that most of the police women are involved in some sort of business for making ends meet like selling brewing or selling some stuff. It is really for survival and for catering for eventualities and managing huge expenses like education.  When people do this, they don't tell others how they are surviving and in most cases Ugandans are the kind of people who will keep smiles in their faces even when the situation is so bad for them. You ask any one how he is and he will always start with a smile and pretends that all is well when there is no food at home for his family that evening. There is a police officer who is a good friend of mine. He told me that although they are not allowed to work for side income, they take the risks for the education of their children. His house is a brewery over the weekends. 

          I think it is difficult to make anyone realize his passion when he can't feed himself or cater for his family. Encouraging employees to invest their little salaries is our social responsibility.  People will work hard at the office when they know that their families will have something to eat in the evenings. Lastly employment in itself is increasing becoming  unpredictable now days and the fear of loosing jobs has made  people a little wise even for those earning good salaries. And also people's own efforts have saved them from being involved in corrupt activities otherwise how would they survive?



          Charles

          --- On Fri, 2/8/13, Mollel, Vivian <vmollel@...> wrote:

          From: Mollel, Vivian <vmollel@...>
          Subject: RE: [?? Probable Spam] [Thecoachingnetwork] When is it OK to give a Pay rise??
          To: "Thecoachingnetwork@yahoogroups.com" <Thecoachingnetwork@yahoogroups.com>
          Date: Friday, February 8, 2013, 3:03 AM

           

          Dear All,

           

          Here at SNV we do have the COLA and a step increase in the salary scale for good performers.

           

          I like the pragmatic solutions suggested by Charles , my only question to Charles is how do you help an employee discover what their passion is and encourage them to have their own business. I envision a lot of questions coming my way as I lack the business advisory skills.

           

          Kind regards

           

          Vivi

           

           

          From: Thecoachingnetwork@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Thecoachingnetwork@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Eyomu Charles
          Sent: 08 February 2013 12:33
          To: Thecoachingnetwork@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: RE: [?? Probable Spam] [Thecoachingnetwork] When is it OK to give a Pay rise??

           

           

          Dear Isaac,
          The combination below can work well with profit making organizations. It may also also work with some NGOs except that NGOs are donor funded and salaries seem to be fixed with few increments at the end of each year. For profit making companies that sell products like sodas or milk, employees can be allocated those products at retail or factory prices for them to find somebody to buy and share the profits or learn to do business themselves. Representatives of employees with support from national unions must advocate for this and companies must help employees to beat inflation. BAT, Soda and Soap selling companies can lead in this.
          Secondly the managers of the economy and bank of Uganda officials in most cases don't tell us the truth about the cost of living index. This is so because most of bank of Uganda officials want to keep their jobs. Last year they raised the lending rate and this created a ripple effect in the banking system and instead made life difficult for all. Unfortunately some banks who had thought this was a field day ended up loosing customers and borrowers as well. Today bank agents are begging employees to borrow money from banks because people are scared of interest rates that they have refused to lower. Now banks in Uganda are pretending to be doing well and yet simple economics teaches that banks make most of their money by lending to borrowers and it is from those repayments that banks survive.
          For NGOs the majority of which get their funds from donors, salaries are often fixed and because of this staff have had to bear inflation. NGOs therefore should start their own resource mobilization schemes in country to raise funds to top up inflationary periods. Internal rules within NGOs can also be streamlined so as to identify those who are seriously affected by inflation like the lower cadre staff whose wages or salaries are often equal to the amount of money other staff use for transporting themselves  to office. That category of staff should be supported and if possible an NGO van should be used to collect them from the City Square to the NGO office in the morning and back in the evening. Other motivations like providing staff with foodstuffs during public holidays and duty free loans payable within one year might help some staff to start businesses. Other wise benefits like medical that NGOs are good at providing should cover more of family members of NGO staff and the benefits easily accessible so as to enable an employee to do the job. I know a friend who allowed his wife to continue working a certain NGO and earning only 320,000/=  because of the good medical and welfare benefits in the place.
          Lastly resource mobilizers when writing proposals should always try to negotiate for increased salaries of staff. Other managers can then try to argue for what is called a thirteenth cheque during the Christmas period. Otherwise things like tea and lunch if provided in the place of work can help an employee reduce on some of the unfair costs.
          Otherwise allow me to advise all employees in all organizations to start doing some business for their own survival. the future lies in business because it is the best shock absorber when one looses a job and I know of people who ended up leaving their jobs and are now employing other people.

          Charles

          --- On Tue, 2/5/13, manpower <manpower@...> wrote:


          From: manpower <manpower@...>
          Subject: RE: [?? Probable Spam] [Thecoachingnetwork] When is it OK to give a Pay rise??
          To: Thecoachingnetwork@yahoogroups.com
          Date: Tuesday, February 5, 2013, 10:32 PM

           

          Hello,

           

          Complements of the new year.

           

          A combination would work better – assuming the organization has a vibrant performance appraisal culture.

           

          Regards.

           

          Abubakar M Nsekela

          Country Manager

          Manpower Services (T) Ltd

          Dar es Salaam.

           

          Dear Team.

          When is it right to give a salary rise?

          Talking to a number of professionals in different organizations, I have come to notice that different institutions follow different approaches when it comes to giving pay rise.

          Some do have a standard percentage - say 5% of an employees salary is added at the beginning of every new year.

          Some will look at the inflation levels, calculate the Cost of Living and then make the respective adjustments.

          Others will look at the percentage rise in the profitability of the company and then base on that to make adjustments.

          etc etc.

          What is the culture or practice where you work? and what should organizations adopt - a combination??

          Will wait to read your thoughts.

          Kind regards

          Isaac


          No virus found in this message.
          Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
          Version: 2012.0.2221 / Virus Database: 2639/5588 - Release Date: 02/07/13

          DISCLAIMER: This email and any files transmitted with it are confidential and intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are addressed. Any views or opinions presented in this email are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of SNV. SNV accepts no liability for any damage caused by any virus transmitted by this email.
        • Eyomu Charles
          Dear Frank, Many thanks and greetings from DOHA city. NGOs in Uganda have failed to cleverly turn AID into investment but have remained doing things in a way
          Message 4 of 28 , Feb 9, 2013
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            Dear Frank,
            Many thanks and greetings from DOHA city. NGOs in Uganda have failed to cleverly turn AID into investment but have remained doing things in a way donors want them done at the risk of failing to secure sustainability for their organizations. How about starting income raising projects for the NGOs like starting technical service units that use the brains of your staff to earn incomes for the NGO through consultancy involvement during free times. Donors should be encouraged to fund projects like construction of development centers so that NGOs can lend out space managing their operations. There is an NGO here funded by CARE Kuwait that constructed a complex for the organization. I will send you their photographs later. They are now renting office space and flats to generate their own money for running half their work. There are NGOs in Kampala that have a lot of space wasted and not occupied. Today in the era of the Global Financial Crisis, NGOs need to start generating funds. If you have extra space or even some extra vehicles, why not rent them. If you are in the area of HIV/AIDS, why not ask MTN or other organizations to allow you to train their staff on how they can protect themselves from HIV or how they can mainstream HIV into their work. Because they are concerned and afraid of loosing staff to HIV/AIDS, they will pay you for your services and that money you can put in the staff welfare fund. Also NGOs need to widen their fundraising base by taking fundraising to corporate companies. I raised 500,000,000/= from MTN alone in 1998 for an NGO in Uganda. That money is money that can be used for motivating staff as well as doing the work. Corporates are not as rigid as other donors.

            Lastly even professionals like doctors that you mentioned below have their own clinics and I am sure all of us have been treated by one of them. The good medical doctors and engineers you see in Uganda to day are in both government and private practice. Most of them fly out monthly for consultancy services. Private practice is a business. If you visit  AAR in the evening, you will meet all the best consultants doing work and in the morning report to Mulago for normal work. If this was not the case, (And if not privately accepted) Uganda would have lost all the medical consultants to our neighbors.I know a University lecturer who is teaching in 3 Universities and now constructing a huge Supermarket in Kawempe. How he does this Allah knows. If eagles have learnt to fly high to beat the rain, who are we not to learn to beat inflation.

            Charles


            --- On Fri, 2/8/13, Frank Kabwechere <Kabwechere@...> wrote:

            From: Frank Kabwechere <Kabwechere@...>
            Subject: RE: [?? Probable Spam] [Thecoachingnetwork] When is it OK to give a Pay rise??
            To: "Coaching Network" <thecoachingnetwork@yahoogroups.com>
            Date: Friday, February 8, 2013, 5:33 AM

             

            Charles,
            You are indeed a good herted person.I agree with all that is written but can we practice it given the circumstances we operate within?
            Comments:
            1. Banks should indeed make money by lending and charging reasonable interest.Now they are making money by deducting our savings in terms of endless fees from ledger to Ido not know what!!!If you have a savings account with Sh 500,000 /= and you do not draw for one year,you might find the money less through the deductions I have mentioned.Then what is a savings account in Uganda? Why don't Banks lend at low interest rates and lend many clients and benefit through multiplier effect?
            2. About NGOs finding money from within to top up salaries got from donors.Some donor policies may not allow that.That is because some extra earnings from the separate business may not be viewed as NGO work but profit making business.How do we go arround that?
            3. If staff are allowed to do personal business,they will have double alligency.There is a tendency of thinking that their personal business will take most of their brains and time and the formal employment organisation will suffer.I remember when we were kids,my mother had to leave formal employment to open a shop because my Dad's job was more paying than hers.People in formal employment were not allowed to do business.Now in our present Uganda,we are every thing,Doctors,Engineers,Constructors,Traders,Farmers,Brokers e.t.c despite the lack of basic expertise and determination in the businesses we engage in and yet we are formally employed at the same time.Maybe that is why we are messing up everything.
              Francis.K. Kabwechere
              Strategy/Organizational Development and Human Resources Management Specialist
              +255 756 880387
              +256754589560

               

            To: Thecoachingnetwork@yahoogroups.com
            From: eyomuc@...
            Date: Fri, 8 Feb 2013 01:32:38 -0800
            Subject: RE: [?? Probable Spam] [Thecoachingnetwork] When is it OK to give a Pay rise??

             
            Dear Isaac,
            The combination below can work well with profit making organizations. It may also also work with some NGOs except that NGOs are donor funded and salaries seem to be fixed with few increments at the end of each year. For profit making companies that sell products like sodas or milk, employees can be allocated those products at retail or factory prices for them to find somebody to buy and share the profits or learn to do business themselves. Representatives of employees with support from national unions must advocate for this and companies must help employees to beat inflation. BAT, Soda and Soap selling companies can lead in this.
            Secondly the managers of the economy and bank of Uganda officials in most cases don't tell us the truth about the cost of living index. This is so because most of bank of Uganda officials want to keep their jobs. Last year they raised the lending rate and this created a ripple effect in the banking system and instead made life difficult for all. Unfortunately some banks who had thought this was a field day ended up loosing customers and borrowers as well. Today bank agents are begging employees to borrow money from banks because people are scared of interest rates that they have refused to lower. Now banks in Uganda are pretending to be doing well and yet simple economics teaches that banks make most of their money by lending to borrowers and it is from those repayments that banks survive.
            For NGOs the majority of which get their funds from donors, salaries are often fixed and because of this staff have had to bear inflation. NGOs therefore should start their own resource mobilization schemes in country to raise funds to top up inflationary periods. Internal rules within NGOs can also be streamlined so as to identify those who are seriously affected by inflation like the lower cadre staff whose wages or salaries are often equal to the amount of money other staff use for transporting themselves  to office. That category of staff should be supported and if possible an NGO van should be used to collect them from the City Square to the NGO office in the morning and back in the evening. Other motivations like providing staff with foodstuffs during public holidays and duty free loans payable within one year might help some staff to start businesses. Other wise benefits like medical that NGOs are good at providing should cover more of family members of NGO staff and the benefits easily accessible so as to enable an employee to do the job. I know a friend who allowed his wife to continue working a certain NGO and earning only 320,000/=  because of the good medical and welfare benefits in the place.
            Lastly resource mobilizers when writing proposals should always try to negotiate for increased salaries of staff. Other managers can then try to argue for what is called a thirteenth cheque during the Christmas period. Otherwise things like tea and lunch if provided in the place of work can help an employee reduce on some of the unfair costs.
            Otherwise allow me to advise all employees in all organizations to start doing some business for their own survival. the future lies in business because it is the best shock absorber when one looses a job and I know of people who ended up leaving their jobs and are now employing other people.

            Charles

            --- On Tue, 2/5/13, manpower <manpower@...> wrote:

            From: manpower <manpower@...>
            Subject: RE: [?? Probable Spam] [Thecoachingnetwork] When is it OK to give a Pay rise??
            To: Thecoachingnetwork@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Tuesday, February 5, 2013, 10:32 PM

             


            Hello,

             

            Complements of the new year.

             

            A combination would work better – assuming the organization has a vibrant performance appraisal culture.

             

            Regards.

             

            Abubakar M Nsekela

            Country Manager

            Manpower Services (T) Ltd

            Dar es Salaam.

             

            Dear Team.

            When is it right to give a salary rise?

            Talking to a number of professionals in different organizations, I have come to notice that different institutions follow different approaches when it comes to giving pay rise.

            Some do have a standard percentage - say 5% of an employees salary is added at the beginning of every new year.

            Some will look at the inflation levels, calculate the Cost of Living and then make the respective adjustments.

            Others will look at the percentage rise in the profitability of the company and then base on that to make adjustments.

            etc etc.

            What is the culture or practice where you work? and what should organizations adopt - a combination??

            Will wait to read your thoughts.

            Kind regards

            Isaac


          • Arinaitwe Moses
            Charles, I love your discussions. The points you raise and examples are down to earth and so real. In a country bitten by corruption and inflation those that
            Message 5 of 28 , Feb 10, 2013
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              Charles, I love your discussions. The points you raise and examples are down to earth and so real. In a country bitten by corruption and inflation those that hold wealth especially owners of  NGOs need to be forward looking. Your proposal to invest some of the funds in capital infrastructure is a powerful one and an eye opener. The very NGOs you talk about therefore need to develop Buisness and investment plans. They must prepared to operate in a Buisness like manner and run away from the current observed  trends of driving huge cars and renting expensive offices Rethinking some of their activities/functions  for divesture and privatization to experienced service providers so that they concentrate in areas where they have comparative advantage in delivering service to the community that they serve?

              Arinaitwe


              Sent from my iPad

              On Feb 9, 2013, at 2:20 PM, Eyomu Charles <eyomuc@...> wrote:

               

              Dear Frank,
              Many thanks and greetings from DOHA city. NGOs in Uganda have failed to cleverly turn AID into investment but have remained doing things in a way donors want them done at the risk of failing to secure sustainability for their organizations. How about starting income raising projects for the NGOs like starting technical service units that use the brains of your staff to earn incomes for the NGO through consultancy involvement during free times. Donors should be encouraged to fund projects like construction of development centers so that NGOs can lend out space managing their operations. There is an NGO here funded by CARE Kuwait that constructed a complex for the organization. I will send you their photographs later. They are now renting office space and flats to generate their own money for running half their work. There are NGOs in Kampala that have a lot of space wasted and not occupied. Today in the era of the Global Financial Crisis, NGOs need to start generating funds. If you have extra space or even some extra vehicles, why not rent them. If you are in the area of HIV/AIDS, why not ask MTN or other organizations to allow you to train their staff on how they can protect themselves from HIV or how they can mainstream HIV into their work. Because they are concerned and afraid of loosing staff to HIV/AIDS, they will pay you for your services and that money you can put in the staff welfare fund. Also NGOs need to widen their fundraising base by taking fundraising to corporate companies. I raised 500,000,000/= from MTN alone in 1998 for an NGO in Uganda. That money is money that can be used for motivating staff as well as doing the work. Corporates are not as rigid as other donors.

              Lastly even professionals like doctors that you mentioned below have their own clinics and I am sure all of us have been treated by one of them. The good medical doctors and engineers you see in Uganda to day are in both government and private practice. Most of them fly out monthly for consultancy services. Private practice is a business. If you visit  AAR in the evening, you will meet all the best consultants doing work and in the morning report to Mulago for normal work. If this was not the case, (And if not privately accepted) Uganda would have lost all the medical consultants to our neighbors.I know a University lecturer who is teaching in 3 Universities and now constructing a huge Supermarket in Kawempe. How he does this Allah knows. If eagles have learnt to fly high to beat the rain, who are we not to learn to beat inflation.

              Charles


              --- On Fri, 2/8/13, Frank Kabwechere <Kabwechere@...> wrote:

              From: Frank Kabwechere <Kabwechere@...>
              Subject: RE: [?? Probable Spam] [Thecoachingnetwork] When is it OK to give a Pay rise??
              To: "Coaching Network" <thecoachingnetwork@yahoogroups.com>
              Date: Friday, February 8, 2013, 5:33 AM

               

              Charles,
              You are indeed a good herted person.I agree with all that is written but can we practice it given the circumstances we operate within?
              Comments:
              1. Banks should indeed make money by lending and charging reasonable interest.Now they are making money by deducting our savings in terms of endless fees from ledger to Ido not know what!!!If you have a savings account with Sh 500,000 /= and you do not draw for one year,you might find the money less through the deductions I have mentioned.Then what is a savings account in Uganda? Why don't Banks lend at low interest rates and lend many clients and benefit through multiplier effect?
              2. About NGOs finding money from within to top up salaries got from donors.Some donor policies may not allow that.That is because some extra earnings from the separate business may not be viewed as NGO work but profit making business.How do we go arround that?
              3. If staff are allowed to do personal business,they will have double alligency.There is a tendency of thinking that their personal business will take most of their brains and time and the formal employment organisation will suffer.I remember when we were kids,my mother had to leave formal employment to open a shop because my Dad's job was more paying than hers.People in formal employment were not allowed to do business.Now in our present Uganda,we are every thing,Doctors,Engineers,Constructors,Traders,Farmers,Brokers e.t.c despite the lack of basic expertise and determination in the businesses we engage in and yet we are formally employed at the same time.Maybe that is why we are messing up everything.
                Francis.K. Kabwechere
                Strategy/Organizational Development and Human Resources Management Specialist
                +255 756 880387
                +256754589560

                 

              To: Thecoachingnetwork@yahoogroups.com
              From: eyomuc@...
              Date: Fri, 8 Feb 2013 01:32:38 -0800
              Subject: RE: [?? Probable Spam] [Thecoachingnetwork] When is it OK to give a Pay rise??

               
              Dear Isaac,
              The combination below can work well with profit making organizations. It may also also work with some NGOs except that NGOs are donor funded and salaries seem to be fixed with few increments at the end of each year. For profit making companies that sell products like sodas or milk, employees can be allocated those products at retail or factory prices for them to find somebody to buy and share the profits or learn to do business themselves. Representatives of employees with support from national unions must advocate for this and companies must help employees to beat inflation. BAT, Soda and Soap selling companies can lead in this.
              Secondly the managers of the economy and bank of Uganda officials in most cases don't tell us the truth about the cost of living index. This is so because most of bank of Uganda officials want to keep their jobs. Last year they raised the lending rate and this created a ripple effect in the banking system and instead made life difficult for all. Unfortunately some banks who had thought this was a field day ended up loosing customers and borrowers as well. Today bank agents are begging employees to borrow money from banks because people are scared of interest rates that they have refused to lower. Now banks in Uganda are pretending to be doing well and yet simple economics teaches that banks make most of their money by lending to borrowers and it is from those repayments that banks survive.
              For NGOs the majority of which get their funds from donors, salaries are often fixed and because of this staff have had to bear inflation. NGOs therefore should start their own resource mobilization schemes in country to raise funds to top up inflationary periods. Internal rules within NGOs can also be streamlined so as to identify those who are seriously affected by inflation like the lower cadre staff whose wages or salaries are often equal to the amount of money other staff use for transporting themselves  to office. That category of staff should be supported and if possible an NGO van should be used to collect them from the City Square to the NGO office in the morning and back in the evening. Other motivations like providing staff with foodstuffs during public holidays and duty free loans payable within one year might help some staff to start businesses. Other wise benefits like medical that NGOs are good at providing should cover more of family members of NGO staff and the benefits easily accessible so as to enable an employee to do the job. I know a friend who allowed his wife to continue working a certain NGO and earning only 320,000/=  because of the good medical and welfare benefits in the place.
              Lastly resource mobilizers when writing proposals should always try to negotiate for increased salaries of staff. Other managers can then try to argue for what is called a thirteenth cheque during the Christmas period. Otherwise things like tea and lunch if provided in the place of work can help an employee reduce on some of the unfair costs.
              Otherwise allow me to advise all employees in all organizations to start doing some business for their own survival. the future lies in business because it is the best shock absorber when one looses a job and I know of people who ended up leaving their jobs and are now employing other people.

              Charles

              --- On Tue, 2/5/13, manpower <manpower@...> wrote:

              From: manpower <manpower@...>
              Subject: RE: [?? Probable Spam] [Thecoachingnetwork] When is it OK to give a Pay rise??
              To: Thecoachingnetwork@yahoogroups.com
              Date: Tuesday, February 5, 2013, 10:32 PM

               


              Hello,

               

              Complements of the new year.

               

              A combination would work better – assuming the organization has a vibrant performance appraisal culture.

               

              Regards.

               

              Abubakar M Nsekela

              Country Manager

              Manpower Services (T) Ltd

              Dar es Salaam.

               

              Dear Team.

              When is it right to give a salary rise?

              Talking to a number of professionals in different organizations, I have come to notice that different institutions follow different approaches when it comes to giving pay rise.

              Some do have a standard percentage - say 5% of an employees salary is added at the beginning of every new year.

              Some will look at the inflation levels, calculate the Cost of Living and then make the respective adjustments.

              Others will look at the percentage rise in the profitability of the company and then base on that to make adjustments.

              etc etc.

              What is the culture or practice where you work? and what should organizations adopt - a combination??

              Will wait to read your thoughts.

              Kind regards

              Isaac


              Reply via web post Reply to sender Reply to group
            • Arinaitwe Moses
              Vivian, Iam happy to share some experiences on how things start. If you have a social welfare club where your staff meet, Iam happy to open your eyes. You can
              Message 6 of 28 , Feb 10, 2013
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              • 0 Attachment

                Vivian,

                Iam happy to share some experiences on how things start. If you have a social welfare club where your staff meet, Iam happy to open your eyes. You can reach me at: arinaitwem@... 

                Arinaitwe


                Sent from my iPad

                On Feb 8, 2013, at 2:03 PM, "Mollel, Vivian" <vmollel@...> wrote:

                 

                Dear All,

                 

                Here at SNV we do have the COLA and a step increase in the salary scale for good performers.

                 

                I like the pragmatic solutions suggested by Charles , my only question to Charles is how do you help an employee discover what their passion is and encourage them to have their own business. I envision a lot of questions coming my way as I lack the business advisory skills.

                 

                Kind regards

                 

                Vivi

                 

                 

                From: Thecoachingnetwork@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Thecoachingnetwork@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Eyomu Charles
                Sent: 08 February 2013 12:33
                To: Thecoachingnetwork@yahoogroups.com
                Subject: RE: [?? Probable Spam] [Thecoachingnetwork] When is it OK to give a Pay rise??

                 

                 

                Dear Isaac,
                The combination below can work well with profit making organizations. It may also also work with some NGOs except that NGOs are donor funded and salaries seem to be fixed with few increments at the end of each year. For profit making companies that sell products like sodas or milk, employees can be allocated those products at retail or factory prices for them to find somebody to buy and share the profits or learn to do business themselves. Representatives of employees with support from national unions must advocate for this and companies must help employees to beat inflation. BAT, Soda and Soap selling companies can lead in this.
                Secondly the managers of the economy and bank of Uganda officials in most cases don't tell us the truth about the cost of living index. This is so because most of bank of Uganda officials want to keep their jobs. Last year they raised the lending rate and this created a ripple effect in the banking system and instead made life difficult for all. Unfortunately some banks who had thought this was a field day ended up loosing customers and borrowers as well. Today bank agents are begging employees to borrow money from banks because people are scared of interest rates that they have refused to lower. Now banks in Uganda are pretending to be doing well and yet simple economics teaches that banks make most of their money by lending to borrowers and it is from those repayments that banks survive.
                For NGOs the majority of which get their funds from donors, salaries are often fixed and because of this staff have had to bear inflation. NGOs therefore should start their own resource mobilization schemes in country to raise funds to top up inflationary periods. Internal rules within NGOs can also be streamlined so as to identify those who are seriously affected by inflation like the lower cadre staff whose wages or salaries are often equal to the amount of money other staff use for transporting themselves  to office. That category of staff should be supported and if possible an NGO van should be used to collect them from the City Square to the NGO office in the morning and back in the evening. Other motivations like providing staff with foodstuffs during public holidays and duty free loans payable within one year might help some staff to start businesses. Other wise benefits like medical that NGOs are good at providing should cover more of family members of NGO staff and the benefits easily accessible so as to enable an employee to do the job. I know a friend who allowed his wife to continue working a certain NGO and earning only 320,000/=  because of the good medical and welfare benefits in the place.
                Lastly resource mobilizers when writing proposals should always try to negotiate for increased salaries of staff. Other managers can then try to argue for what is called a thirteenth cheque during the Christmas period. Otherwise things like tea and lunch if provided in the place of work can help an employee reduce on some of the unfair costs.
                Otherwise allow me to advise all employees in all organizations to start doing some business for their own survival. the future lies in business because it is the best shock absorber when one looses a job and I know of people who ended up leaving their jobs and are now employing other people.

                Charles

                --- On Tue, 2/5/13, manpower <manpower@...> wrote:


                From: manpower <manpower@...>
                Subject: RE: [?? Probable Spam] [Thecoachingnetwork] When is it OK to give a Pay rise??
                To: Thecoachingnetwork@yahoogroups.com
                Date: Tuesday, February 5, 2013, 10:32 PM

                 

                Hello,

                 

                Complements of the new year.

                 

                A combination would work better – assuming the organization has a vibrant performance appraisal culture.

                 

                Regards.

                 

                Abubakar M Nsekela

                Country Manager

                Manpower Services (T) Ltd

                Dar es Salaam.

                 

                Dear Team.

                When is it right to give a salary rise?

                Talking to a number of professionals in different organizations, I have come to notice that different institutions follow different approaches when it comes to giving pay rise.

                Some do have a standard percentage - say 5% of an employees salary is added at the beginning of every new year.

                Some will look at the inflation levels, calculate the Cost of Living and then make the respective adjustments.

                Others will look at the percentage rise in the profitability of the company and then base on that to make adjustments.

                etc etc.

                What is the culture or practice where you work? and what should organizations adopt - a combination??

                Will wait to read your thoughts.

                Kind regards

                Isaac


                No virus found in this message.
                Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                Version: 2012.0.2221 / Virus Database: 2639/5588 - Release Date: 02/07/13

                DISCLAIMER: This email and any files transmitted with it are confidential and intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are addressed. Any views or opinions presented in this email are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of SNV. SNV accepts no liability for any damage caused by any virus transmitted by this email.

                Reply via web post Reply to sender Reply to group Start a New Topic </
              • Mollel, Vivian
                Hi Charles I was reading the first few lines I was shaking my head and saying it isn’t just the lower cadre who need to be business oriented, I know of lower
                Message 7 of 28 , Feb 10, 2013
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                • 0 Attachment

                  Hi Charles

                   

                  I was reading the first few lines I was shaking my head and saying it isn’t just the lower cadre who need to be business oriented, I know of lower cadre employees living in their own houses that they have  built, and as we may think they need our help they must be saying the same about higher paid ones still renting a house.

                   

                  Your last paragraph acknowledges my thoughts that the job insecurity is on the rise and even those earning good salaries are affected, and this is why we (if you are still employed) need to realise your passion and pursue it, it is the only way to success, and believe me a person who ventures into a business out of passion is 100 times likely to be successful compared to the one in it for the money. So knowing your passion either rich or poor is key.

                   

                  Kind regards

                   

                  Vivi

                   

                  From: Thecoachingnetwork@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Thecoachingnetwork@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Eyomu Charles
                  Sent: 09 February 2013 12:51
                  To: Thecoachingnetwork@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: RE: [?? Probable Spam] [Thecoachingnetwork] When is it OK to give a Pay rise??

                   

                   

                  Dear Vivian,
                  Thank you for your response and inquiry. I was really referring to business as a solution for lower cadre employees who earn low wages. I carried out research to establish how lower cadre employees survive and found out that most of them had to do something alongside their work for survival. It is difficult to imagine and office messenger earning 150,000/- surviving in Uganda today and probably with a family especially in Kampala city. Most of those  security guards carrying rifles and keeping premises of all sorts earn something like that or less. Some of them told me that they give their wives some of that money to invest in foodstuffs from markets like Kalerwe and selling the food for a profit. In most police barracks in Uganda you will find that most of the police women are involved in some sort of business for making ends meet like selling brewing or selling some stuff. It is really for survival and for catering for eventualities and managing huge expenses like education.  When people do this, they don't tell others how they are surviving and in most cases Ugandans are the kind of people who will keep smiles in their faces even when the situation is so bad for them. You ask any one how he is and he will always start with a smile and pretends that all is well when there is no food at home for his family that evening. There is a police officer who is a good friend of mine. He told me that although they are not allowed to work for side income, they take the risks for the education of their children. His house is a brewery over the weekends. 

                  I think it is difficult to make anyone realize his passion when he can't feed himself or cater for his family. Encouraging employees to invest their little salaries is our social responsibility.  People will work hard at the office when they know that their families will have something to eat in the evenings. Lastly employment in itself is increasing becoming  unpredictable now days and the fear of loosing jobs has made  people a little wise even for those earning good salaries. And also people's own efforts have saved them from being involved in corrupt activities otherwise how would they survive?



                  Charles

                  --- On Fri, 2/8/13, Mollel, Vivian <vmollel@...> wrote:


                  From: Mollel, Vivian <vmollel@...>
                  Subject: RE: [?? Probable Spam] [Thecoachingnetwork] When is it OK to give a Pay rise??
                  To: "Thecoachingnetwork@yahoogroups.com" <Thecoachingnetwork@yahoogroups.com>
                  Date: Friday, February 8, 2013, 3:03 AM

                   

                  Dear All,

                   

                  Here at SNV we do have the COLA and a step increase in the salary scale for good performers.

                   

                  I like the pragmatic solutions suggested by Charles , my only question to Charles is how do you help an employee discover what their passion is and encourage them to have their own business. I envision a lot of questions coming my way as I lack the business advisory skills.

                   

                  Kind regards

                   

                  Vivi

                   

                   

                  From: Thecoachingnetwork@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Thecoachingnetwork@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Eyomu Charles
                  Sent: 08 February 2013 12:33
                  To: Thecoachingnetwork@yahoogroups.com
                  Subject: RE: [?? Probable Spam] [Thecoachingnetwork] When is it OK to give a Pay rise??

                   

                   

                  Dear Isaac,
                  The combination below can work well with profit making organizations. It may also also work with some NGOs except that NGOs are donor funded and salaries seem to be fixed with few increments at the end of each year. For profit making companies that sell products like sodas or milk, employees can be allocated those products at retail or factory prices for them to find somebody to buy and share the profits or learn to do business themselves. Representatives of employees with support from national unions must advocate for this and companies must help employees to beat inflation. BAT, Soda and Soap selling companies can lead in this.
                  Secondly the managers of the economy and bank of Uganda officials in most cases don't tell us the truth about the cost of living index. This is so because most of bank of Uganda officials want to keep their jobs. Last year they raised the lending rate and this created a ripple effect in the banking system and instead made life difficult for all. Unfortunately some banks who had thought this was a field day ended up loosing customers and borrowers as well. Today bank agents are begging employees to borrow money from banks because people are scared of interest rates that they have refused to lower. Now banks in Uganda are pretending to be doing well and yet simple economics teaches that banks make most of their money by lending to borrowers and it is from those repayments that banks survive.
                  For NGOs the majority of which get their funds from donors, salaries are often fixed and because of this staff have had to bear inflation. NGOs therefore should start their own resource mobilization schemes in country to raise funds to top up inflationary periods. Internal rules within NGOs can also be streamlined so as to identify those who are seriously affected by inflation like the lower cadre staff whose wages or salaries are often equal to the amount of money other staff use for transporting themselves  to office. That category of staff should be supported and if possible an NGO van should be used to collect them from the City Square to the NGO office in the morning and back in the evening. Other motivations like providing staff with foodstuffs during public holidays and duty free loans payable within one year might help some staff to start businesses. Other wise benefits like medical that NGOs are good at providing should cover more of family members of NGO staff and the benefits easily accessible so as to enable an employee to do the job. I know a friend who allowed his wife to continue working a certain NGO and earning only 320,000/=  because of the good medical and welfare benefits in the place.
                  Lastly resource mobilizers when writing proposals should always try to negotiate for increased salaries of staff. Other managers can then try to argue for what is called a thirteenth cheque during the Christmas period. Otherwise things like tea and lunch if provided in the place of work can help an employee reduce on some of the unfair costs.
                  Otherwise allow me to advise all employees in all organizations to start doing some business for their own survival. the future lies in business because it is the best shock absorber when one looses a job and I know of people who ended up leaving their jobs and are now employing other people.

                  Charles

                  --- On Tue, 2/5/13, manpower <manpower@...> wrote:


                  From: manpower <manpower@...>
                  Subject: RE: [?? Probable Spam] [Thecoachingnetwork] When is it OK to give a Pay rise??
                  To: Thecoachingnetwork@yahoogroups.com
                  Date: Tuesday, February 5, 2013, 10:32 PM

                   

                  Hello,

                   

                  Complements of the new year.

                   

                  A combination would work better – assuming the organization has a vibrant performance appraisal culture.

                   

                  Regards.

                   

                  Abubakar M Nsekela

                  Country Manager

                  Manpower Services (T) Ltd

                  Dar es Salaam.

                   

                  Dear Team.

                  When is it right to give a salary rise?

                  Talking to a number of professionals in different organizations, I have come to notice that different institutions follow different approaches when it comes to giving pay rise.

                  Some do have a standard percentage - say 5% of an employees salary is added at the beginning of every new year.

                  Some will look at the inflation levels, calculate the Cost of Living and then make the respective adjustments.

                  Others will look at the percentage rise in the profitability of the company and then base on that to make adjustments.

                  etc etc.

                  What is the culture or practice where you work? and what should organizations adopt - a combination??

                  Will wait to read your thoughts.

                  Kind regards

                  Isaac


                  No virus found in this message.
                  Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                  Version: 2012.0.2221 / Virus Database: 2639/5588 - Release Date: 02/07/13

                  DISCLAIMER: This email and any files transmitted with it are confidential and intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are addressed. Any views or opinions presented in this email are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of SNV. SNV accepts no liability for any damage caused by any virus transmitted by this email.


                  No virus found in this message.
                  Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                  Version: 2012.0.2221 / Virus Database: 2639/5588 - Release Date: 02/07/13

                  DISCLAIMER: This email and any files transmitted with it are confidential and intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are addressed. Any views or opinions presented in this email are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of SNV. SNV accepts no liability for any damage caused by any virus transmitted by this email.
                • Eyomu Charles
                  Excellent Vivian, I am glad we are both looking at the big picture and thinking strategically. The ball is now in the court of those in charge of organizations
                  Message 8 of 28 , Feb 10, 2013
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                  • 0 Attachment
                    Excellent Vivian,
                    I am glad we are both looking at the big picture and thinking strategically. The ball is now in the court of those in charge of organizations to review their policies. I am off to Aden City.
                     
                    Charles

                    --- On Sun, 2/10/13, Mollel, Vivian <vmollel@...> wrote:

                    From: Mollel, Vivian <vmollel@...>
                    Subject: RE: [?? Probable Spam] [Thecoachingnetwork] When is it OK to give a Pay rise??
                    To: "Thecoachingnetwork@yahoogroups.com" <Thecoachingnetwork@yahoogroups.com>
                    Date: Sunday, February 10, 2013, 10:30 AM

                     

                    Hi Charles

                     

                    I was reading the first few lines I was shaking my head and saying it isn’t just the lower cadre who need to be business oriented, I know of lower cadre employees living in their own houses that they have  built, and as we may think they need our help they must be saying the same about higher paid ones still renting a house.

                     

                    Your last paragraph acknowledges my thoughts that the job insecurity is on the rise and even those earning good salaries are affected, and this is why we (if you are still employed) need to realise your passion and pursue it, it is the only way to success, and believe me a person who ventures into a business out of passion is 100 times likely to be successful compared to the one in it for the money. So knowing your passion either rich or poor is key.

                     

                    Kind regards

                     

                    Vivi

                     

                    From: Thecoachingnetwork@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Thecoachingnetwork@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Eyomu Charles
                    Sent: 09 February 2013 12:51
                    To: Thecoachingnetwork@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: RE: [?? Probable Spam] [Thecoachingnetwork] When is it OK to give a Pay rise??

                     

                     

                    Dear Vivian,
                    Thank you for your response and inquiry. I was really referring to business as a solution for lower cadre employees who earn low wages. I carried out research to establish how lower cadre employees survive and found out that most of them had to do something alongside their work for survival. It is difficult to imagine and office messenger earning 150,000/- surviving in Uganda today and probably with a family especially in Kampala city. Most of those  security guards carrying rifles and keeping premises of all sorts earn something like that or less. Some of them told me that they give their wives some of that money to invest in foodstuffs from markets like Kalerwe and selling the food for a profit. In most police barracks in Uganda you will find that most of the police women are involved in some sort of business for making ends meet like selling brewing or selling some stuff. It is really for survival and for catering for eventualities and managing huge expenses like education.  When people do this, they don't tell others how they are surviving and in most cases Ugandans are the kind of people who will keep smiles in their faces even when the situation is so bad for them. You ask any one how he is and he will always start with a smile and pretends that all is well when there is no food at home for his family that evening. There is a police officer who is a good friend of mine. He told me that although they are not allowed to work for side income, they take the risks for the education of their children. His house is a brewery over the weekends. 

                    I think it is difficult to make anyone realize his passion when he can't feed himself or cater for his family. Encouraging employees to invest their little salaries is our social responsibility.  People will work hard at the office when they know that their families will have something to eat in the evenings. Lastly employment in itself is increasing becoming  unpredictable now days and the fear of loosing jobs has made  people a little wise even for those earning good salaries. And also people's own efforts have saved them from being involved in corrupt activities otherwise how would they survive?



                    Charles

                    --- On Fri, 2/8/13, Mollel, Vivian <vmollel@...> wrote:


                    From: Mollel, Vivian <vmollel@...>
                    Subject: RE: [?? Probable Spam] [Thecoachingnetwork] When is it OK to give a Pay rise??
                    To: "Thecoachingnetwork@yahoogroups.com" <Thecoachingnetwork@yahoogroups.com>
                    Date: Friday, February 8, 2013, 3:03 AM

                     

                    Dear All,

                     

                    Here at SNV we do have the COLA and a step increase in the salary scale for good performers.

                     

                    I like the pragmatic solutions suggested by Charles , my only question to Charles is how do you help an employee discover what their passion is and encourage them to have their own business. I envision a lot of questions coming my way as I lack the business advisory skills.

                     

                    Kind regards

                     

                    Vivi

                     

                     

                    From: Thecoachingnetwork@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Thecoachingnetwork@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Eyomu Charles
                    Sent: 08 February 2013 12:33
                    To: Thecoachingnetwork@yahoogroups.com
                    Subject: RE: [?? Probable Spam] [Thecoachingnetwork] When is it OK to give a Pay rise??

                     

                     

                    Dear Isaac,
                    The combination below can work well with profit making organizations. It may also also work with some NGOs except that NGOs are donor funded and salaries seem to be fixed with few increments at the end of each year. For profit making companies that sell products like sodas or milk, employees can be allocated those products at retail or factory prices for them to find somebody to buy and share the profits or learn to do business themselves. Representatives of employees with support from national unions must advocate for this and companies must help employees to beat inflation. BAT, Soda and Soap selling companies can lead in this.
                    Secondly the managers of the economy and bank of Uganda officials in most cases don't tell us the truth about the cost of living index. This is so because most of bank of Uganda officials want to keep their jobs. Last year they raised the lending rate and this created a ripple effect in the banking system and instead made life difficult for all. Unfortunately some banks who had thought this was a field day ended up loosing customers and borrowers as well. Today bank agents are begging employees to borrow money from banks because people are scared of interest rates that they have refused to lower. Now banks in Uganda are pretending to be doing well and yet simple economics teaches that banks make most of their money by lending to borrowers and it is from those repayments that banks survive.
                    For NGOs the majority of which get their funds from donors, salaries are often fixed and because of this staff have had to bear inflation. NGOs therefore should start their own resource mobilization schemes in country to raise funds to top up inflationary periods. Internal rules within NGOs can also be streamlined so as to identify those who are seriously affected by inflation like the lower cadre staff whose wages or salaries are often equal to the amount of money other staff use for transporting themselves  to office. That category of staff should be supported and if possible an NGO van should be used to collect them from the City Square to the NGO office in the morning and back in the evening. Other motivations like providing staff with foodstuffs during public holidays and duty free loans payable within one year might help some staff to start businesses. Other wise benefits like medical that NGOs are good at providing should cover more of family members of NGO staff and the benefits easily accessible so as to enable an employee to do the job. I know a friend who allowed his wife to continue working a certain NGO and earning only 320,000/=  because of the good medical and welfare benefits in the place.
                    Lastly resource mobilizers when writing proposals should always try to negotiate for increased salaries of staff. Other managers can then try to argue for what is called a thirteenth cheque during the Christmas period. Otherwise things like tea and lunch if provided in the place of work can help an employee reduce on some of the unfair costs.
                    Otherwise allow me to advise all employees in all organizations to start doing some business for their own survival. the future lies in business because it is the best shock absorber when one looses a job and I know of people who ended up leaving their jobs and are now employing other people.

                    Charles

                    --- On Tue, 2/5/13, manpower <manpower@...> wrote:


                    From: manpower <manpower@...>
                    Subject: RE: [?? Probable Spam] [Thecoachingnetwork] When is it OK to give a Pay rise??
                    To: Thecoachingnetwork@yahoogroups.com
                    Date: Tuesday, February 5, 2013, 10:32 PM

                     

                    Hello,

                     

                    Complements of the new year.

                     

                    A combination would work better – assuming the organization has a vibrant performance appraisal culture.

                     

                    Regards.

                     

                    Abubakar M Nsekela

                    Country Manager

                    Manpower Services (T) Ltd

                    Dar es Salaam.

                     

                    Dear Team.

                    When is it right to give a salary rise?

                    Talking to a number of professionals in different organizations, I have come to notice that different institutions follow different approaches when it comes to giving pay rise.

                    Some do have a standard percentage - say 5% of an employees salary is added at the beginning of every new year.

                    Some will look at the inflation levels, calculate the Cost of Living and then make the respective adjustments.

                    Others will look at the percentage rise in the profitability of the company and then base on that to make adjustments.

                    etc etc.

                    What is the culture or practice where you work? and what should organizations adopt - a combination??

                    Will wait to read your thoughts.

                    Kind regards

                    Isaac


                    No virus found in this message.
                    Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                    Version: 2012.0.2221 / Virus Database: 2639/5588 - Release Date: 02/07/13

                    DISCLAIMER: This email and any files transmitted with it are confidential and intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are addressed. Any views or opinions presented in this email are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of SNV. SNV accepts no liability for any damage caused by any virus transmitted by this email.


                    No virus found in this message.
                    Checked by AVG - www.avg.com
                    Version: 2012.0.2221 / Virus Database: 2639/5588 - Release Date: 02/07/13

                    DISCLAIMER: This email and any files transmitted with it are confidential and intended solely for the use of the individual or entity to whom they are addressed. Any views or opinions presented in this email are solely those of the author and do not necessarily represent those of SNV. SNV accepts no liability for any damage caused by any virus transmitted by this email.
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