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Plans

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  • Mengro, the Road Scholar
    Hi there, Now that Florida temps are hitting below 90 F. during the day on occasion, I guess it s time to start living again. God, these Florida summers are
    Message 1 of 5 , Oct 1, 2005
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      Hi there,

      Now that Florida temps are hitting below 90 F. during the day on
      occasion, I guess it's time to start living again. God, these Florida
      summers are worse than my old Maine winters.

      I think this year before next summer I'll build a traditional Asian yurt
      like they would build in Kazakhstan, Kyrgyz, or Siberia, rather than the
      Mongolian style. The reason I'm choosing one of these is that I believe
      it is more appropriate for a wetter climate. I don't actually know this
      is true but I reason it is. For one, I plan to make the roof higher in
      the center than the Mongolian style that in my opinion can in some cases
      almost resemble a pillbox in how flat the roof is. Can you imagine a
      foot of wet snow sitting on top of a flat-roofed yurt?

      I plan to go down to the drainage ditches along the roadside and cut
      willow with a natural bend to it, peel it, drill it, and prepare it.
      When I've got maybe about 150, I'll make these pieces into the side
      lattices. I'll need about 70 roof pieces I guess. I figure on making
      the spacing of the side lattice pieces about 5" to 6", like I see done
      in Asia. I will make about a 12-15' diameter yurt. I think anything
      over 18' would be overambitious and take the fun all out of it.

      After I get the framework all made and assembled, I'll fit a covering
      over it. I plan to use ordinary carpet underlay felt for the covering
      with a canvas outer layer. This outer layer I'll make from painter's
      drop cloths since I can buy them cheap. The inner lining of the side
      walls, I'll use a grass/reed matting that one can also buy. I'll paint
      it to make the inside look nice. I'll paint the frame too--red. That's
      a color of good fortune in Asia. The floor I'll lay down tarps cut to
      fit and over that with underlayment. Over that, I'll put painted
      canvas. I think these painted canvas flooring will be made in sections
      as will the outside shell so it's easy to handle.

      The important point for me is to remember that everything costs and it
      keeps on costing as we have to care for it. I think people often forget
      about such things and cut out too much for themselves. I'm older and
      I've had burdens to carry around all my life and I'm starting to realize
      the wisdom and even the richness of having less. Too much stuff can
      make life a struggle. I want the yurt to be more than a camp but only
      in the comfort it brings me. I plan to use many camp and backpacking
      items within it. In this case I believe less is more. I want freedom
      from the treadmill, not a bigger treadmill.

      For furnishings, I plan to keep that pretty simple too. More on that
      later. I've got to go earn some money.

      Cheers,
      Mengro, the Road Scholar
    • Robert Matthews
      Hi Mengro, Fantastic idea. I was in Kyrgyzstan earlier this summer. The yurts are beautiful and I have a lot of photos and measurements of them. The steep
      Message 2 of 5 , Oct 1, 2005
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        Hi Mengro,

        Fantastic idea. I was in Kyrgyzstan earlier this summer. The yurts are beautiful and I have a lot of photos and measurements of them.  

         

        The steep roofs will shed the rain and snow and make the interior very spacious. A 5m(16 foot) yurt is about 55 uks or roof poles.   The wall spacing is 5-7’’ and each wall pole about 78’’ long.  

         

        The key to them is the bending of the wall poles and the roof poles. You will be hard pressed to find naturally bent poles that will work for the wall as its an S shape and these need to be very accurately made.

         

        However to bend them isn’t hard.  First they steam them and then form the bend in a clamping/bending tool (I have photos), finally they are left to dry in a form.

        I am writing a book about yurt making in Kyrgyzstan (and other places), I am still researching but am only too willing to help,

        Best wishes

        Robert

         

         

        -----Original Message-----
        From: The_Yurt_Community@yahoogroups.com [mailto:The_Yurt_Community@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Mengro, the Road Scholar
        Sent: 01 October 2005 14:26
        To: The_Yurt_Community@yahoogroups.com
        Subject: [The_Yurt_Community] Plans

         

        Hi there,

        Now that Florida temps are hitting below 90 F. during the day on
        occasion, I guess it's time to start living again.  God, these Florida
        summers are worse than my old Maine winters.

        I think this year before next summer I'll build a traditional Asian yurt
        like they would build in Kazakhstan, Kyrgyz, or Siberia, rather than the
        Mongolian style.  The reason I'm choosing one of these is that I believe
        it is more appropriate for a wetter climate.  I don't actually know this
        is true but I reason it is.  For one, I plan to make the roof higher in
        the center than the Mongolian style that in my opinion can in some cases
        almost resemble a pillbox in how flat the roof is.  Can you imagine a
        foot of wet snow sitting on top of a flat-roofed yurt? 

        I plan to go down to the drainage ditches along the roadside and cut
        willow with a natural bend to it, peel it, drill it, and prepare it.
        When I've got maybe about 150, I'll make these pieces into the side
        lattices.  I'll need about 70 roof pieces I guess.  I figure on making
        the spacing of the side lattice pieces about 5" to 6", like I see done
        in Asia.  I will make about a 12-15' diameter yurt.  I think anything
        over 18' would be overambitious and take the fun all out of it. 

        After I get the framework all made and assembled, I'll fit a covering
        over it.  I plan to use ordinary carpet underlay felt for the covering
        with a canvas outer layer.  This outer layer I'll make from painter's
        drop cloths since I can buy them cheap.  The inner lining of the side
        walls, I'll use a grass/reed matting that one can also buy.  I'll paint
        it to make the inside look nice.  I'll paint the frame too--red.  That's
        a color of good fortune in Asia.  The floor I'll lay down tarps cut to
        fit and over that with underlayment.  Over that, I'll put painted
        canvas.  I think these painted canvas flooring will be made in sections
        as will the outside shell so it's easy to handle.

        The important point for me is to remember that everything costs and it
        keeps on costing as we have to care for it.  I think people often forget
        about such things and cut out too much for themselves.  I'm older and
        I've had burdens to carry around all my life and I'm starting to realize
        the wisdom and even the richness of having less.  Too much stuff can
        make life a struggle.  I want the yurt to be more than a camp but only
        in the comfort it brings me.  I plan to use many camp and backpacking
        items within it.  In this case I believe less is more.  I want freedom
        from the treadmill, not a bigger treadmill.

        For furnishings, I plan to keep that pretty simple too.  More on that
        later.  I've got to go earn some money.

        Cheers,
        Mengro, the Road Scholar

      • Crappiefisher
        sounds like you have a good plan there. good luck with your yurt! be sure to post pics as well! hey, i was wondering if bamboo could also be used for building
        Message 3 of 5 , Oct 3, 2005
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          sounds like you have a good plan there. good luck with your yurt! be
          sure to post pics as well!

          hey, i was wondering if bamboo could also be used for building rather
          than willows? any ideas from anyone?
        • yurt_head
          ... Hi!- I know of a cupala people that have used bamboo for the roof poles. The poles are really strong and look great for sure. The issue is that bamboo
          Message 4 of 5 , Oct 3, 2005
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            > hey, i was wondering if bamboo could also be used for building rather
            > than willows? any ideas from anyone?

            Hi!-

            I know of a cupala' people that have used bamboo for the roof poles.
            The poles are really strong and look great for sure. The issue is that
            bamboo wears pretty quickly...it wont take too long before all the
            poles have cracks in them. They actually hold up pretty well in that
            state, as the cracks rarely extend beyond a single node. The get a bit
            rough to handle, I think. You will be replacing bamboo often depending
            on how much use it gets. The other trick with bamboo poles is coming up
            with a way to reinforce the end where it connects with your roofring,
            keeping in mind that you have to deal with the variation in the
            diameter of the bamboo.

            Haven't tried it for the walls, but it does not sound like something
            that could outlast ya like a wood yurt would. You certianly can't beat
            the price though if you harvest it yourself!

            -willie
          • mengrotheroadscholar
            Very cool, Robert. I hope it is as good as The Complete Yurt Handbook by Paul King. That s a great book. My only complaint is that he gives a bit more
            Message 5 of 5 , Oct 3, 2005
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              Very cool, Robert. I hope it is as good as "The Complete Yurt
              Handbook" by Paul King. That's a great book. My only complaint is
              that he gives a bit more emphasis to the Mongolian yurt where I prefer
              the Kyrgyz/Kazakhstan/Caucus/Tussian version.

              I sure would like details on a version that is somewhere between 12'
              and 16' or 18'. I don't want to make one that is so big that I might
              get discouraged. I figure it's going to be a lot more labor than most
              people might imagine by just looking at it. Don't forget to give the
              diameter of the central ring.

              There used to be an English site that talked about coppicing willowy
              type trees and they had some nice pics that I copied but recently I
              tried to find their site again and it's all changed and the
              Kyrgyzistan pics are no longer there. Too bad.

              The only thing I would caution you about not posting pics that you
              intend to be in your book because a publisher might balk about using
              something that has been published elsewhere.

              I would like details on the curving lattice pieces and also any forms
              used etc.

              Let me ask you, Robert, what do you think of this drawing of a Russian
              yurt? <http://www.shelterpub.com/_shelter/yurt.jpg> What about the
              dome-shaped roof? Have you ever seen any actual yurts like this?

              Thanks a lot,
              Baxt (good luck in Romani),
              Mengro, the Road Scholar


              --- In The_Yurt_Community@yahoogroups.com, "Robert Matthews" <Rob@D...
              > wrote:
              > Hi Mengro,
              > Fantastic idea. I was in Kyrgyzstan earlier this summer. The yurts
              are
              > beautiful and I have a lot of photos and measurements of them.
              >
              > The steep roofs will shed the rain and snow and make the interior
              very
              > spacious. A 5m(16 foot) yurt is about 55 uks or roof poles. The
              wall
              > spacing is 5-7'' and each wall pole about 78'' long.
              >
              > The key to them is the bending of the wall poles and the roof poles.
              You
              > will be hard pressed to find naturally bent poles that will work for
              the
              > wall as its an S shape and these need to be very accurately made.
              >
              > However to bend them isn't hard. First they steam them and then
              form
              > the bend in a clamping/bending tool (I have photos), finally they
              are
              > left to dry in a form.
              > I am writing a book about yurt making in Kyrgyzstan (and other
              places),
              > I am still researching but am only too willing to help,
              > Best wishes
              > Robert
              >
              >
              > -----Original Message-----
              > From: The_Yurt_Community@yahoogroups.com
              > [mailto:The_Yurt_Community@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Mengro, the
              > Road Scholar
              > Sent: 01 October 2005 14:26
              > To: The_Yurt_Community@yahoogroups.com
              > Subject: [The_Yurt_Community] Plans
              >
              > Hi there,
              >
              > Now that Florida temps are hitting below 90 F. during the day on
              > occasion, I guess it's time to start living again. God, these
              Florida
              > summers are worse than my old Maine winters.
              >
              > I think this year before next summer I'll build a traditional Asian
              yurt
              > like they would build in Kazakhstan, Kyrgyz, or Siberia, rather than
              the
              > Mongolian style. The reason I'm choosing one of these is that I
              believe
              > it is more appropriate for a wetter climate. I don't actually know
              this
              > is true but I reason it is. For one, I plan to make the roof higher
              in
              > the center than the Mongolian style that in my opinion can in some
              cases
              > almost resemble a pillbox in how flat the roof is. Can you imagine
              a
              > foot of wet snow sitting on top of a flat-roofed yurt?
              >
              > I plan to go down to the drainage ditches along the roadside and cut
              > willow with a natural bend to it, peel it, drill it, and prepare it.
              > When I've got maybe about 150, I'll make these pieces into the side
              > lattices. I'll need about 70 roof pieces I guess. I figure on
              making
              > the spacing of the side lattice pieces about 5" to 6", like I see
              done
              > in Asia. I will make about a 12-15' diameter yurt. I think
              anything
              > over 18' would be overambitious and take the fun all out of it.
              >
              > After I get the framework all made and assembled, I'll fit a
              covering
              > over it. I plan to use ordinary carpet underlay felt for the
              covering
              > with a canvas outer layer. This outer layer I'll make from
              painter's
              > drop cloths since I can buy them cheap. The inner lining of the
              side
              > walls, I'll use a grass/reed matting that one can also buy. I'll
              paint
              > it to make the inside look nice. I'll paint the frame too--red.
              That's
              > a color of good fortune in Asia. The floor I'll lay down tarps cut
              to
              > fit and over that with underlayment. Over that, I'll put painted
              > canvas. I think these painted canvas flooring will be made in
              sections
              > as will the outside shell so it's easy to handle.
              >
              > The important point for me is to remember that everything costs and
              it
              > keeps on costing as we have to care for it. I think people often
              forget
              > about such things and cut out too much for themselves. I'm older
              and
              > I've had burdens to carry around all my life and I'm starting to
              realize
              > the wisdom and even the richness of having less. Too much stuff can
              > make life a struggle. I want the yurt to be more than a camp but
              only
              > in the comfort it brings me. I plan to use many camp and
              backpacking
              > items within it. In this case I believe less is more. I want
              freedom
              > from the treadmill, not a bigger treadmill.
              >
              > For furnishings, I plan to keep that pretty simple too. More on
              that
              > later. I've got to go earn some money.
              >
              > Cheers,
              > Mengro, the Road Scholar
              >
              >
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