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Re: Soapbox warning:

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  • eginden2
    Sounded like a history lesson to me. Personally, I love hearing about the history and evolution of the Ger/Yurt. Won t get my hackles up that way. By the way,
    Message 1 of 7 , Aug 1, 2009
      Sounded like a history lesson to me. Personally, I love hearing about the history and evolution of the Ger/Yurt. Won't get my hackles up that way.
      By the way, I looked at the group link regarding regarding composting toilets. Apparently,it started with a dutchman and talk's about the Nanolet.


      --- In The_Yurt_Community@yahoogroups.com, "froit1" <froit1@...> wrote:
      >
      > Soapbox warning:
      > 1500 years ago there is no mention of 'Mongols' anywhere to be found, earliest evidence of 'Mongol' is Ghengis' grandfather, so around 1050 AD maybe.
      > Warning 2; there is abslolutely NO evidenc of braziers ever being made of anything other than iron/steel here in MNG.
      > I guess, here on the steppes, with only cow-and horse-dung to burn, braziers are/were maybe MORE IMPORTANT than weapons?
      > Warning 3:
      > Peat and bog, that is Ireland, not Wales.
      > Wales had the last-closing-coal-mine-riots in GB, maybe some are still be working.
      > As far as I know Wales is completely covered in forest/Google-Earth says it is not, it is mostly rolling hills, with steep ravines.
      > Anyway, plenty firewood there.
      > So far for this soap-box-session.
      > F, UB
      >
      > --- In The_Yurt_Community@yahoogroups.com, Kenneth <whitephoenix_69@> wrote:
      > >
      > > In wales they would use peit from the bog not wood or coal...LOL
      > >  
      > > And 1500 years ago, mongols would have used copper or brass because "steel" would have been to great a price and they would have used for weapons. 
      > >
      > > --- On Fri, 7/31/09, froit1 <froit1@> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > > From: froit1 <froit1@>
      > > Subject: [The_Yurt_Community] Re: Insulating a yurt for a cold, wet climate
      > > To: The_Yurt_Community@yahoogroups.com
      > > Date: Friday, July 31, 2009, 10:23 AM
      > >
      > >
      > >  
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > From the soap-box:
      > > NOT ALL commercial yurt-companies do strange things like bubble-wrap, some stick to the real stuff, felt, with succes.
      > > Felt works just fine in any climate, provided it is covered with an absolutely waterproof, yet breathing layer, such as canvas or GoreTex.
      > > We never had mold, in 13 years Holland, which is not much different from Wales, I guess.
      > > Rain on at least 200 days a year, totalling 85 cms.
      > > Average annual relative humidity 90%.
      > >
      > > It is hard to say exactly from here, but the negative experience your friend had must have been due NOT to the felt, but to the waterproofing layer supposed to protect it.
      > > Maybe leaked somewhat, or prevented moisture from inside to escape outward, or maybe not fired up/vented enough, or a combination of those.
      > > We did some experiments with synthetic felts, but found them to mold, when real wool did not...
      > > Electric de-humidifiers are a complete waste of money and (non-renewable- )energy, for sure in Wales, where it never gets too hot.
      > > Anyway, and don't even try to heat your yurt with a brazier/open manure fire, I do not think you will be able to find enough dry horse-manure in Wales.
      > > And for the record, Mongolian Ger-braziers are steel, not copper or bronze, and have been replaced by stoves ever since sheet-metal was available, let's say, 140 years.
      > > Better heat your ger/yurt the modern mongolian way, a proper stove, in the centre, with a stove-pipe through one of the windows.
      > > Fire on wood and coal, should be no problem in Wales.
      > >
      > > GRT Froit
      > >
      > > --- In The_Yurt_Community@ yahoogroups. com, Kenneth <whitephoenix_ 69@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > All commercial yurt companies use Astro-foil or something like it for the insulation.
      > > > �
      > > > We use an acrylic liner to cover it so it don't look like you are inside a jiffy-pop bag.� It does a great job of insulation.� But the better thing is that both layers can be sprayed with either "Mold control"tm that will stop mold growth for up to 6 months at a time or a simple water bleach, water ammounia spray you can do weekly.� IF the mold for what ever reason gets really bad, simply take the cover off, 1 part bleach to 1000 parts water and scrub brush will fix it.� Might have a little stain but won't hurt the cover, insulation or liner.
      > > > �
      > > > A de-humidifier is a must in a wet area.� HOT+WET+AIR = MOLD.� NO way around it.� I have always wondered why a person will think that a yurt will be any different than a house will be without a/c.� A house will get mold real bad with all the windows shut, in a hot dry area, so why not a yurt?�
      > > > �
      > > > The great thing for you is that a 16 foot yurt is easy to heat, and a regular size de-hum...will do wonders.
      > > > �
      > > > MANY don't put 2 and 2 together, real gers, have copper or brass brasens (hope I spelled that right) to heat them.� This is fuel by dry dun most the time.� Heat will dry out the air inside a ger, but many forget at the same time, the top is open to vent, as the air heat and goes up so does the smoke and the moist air with it.
      > > > �
      > > > Like with period tents, many don't know they used oil or fat to water proof them, so they had to have vents in them so the hot air could get out.� Modern day period tents most the time lack the vent, so when one see a vent it it, they go "that not right".� MANY thing have been lost over the ages.�
      > > > �
      > > > NOW before one of our members get on their soap box.� YES none of this the way the MONGAL would have done it.� THIS is modern times, nobody is building a wall to keep us out.� NO matter what one will tell you felt will breed MOLD if wet all the time, even treated felt.� Well unless it's that new arcylic felt which looks and feels like felt but is fake.
      > > > �
      > > > Mold grows and eats anything natural.
      > > > �
      > > > ken
      > > >
      > > > --- On Thu, 7/30/09, Mike Wilson <mikewilsonuk@ ...> wrote:
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > From: Mike Wilson <mikewilsonuk@ ...>
      > > > Subject: [The_Yurt_Community ] Insulating a yurt for a cold, wet climate
      > > > To: The_Yurt_Community@ yahoogroups. com
      > > > Date: Thursday, July 30, 2009, 8:44 AM
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > �
      > > >
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > I will soon be moving into a 16' yurt for my full-time home. It will be somewhere in south Wales, UK. I will be using a wood burning stove for heat.
      > > >
      > > > The weather here is cold and wet. Last winter, which was unusually cold, the night-time temperature went down to -12C (10F). That is unusual, but even in a mild winter frost and snow are pretty well guaranteed.
      > > >
      > > > A couple of years ago, some friends of mine started the winter living in a Mongolian yurt insulated with felt. They had to abandon the yurt and move back into a house when mould started growing on the felt. The moist air seems to condense on the felt encouraging the dreaded black mould.
      > > >
      > > > What is the best form of insulation for a cold, wet climate? I am wondering about using the layered foil/bubble sheet such as Astro Foil. This would be pretty expensive, but would be fairly easy to fit and seems to be a good compromise between thickness and insulation performance. Does anyone have experience using this?
      > > >
      > >
      >
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